Recent Posts

Asparagus – The Sure Sign of Spring!

Asparagus –the veggie, springtime superstar is so versatile. We love it steamed, grilled, roasted or sautéed; in soups, salads, or as a delicious side.

Although a lot of people have the perception that skinny asparagus is preferable, I don’t agree! The thicker stemmed fat ones are much better in flavor.

Just give it a rinse, and then snap off the fibrous ends at the “natural break.” You can save these for veggie stock or add to your compost bin.


Photo from Simply Recipes.

For sunny northwest days I like to coat my asparagus with a little olive oil and seasoning. Then toss it on a hot grill till just tender. Serve with a quick squeeze of lemon and a grating of fresh parmesan – yum!

Or how about the beloved combo of steamed asparagus with a rich and decadent hollandaise? Well I’ve got a Quick and Easy Blender Sauce recipe that will have you serving up this classic combo in no time.

So pick up some asparagus while the season is prime! –Kathy

Quick and Easy Blender Hollandaise
The entire amount of hot butter is key to this recipe, so be sure to make a full recipe. Serve over freshly steamed broccoli or asparagus, with fish or seafood or on steaks … and of course Eggs Benedict!

Makes 1 cup

1/2 cup (1 stick) butter
1 tablespoon cream cheese
3 egg yolks or 1/4 cup pasteurized egg yolks
2 tablespoons freshly squeezed Sunkist® Lemon juice
1/4 teaspoon salt
Dash of hot sauce

In a small saucepan, heat butter over medium heat until bubbling and hot (but not brown). Or heat to bubbling in microwave.

While butter is heating, combine cream cheese, egg yolks, lemon juice, salt and hot sauce in a blender. Process for a few seconds to combine ingredients.

When butter is hot, with blender motor running, remove lid and add butter in a slow, thin stream; go slowly so it incorporates nicely.

Serve immediately or keep warm for up to 30 minutes by placing sauce in a plastic container with a tight-fitting lid or mason jar with lid, set in a small bowl of hot water.
Sunkist Tips:
-Add in some lemon zest at the end for extra lemony flavor!
-Add 2 to 3 teaspoons of minced fresh tarragon or chives.

Recipe by Kathy Casey Food Studios® for Sunkist®.

Posted by Kathy on April 19th, 2019  |  Comments Off on Asparagus – The Sure Sign of Spring! |  Posted in Dishing with Kathy Casey Blog, Kathy Casey, KOMO Radio, Recent Posts, Recipes, sides, vegetables

Morel Mushrooms – Springtime Northwest Gold

Local, wild morel mushrooms are treasured like gold and every spring fungi enthusiasts rush out to scope their secret spots, looking for the first signs of this delicacy!

Morels fruit in two types of habitat. In areas where they are naturalized, they fruit every year. It is usually a grassy area where natural composting occurs or along a stream where leaves drop to give them food.


(Photo from the Outdoor Life)

The other type of habitat is disturbed areas, such as logged or burned areas, where the morels will come up only once because there is no continuous source of food. But sometimes we get really lucky and even find morels in our backyards where new grass has been planted, thus disturbing the soil.

Predicting where and when these jewels will appear is the real art. If you’re not an experienced picker then you need to join a mushroom interest group or find an experienced picker to go with, but most fungi hunters keep their spots pretty secret.

Check out the Puget Sound Mycological Society to learn about field trips and more about our NW wild mushrooms. Or visit your local farmers markets for local forager’s finds.

And if you’ve been out foraging then you deserve a little splurge – as cream and morels are so amazing together! Try out Morels in Cream Sauce, it’s good on anything! From chicken to halibut to salmon, to crostini … yum! Happy Spring! – Kathy

Morels in Cream Sauce
I also like to add a squeeze of fresh lemon and zest to pop the flavor.

Makes about 4 – 6 servings

2 Tbsps. olive oil or butter
1/2 lb. fresh morels, cleaned and sliced
1 chopped shallot
1 cup dry white wine
1 cup whipping cream
2 Tbsps. butter (optional)
salt & pepper to taste
snipped fresh chives

Heat skillet on medium-high to high, add oil, then mushrooms and shallot. Saute for 1 minute, then add the wine. Continue cooking over high heat until the wine is reduced by half. Then add the cream and reduce by half. Reduce the heat to low, add the butter, and season with salt and pepper to taste. Cook until thickened. Sprinkle with chives.

Serve as an appetizer with fresh, crusty bread for dipping, or serve atop sauteed chicken breasts or your favorite fish or seafood.

Recipe by Kathy Casey Food Studios®.

Posted by Kathy on April 11th, 2019  |  Comments Off on Morel Mushrooms – Springtime Northwest Gold |  Posted in Dishing with Kathy Casey Blog, KOMO Radio, Recent Posts, Recipes

D’lish Deviled Eggs

Deviled Eggs – they are everywhere these days! The long loved classic-style made with mustard, mayo and some pickle relish is a popular picnic and party favorite. But these days deviled eggs are getting all dressed up.

Steak and eggs? Yes, we have a deviled egg for that! Just mix up the yolks with a little A1 steak sauce and a touch of mayo – fill and top with a small slice of grilled steak.

For those that like it spicy, you’ll love my Wasabi Deviled Eggs. Wasabi paste, green onion, a touch of mayo and tiny diced cucumber get mixed with the yolk. I like to top this one with a spicy wasabi pea for a crunchy fun garnish!!


Who’s ready for a bite of Wasabi Deviled Eggs?
Photos from D’Lish Deviled Eggs.

Or how about getting your fiesta on with my Chipotle Deviled Eggs: add in some chipotle to deviled egg filling, then top with a little fresh salsa and pieces of crunchy corn chips.

deviled eggs
Chipotle Deviled Eggs—yum!
Photos from D’Lish Deviled Eggs.

Have trouble peeling your hard boiled eggs? Well here’s a tip: roll them on the counter (gently) then peel under running water so the shells slip off easily.

And for more deviled egg ideas, make sure to get a copy of D’Lish Deviled Eggs – with over 50 recipes, there’s a recipe for everyone! So get crackin’ and enjoy some d’lish deviled eggs! –Kathy


Available in book stores, at the Food Studios, and online!

Wasabi Deviled Eggs
Wasabi adds a creative kick of heat, and crisp, fresh cucumber adds textural crunch to these bold eggs. Top these little green devils with a wasabi pea for a fun finish.

Makes 24

1 dozen hard-cooked eggs (recipe follows)

Filling
6 Tbsp. mayonnaise
1 Tbsp. purchased wasabi paste (or 1 tablespoon wasabi powder mixed with 1 tablespoon water)
2 Tbsp. thinly sliced green onion
2 Tbsp. finely minced English cucumber

Topping
24 wasabi peas

Halve the eggs lengthwise and transfer the yolks to a mixing bowl. Set the egg white halves on a platter, cover, and refrigerate.

With a fork, mash the yolks to a smooth consistency. Add the mayonnaise and wasabi paste, and mix until smooth. (You can also do this in a mixing bowl with a whip attachment.) Stir in the green onion and cucumber.

Spoon the mixture into a pastry bag fitted with a plain or large star tip, then pipe the mixture evenly into the egg white halves. Or fill the eggs with a spoon, dividing the filling evenly.

Top each egg half with a wasabi pea, whole or cracked.

Recipe from D’Lish Deviled Eggs by Kathy Casey, Andrews McMeel Publishing

Chipotle Deviled Eggs
I’ve been making these for years and they have become a cocktail-party staple. The spicy tomato topping adds textural and visual pizzazz. Serve these with your favorite margarita for a perfect pairing.

Makes 24

1 dozen hard-cooked eggs (recipe follows)

Filling,
3 Tbsp. mayonnaise
3 Tbsp. regular or low-fat sour cream
1/2 tsp. Dijon mustard
1 to 2 Tbsp. chipotle chile purée (see tip)
1 tsp minced fresh garlic
1/4 tsp salt
2 Tbsp. thinly sliced green onion

Topping
1/2 cup small-diced tomatoes
1 Tbsp minced white onion
2 Tbsps chopped fresh cilantro
1 to 2 tsps chipotle chile purée (see tip)
Halve the eggs lengthwise and transfer the yolks to a mixing bowl. Set the egg white halves on a platter, cover, and refrigerate.
With a fork, mash the yolks to a smooth consistency. Add the mayonnaise, sour cream, mustard, chipotle purée, garlic, and salt, and mix until smooth. (You can also do this in a mixing bowl with a whip attachment.) Stir in the green onion.
Spoon the mixture into a pastry bag fitted with a plain or large star tip, then pipe the mixture evenly into the egg white halves. Or fill the eggs with a spoon, dividing the filling evenly.
To make the topping, in a small bowl, mix together the tomatoes, onion, cilantro, and chipotle purée. Top each egg half with about 1 tsp of the topping.
Tip: To make chipotle chile purée, place canned chipotle peppers in adobo sauce, with the sauce, in a food processor or blender and purée until smooth. Freeze any extra purée for another use.

Recipe from D’Lish Deviled Eggs by Kathy Casey, Andrews McMeel Publishing

Hard-Cooked Eggs
1 dozen large chicken eggs

Place the eggs in a large nonreactive saucepan and add cold water to 1 inch above the eggs. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Turn off the heat and let the eggs sit for 10 minutes. Remove from the stove and run cool water over the eggs in the pan until they are cooled. When cool, carefully peel them under running water.

Recipe from D’Lish Deviled Eggs by Kathy Casey, Andrews McMeel Publishing

Posted by Kathy on March 28th, 2019  |  Comments Off on D’lish Deviled Eggs |  Posted in appetizers, Books to Cook, Dishing with Kathy Casey Blog, Kathy Casey, KOMO Radio, Recent Posts, Recipes, Snacks

Tasty Garden Rocket: Arugula!

Ah, arugula! This bold green livens up any dish it’s in. Nicknamed “Garden Rocket,” it grows fast, almost like a weed in our northwest climate.

Well, weed or not, this tasty leaf is full of great health benefits. Just 4 ounces of this green is just 25 calories – wow! It’s also full of vital antioxidants and vitamins – 3 cups gives you 100% of your daily vitamin K needs!

Arugla’s taste is nutty and peppery. Try it tucked into sandwiches, or tossed in a little olive oil and scattered over a sexy cheese pizza. This tasty green also complements meat and seafood beautifully. It makes a perfect bed for a piece of grilled fish or steak.

Of course, it’s great in salads like in my Baby Arugula, Orange & Fennel Salad with Grilled Shrimp & White Balsamic Vinaigrette. It’s also a delicious add-in to a homemade pesto recipe for a robust, peppery edge!

So get your arugula on and dig into this peppery green that’s so good for you! – Kathy

Baby Arugula Salad
Photo from Kathy Casey’s Northwest Table, Chronicle Books.

Baby Arugula, Orange & Fennel Salad with Grilled Shrimp and White Balsamic Vinaigrette
Makes 6 to 8 servings

Shrimp
1 Tbsp undiluted orange juice concentrate
Pinch of red pepper flakes
2 Tbsp minced orange zest
1 Tbsp Dijon mustard
2 Tbsp minced shallots
1/2 cup olive oil
2 Tbsp minced fennel fronds
1 Tbsp fennel seed, toasted and crushed
2 1/2 tsp kosher salt
1/2 tsp black pepper
2 lbs large raw shrimp (32 to 40)

Salad
1 large or 2 small fennel bulbs, trimmed
6 oranges or tangerines
6 cups baby arugula
2 heads baby frisée, torn, rinsed and spun dry
White Balsamic Vinaigrette (recipe follows)

To marinate the shrimp, whisk all the ingredients, except the shrimp, in a large bowl. Peel, devein, and remove tails of the shrimp then add them to the marinade and toss to coat. Refrigerate and marinate for at least 1 hour or overnight.

To prepare the salad, finely shave the fennel bulbs with a sharp knife or a mandoline and crisp in ice water for 10 minutes. Spin dry before using. Cut the peel off the oranges, trim away all the white pith, then cut the fruit into 1/4-inch-thick slices. Flick out any seeds. (If prepared ahead, refrigerate the fennel and orange slices separately, for up to 2 hours.)

Prepare a hot fire in a charcoal grill, or preheat a gas grill to high. Grill the shrimp until just pink and done, about 1 to 2 minutes per side.

Meanwhile, toss the arugula, frisée, fennel, and oranges with enough of the vinaigrette to coat nicely—taste for flavor, adding more dressing if needed.

Serve the salad on a large platter or divide among individual plates, arrange the shrimp on top, and drizzle with a little extra dressing, if desired.

White Balsamic Vinaigrette
The vinaigrette keeps, refrigerated, for up to 2 weeks.

Makes 2 cups

1/2 cup white balsamic vinegar
2 Tbsp minced shallots
1 1/2 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup undiluted orange juice concentrate
Pinch of red pepper flakes, or 1 Tbsp harissa paste
2 tsp kosher salt
Freshly ground black pepper
1 Tbsp fennel seed, toasted and ground
1 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1 Tbsp chopped fennel fronds

In a large bowl, whisk the vinegar, shallots, mustard, and juice concentrate. Whisk in the pepper flakes, salt, pepper to taste, and fennel seed. Slowly drizzle in the oil, whisking constantly to emulsify. Stir in the fennel fronds. If made ahead, refrigerate until shortly before needed, then rewhisk before using.

Recipe from Kathy Casey’s Northwest Table, Chronicle Books.

Posted by Kathy Casey on March 21st, 2019  |  Comments Off on Tasty Garden Rocket: Arugula! |  Posted in Books to Cook, Dishing with Kathy Casey Blog, KOMO Radio, Recent Posts, Recipes, salads, seafood, sides

Cinnamon

Cinnamon has a spicy history. Wars were fought over trading rights and Ancient Romans paid more for cinnamon than its weight in gold!

Cinnamon Sticks
Fresh cinnamon sticks from World Spice Merchants at Pike Place!

It has been used for thousands of years in Chinese medicine for its warming qualities to provide relief at the beginning of a cold or flu, especially when mixed in tea with fresh ginger.

Today everybody’s spice rack has a jar of ground cinnamon lying around. It’s a must for all those recipes that are oh-so-American from apple pie to cinnamon rolls to snicker doodles. We love our cinnamon!

But it’s not only used for sweets. It flavors all TYPES of foods from Greek eggplant moussaka and spicy Indian curries to Mexican hot chocolate and Middle Eastern pastries. Cinnamon adds a warming touch to Garam Masala, a spice mix with cloves, cardamom and cumin used in finishing vegetables and meat dishes.

I also love it in couscous dishes and even in a sultry Spiced Vinaigrette on a salad. Cinnamon Scented Basmati Rice will change how you cook rice forever!

One thing to remember ground cinnamon only lasts for about 6 months, and cinnamon sticks stay fresh for about a year. Keep your spice jars tightly sealed and in a cool spot.

Keep things spicy with a hint of cinnamon! – Kathy

Spiced Vinaigrette
Makes 1 cup

1/4 cup white wine vinegar
4 tsp. light brown sugar
1/2 tsp. vanilla extract
1/8 tsp. crushed red pepper flakes
1/8 tsp. ground cloves
1/4 tsp. ground cinnamon
1/8 tsp. ground coriander
1/8 tsp. ground cumin
1/2 tsp. salt
3/4 cup olive oil
1 tsp. finely minced fresh ginger

Combine vinegar, brown sugar, vanilla extract, spices, and salt in mixing bowl, whisking well.

Gradually whisk in olive oil, emulsifying the dressing. Whisk in minced ginger. Let sit 8 hours or longer before using.

Store extra dressing refrigerated for up to 2 weeks.

Recipe by Kathy Casey Food Studios® – www.KathyCasey.com

Cinnamon Scented Basmati Rice
Makes 4 to 6 servings

1 cup basmati rice, rinsed and drained well
3 Tbsps. butter
3/4 cup 1/4-inch-diced onion
1 cinnamon stick, cracked in half
1 1/2 tsp. minced garlic
Small pinch cayenne
1 1/2 cups water
1 Tbsp. fresh lemon (or lime) juice
1 1/2 tsp. minced lemon (or lime) zest
2 Tbsps. cream
1 1/4 tsp. salt
2 Tbsps. thinly sliced chives

Preheat an oven to 375°F. Place the very well-drained rice in a 1 1/2-quart baking dish.

Melt the butter in a nonstick or heavy saucepan. Add the onion and cinnamon stick and sauté over medium heat until soft, about 2 minutes. Add the garlic and cook for about 30 seconds. Add the cayenne, water, lemon juice, lemon zest, cream, and salt, and bring to a boil.

Stir the mixture into the rice, being sure to scrape up and include all the goodies. Seal tightly with foil and bake for about 20 to 25 minutes, or until the rice is tender and all the liquid is absorbed. Fluff with a fork before serving, then fold in the chives.

Recipe adapted from Dishing with Kathy Casey Cookbook.

Posted by Kathy on March 14th, 2019  |  Comments Off on Cinnamon |  Posted in Dishing with Kathy Casey Blog, KOMO Radio, Recent Posts, Recipes, sides

Carrot Craze

prod000633
Burbee.com Carrot Varieties 
 

Who would have thought that carrots would be the next “it” veggie?

Nowadays, the quintessential orange carrot we have come to love has close competition with some unexpectedly colorful varieties. Typically found at your local farmer’s market, these beautiful heirlooms come in wonderful shades of purple, ruby, yellow and white.

 

harrisa-carrot
Harissa Roasted Carrots
 

I like to pick-up a bundle of fresh heirloom carrots, rub them with some olive oil and flavorful seasoning like Duqqa; an aromatic Egyptian mixture of toasted nuts and seeds like hazelnuts, sesame seeds, coriander and cumin, or Harissa then roast them in a hot oven and top with a dollop of Greek yogurt and a scattering of fresh cilantro. The roasting brings out the sweetness and the spices really compliment the carrot flavor. Oh and don’t be afraid to char the carrots a little – they can handle it – yum!

Of course we all enjoy carrots as the perfect snack too, sweet and satisfyingly crunchy – they are filled with antioxidants, Vitamin A and C, beta-carotene, minerals, fiber and so much more yet are still a low calorie treat. For a great appetizer, try roasting and pureeing carrots with garlic and lemon for a simple carrot hummus or blending them into a gingery salad dressing!

carrot-collins2
Honey Mint Carrot Collins
The fresh pressed carrot juice makes the color of this cocktail amazing!
 

Besides baking into a sweet carrot cake, or roasting with warm spices, I also love drinking carrot juice too! Because of their bright color and sweet flavor, I love adding fresh carrot juice to citrusy drinks like lemon – or limeades, sparkling water, and of course, cocktails.

Whether you are roasting, baking, juicing, or snacking – carrots are one veggie that won’t ever let you down. – Kathy

 

Harissa Roasted Carrots

Serves 4

12 heirloom carrots peeled and split in half, leaving about an inch of stem.
3 – 4 Tbsp Moroccan Harissa Paste
2 Tbsp Olive Oil plus more for drizzling
6 – 8 oz of Greek Yogurt
Finishing Salt to taste

 

Preheat oven to 475 degrees. Combine the Harissa paste with the olive oil in a small bowl and mix together until well combined. Toss the carrots in the harissa mixture until nicely coated then add to a roasting pan, being sure carrots are evenly separated and not overlapping. Roast the carrots for 10 minutes or until the carrots are tender and have a nice char to your liking.

Once you are ready to serve, plate the carrots and dollop with Greek yogurt. I like serving this with warm couscous, drizzled with olive oil and a sprinkling of finishing salt.

Recipe by Kathy Casey Food Studios®

 

 

Honey Mint Carrot Collins

Makes 1 cocktail
1 1/2 ounces gin
3/4 ounce Honey Mint Syrup (recipe follows)
3/4 ounce fresh pressed carrot juice
3/4 ounce fresh squeezed Sunkist Lemon juice
————————————
1 ounce chilled Perrier
Garnish: Fresh Origins Micro Carrot and Micro Mint

Measure gin, Honey Mint Syrup and juices into a mixing glass. Fill with ice, cap and shake vigorously. Pour drink into a Collins glass and top with soda. Garnish.

Honey Mint Syrup
Makes about 10 ounces
8 sprigs fresh mint
3/4 cup clover honey
3/4 cup water

Combine ingredients in small saucepan. On medium-high heat, bring liquid to a boil while siring to combine well. Immediately reduce heat to low, and simmer for 1 minute. Remove from heat and let steep for 45 minutes. Strain and store refrigerated for up to two weeks.

Recipe by Kathy Casey Food Studios®

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Kathy on March 7th, 2019  |  Comments Off on Carrot Craze |  Posted in appetizers, Cocktails, Dishing with Kathy Casey Blog, Kathy Casey, KOMO Radio, Lifestyle, Recent Posts, vegetables

Spice It Up!

When we say the word “spice” these days, people will most likely think of something spicy and chili-forward but today I want to shed some light on the warm spices – like aromatic cloves, nutmeg, ginger, allspice and of course cinnamon. They’re not just for apple pie, cookies and cinnamon rolls either.

Cinnamon
Photo from The Kitchn.com
 

In ancient times, spices were used as currency to do all types of trade and these warm spices have been used from Morocco to China for thousands of years.

In the Middle East, you will commonly find these flavors used for savory rubs on meats like lamb and in curries and stews. In India, cinnamon will often be used to flavor rice.

They are not only delicious, lots of research has shown these spices have been linked to amazing health benefits, like reducing blood pressure, improving cholesterol levels, and lowering heart disease risks.

Grandma may have told you to chew on a clove for a toothache, but now we know it’s because they’re great as an anti-inflammatory and have beneficial antioxidants. Did you know allspice has amazing detoxifying benefits too?

It’s easy to spice things up with these warm and flavorful spices. If you’re a juicer, try adding a pinch of your favorite aromatic spice blend to your recipe, or add in a cinnamon stick and a few cloves to your next batch of steamed rice, pasta sauce, or vegetables stew. For something sweet, mix 1/4 teaspoon of cinnamon and nutmeg into your favorite cocoa mix for a wonderful hot cocoa. They also add wonderful warmth to coffees and teas. If you toast your spices before you add them to your dishes, it opens them up and brings out their flavors even more.

These simple spice staples can make a regular dish exotic in no time so try experimenting with warm spices in your dishes and find your new favorite “secret ingredient”– Kathy

 

Spice Blend Seasoning Guide

Apply spice blends more liberally than just salt and pepper since there are a lot of other ingredients besides the S&P. Also, you may want to put the spices on meat and seafoods a little while before cooking to allow the flavors time to penetrate.

Use about 1/8 – 1/4 teaspoon per large shrimp or scallop, about 1/2 teaspoon per small chicken breast or fish fillet, and about 3/4 – 1 teaspoon for a large steak.

 

Perfectly Persian Spice

A great blend to season up chicken, lamb, pork, grilled eggplant, onions or white fish.

Makes about scant 1/2 cup

1/4 cup kosher salt
1/4 tsp. cayenne pepper
1/4 tsp. ground cloves
1 tsp. ground cinnamon
1 tsp. ground coriander
1/2 tsp. ground cumin
1 tsp. mild curry powder
2 tbsp. sugar

Mix ingredients together well. Store in an airtight container if not using immediately. Be sure to re-mix after storing because ingredients will settle out a bit.

 

Star Anise Sprinkle

Sprinkle on tuna, salmon, chicken, duck, pork, sautéed or roasted carrots, steamed rice, or use in a quick onion or cucumber pickle.

Makes 1/2 cup

2 whole cinnamon sticks, broken into pieces
1/4 cup star anise
2 tsp. whole black peppercorns
1 tsp. whole coriander seeds
1 1/2 tsp. dry orange peel
1/4 cup kosher salt
2 tbsp. sugar

In a spice grinder or small coffee grinder, process spices to a medium-ground consistency; do not grind too fine. Mix spices with salt and sugar.

Copyright 2016 by Kathy Casey.

Posted by Kathy on February 28th, 2019  |  Comments Off on Spice It Up! |  Posted in Dishing with Kathy Casey Blog, Kathy Casey, KOMO Radio, Recent Posts, Recipes

Brussels Sprouts

Brussels sprouts – who ever thought that these mini-cabbages would become the uber- popular vegetable! From bar menus to bacon & bourbon lathered side dishes, they are definitely on just about every menu these days.

Hipster yes, but good for you, too! These veggies are chock full of vitamins K and C, as well as iron, fiber and vitamin A.

There are lots of great ways to prepare Brussels sprouts at home from quick sautéed to oven roasted… even shaved and raw in a slaw or salad. Try them roasted with a Bacon Citrus Toss – d’lish!

You can also separate the “leaves” and give those a quick toss in a hot pan for a d’lish topping for mac and cheese or grilled pork. To do this, cut the core of the Brussels sprout out with a small paring knife, Then you can “peel” all the leaves off easily.

Cook them in a hot pan with a smidge of olive oil or butter until they are bright green but not too wilted. Finish it off with a squeeze of lemon. YUM! –Kathy


Photo by Kathy Casey Food Studios® for Sunkist.

Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Bacon Citrus Toss
Brussels sprouts are the “it” vegetable of the dinner table these days. The tangy citrus toss plays well with the rich bacon in the dressing, making for a delicious side-dish. Or try serving as an appetizer or as a warm salad over greens.

Makes between 4-6 servings

6 cups trimmed Brussels sprouts, halved if large (about 1 1/2 pounds)
2 Tbsp. olive oil
1/4 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. freshly ground black pepper
3 strips bacon, cut into thin slices
1 Tbsp. brown sugar
1 Sunkist® Meyer Lemon, zested and juiced, zest reserved separately
1 Sunkist Minneola Tangelo Orange, zested and juiced, zest reserved separately

Preheat oven to 425°F.

In a large bowl, toss Brussels sprouts with olive oil, salt and pepper.

Transfer to a rimmed baking sheet and roast until tender and showing good color, about 30 minutes.

Meanwhile, in a medium skillet, cook bacon until crispy, about 5 minutes. Add brown sugar and both citrus juices. Increase heat to high and let mixture reduce by half. Take care not to burn.

When Brussels sprouts are done, place them in a large serving bowl or platter, drizzle with the warm bacon-citrus mixture, and toss together with reserved zests. Serve immediately.

Recipe by: Kathy Casey Food Studios® for Sunkist.

Posted by Kathy on February 21st, 2019  |  Comments Off on Brussels Sprouts |  Posted in Dishing with Kathy Casey Blog, Lifestyle, Recent Posts, Recipes, sides
Untitled