poultry

D’lish Deviled Eggs

Anyone who knows me knows that I love deviled eggs. Whenever I show up to a party with a full party platter of them, they are the first thing to fly off the table!

How much do I love them? Well, I wrote a whole book about them – my new book D’Lish Deviled Eggs features more than 50 classic and creative variations!

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Everyone has their favorite way of making them. I know that grandma’s classic recipe is always a go-to for most people, but these one-bite (maybe two-bite!) apps are the perfect platform to get inspired with!

From California Roll Deviled Eggs with a filling made with avocado and wasabi topped with crab and cucumber – to sassy Chipotle Eggs to Cheddar and Bacon—there are tons of different takes on the classic and some fun and kitschy variations too. What better way to use up all those hard-boiled eggs after Easter?

D’lish Deviled Eggs is available in books stores, online and digital. Just think, you’ll have over 50 new ideas for your next party appetizer!

Web: www.dlishdeviledeggs.com for more fun deviled egg tips and recipes.

Tweet Tweet: @chickytweets on Twitter!

So get crackin’ and enjoy some d’lish deviled eggs! –Kathy

Chipotle Deviled Eggs

Chipotle Deviled Eggs—yum!
(Photo © Kathy Casey Food Studios from D’Lish Deviled Eggs)

Chipotle Deviled Eggs

I’ve been making these for years and they have become a cocktail-party staple. The spicy tomato topping adds textural and visual pizzazz. Serve these with your favorite margarita for a perfect pairing.

Makes 24

1 dozen hard-cooked eggs (recipe follows)

Filling
3 Tbsps mayonnaise
3 Tbsps regular or low-fat sour cream
1/2 tsp Dijon mustard
1 to 2 Tbsps chipotle chile purée (see tip)
1 tsp minced fresh garlic
1/4 tsp salt
2 Tbsps thinly sliced green onion

Topping
1/2 cup small-diced tomatoes
1 Tbsp minced white onion
2 Tbsps chopped fresh cilantro
1 to 2 tsps chipotle chile purée (see tip)

Halve the eggs lengthwise and transfer the yolks to a mixing bowl. Set the egg white halves on a platter, cover, and refrigerate.

With a fork, mash the yolks to a smooth consistency. Add the mayonnaise, sour cream, mustard, chipotle purée, garlic, and salt, and mix until smooth. (You can also do this in a mixing bowl with a whip attachment.) Stir in the green onion.

Spoon the mixture into a pastry bag fitted with a plain or large star tip, then pipe the mixture evenly into the egg white halves. Or fill the eggs with a spoon, dividing the filling evenly.

To make the topping, in a small bowl, mix together the tomatoes, onion, cilantro, and chipotle purée. Top each egg half with about 1 tsp of the topping.

Tip: To make chipotle chile purée, place canned chipotle peppers in adobo sauce, with the sauce, in a food processor or blender and purée until smooth. Freeze any extra purée for another use.

Hard-Cooked Eggs

1 dozen large chicken eggs

Place the eggs in a large nonreactive saucepan and add cold water to 1 inch above the eggs. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Turn off the heat and let the eggs sit for 10 minutes. Remove from the stove and run cool water over the eggs in the pan until they are cooled. When cool, carefully peel them under running water.

Recipe from D’Lish Deviled Eggs by Kathy Casey, Andrews McMeel Publishing

Posted by Kathy Casey on March 21st, 2013  |  Comments Off on D’lish Deviled Eggs |  Posted in Amazon, appetizers, Books to Cook, breakfast, dessert, Dishing with Kathy Casey Blog, Foodie News, KOMO Radio, poultry, Recent Posts, Recipes, seafood, sides, Snacks

It’s Clementine Season!

Sunny winter citrus is just the perfect way to help brighten the season when it gets chilly and the skies turn grey. With cold weather, comes cold and flu season. What a wonderful coincidence, then, that clementines are in season at the same time!

Clementines happen to be an excellent source of vitamin C, which helps support your immune system. Did you also know that they act as an antihistamine? It’s true! Battle those stuffed-up sinuses with as many clementines as you can grab, peel and eat —which might be a lot, considering how small and easy to peel they are!

They make a perfect any-time snack, but can also be incorporated into a stuffing, blended into a breakfast smoothie, or for a quick and easy appetizer. Just combine diced clementines with tomatoes, kalamata olives, minced red onion and fresh basil to top my d’lish Cuties Bruschetta with Goat Cheese. Great for on-the-fly entertaining!

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(Photo by Kathy Casey Food Studios®)

Or how about jazzing up that holiday stuffing? Flavorful clementies are tossed in my Overnight Wild-Rice & Sourdough Stuffing— made with cooked wild rice, sourdough bread, toasted almonds, drained cranberries, mushrooms and fresh herbs.  Yum!

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(Photo by Kathy Casey Food Studios®)

So whether you’re whipping up a delicious snack or trying something new for the holiday table – pick up some clementines. They’re sure to brighten up any dish! -Kathy

Cuties Bruschetta with Goat Cheese
The flavors of mandarin, calamata olives and fresh basil and the creaminess of goat cheese all play off each other nicely in this easy entertaining appetizer.

Makes 20 pieces

1 artisanal baguette
extra-virgin olive oil for drizzling
kosher salt as needed
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4 Cuties clementinese
2 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
3/4 cup chopped vine-ripe tomatoes
1/4 cup chopped fresh basil
2 Tbsp. minced red onion
1 1/2 tsp. finely minced garlic
1/4 cup chopped pitted calamata olives
pinch of red pepper flakes
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4 oz. chèvre-style fresh goat cheese

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

Cut baguette into 1/4-inch slices—you want about 20 nice-sized pieces. Lay out on a baking sheet. Lightly brush or drizzle bread with olive oil then sprinkle lightly with kosher salt. Bake for about 5–7 minutes, or until toasty. Let crostini cool.

Meanwhile, peel Cuties and dice 1/4 to 1/3-inch. In a medium bowl, toss Cuties with 2 tablespoons olive oil, tomatoes, basil, onion, garlic, olives, and pepper flakes. Set aside.

To serve: Smear each piece of crostini with a heaping teaspoon of goat cheese. Place on a platter and immediately divide the Cuties mixture between the crostini (drain off any excess juice).

Note: Top crostini right before serving so they do not get soft.

Recipe by Kathy Casey Food Studios®

Overnight Wild-Rice & Sourdough Stuffing
With big flavors and textures, this stuffing is great with game hens, turkey, chicken, holiday ham or pork chops.

Makes about 8 servings

6 cups water
2 tsp. kosher salt
3/4 cup wild rice
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6 Cuties clementines
4 cups 1/2-inch-cubed rustic sourdough bread
1/2 cup toasted, coarsely chopped almonds
6 Tbsp. salted butter
1 cup 1/4-inch-diced onion
1 cup 1/4-inch-diced celery
2 cups sliced cremini mushrooms
1 tsp. kosher salt (or more to taste)
1/4 tsp. fresh-ground black pepper
1/2 cup dried cranberries
1 1/2 cups low-sodium chicken broth
2 tsp. finely chopped fresh thyme
1 1/2 tsp. finely chopped fresh rosemary
1 Tbsp. chopped fresh sage
2 Tbsp. chopped fresh parsley
2 eggs, beaten

In a large pot, bring water and salt to a boil. Stir in wild rice and return to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer rice, stirring occasionally, for about 45 minutes to 1 hour, or until very tender. Drain and cool.

Meanwhile, peel the Cuties, cut in half crosswise, then break into half segments. Place in a large bowl with the bread and almonds, and set aside.

In a large sauté pan over medium-high heat, melt butter, add the onion, celery, and mushrooms, and season with salt and pepper. Sauté for about 7–8 minutes, or until tender. Remove from heat and add cranberries, broth and herbs.

Add mushroom mixture and cooled rice to bread mixture. Toss to mix evenly, then add the beaten egg and toss until bread is thoroughly coated. Cover and refrigerate overnight to let flavors develop.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Spray an 8-inch square baking pan with pan spray.

Re-toss stuffing, transfer to baking pan, and let sit for 30 minutes to come to room temperature while oven preheats. Bake in preheated oven for 35–45 minutes, or until cooked through.

Chef’s Note: When roasting a stuffed chicken or game hen, cook until internal temperature at the center of the stuffing is 165 degrees F.

Recipe by Kathy Casey Food Studios®

Posted by Kathy Casey on December 13th, 2012  |  Comments Off on It’s Clementine Season! |  Posted in appetizers, Dishing with Kathy Casey Blog, Fruit, KOMO Radio, Lifestyle, meats, poultry, Recent Posts, Recipes, sides

The Seattle Times

If you’re looking for other great tips, techniques and advice as well as recipes for a fantastic Thanksgiving Day feast, check out the annual Seattle Times’ holiday guide written by Nancy Leson. This guide along with the recipes features a lot of tips and tricks from Seattle chefs and restauranteurs (including myself!), with all sorts of appetizers, entrees, sides and even desserts! Check it out for a d’lish read and try out some of the recipes yourself; you’ll have your guests asking for more in no time!

Posted by Kathy Casey on November 16th, 2011  |  Comments Off on The Seattle Times |  Posted in Restaurants, appetizers, dessert, Dishing with Kathy Casey Blog, Foodie News, Fruit, Lifestyle, meats, poultry, Recent Posts, Recipes, seafood, sides, Snacks

Washington’s Rebecca Spence wins Grand Prize in the 2nd Annual Foster Farms Fresh Chicken Competition!

Congratulations to Vancouver, Washington’s Rebecca Spence for winning the grand prize of the 2nd Annual Foster Farms Fresh Chicken Competition! In the spirit of contest’s focus on fresh, local ingredients, her Crispy Orange Chicken with Fennel, Avocado and Orange Salad beat out nearly 2000 recipes to help her win the grand prize of $10,000 and a year’s worth of Foster Farms fresh chicken!

Check out the Washington, Oregon and California Regional Finalists’ recipes in the Foster Farms’ Contest Recipe Box for some tasty ideas and keep your out for next year’s Cooking Competition.

Posted by Kathy Casey on October 24th, 2011  |  Comments Off on Washington’s Rebecca Spence wins Grand Prize in the 2nd Annual Foster Farms Fresh Chicken Competition! |  Posted in Contests, Dishing with Kathy Casey Blog, Foodie News, poultry, Recent Posts, Recipes

Slow Cooking, Stellar Results!

As soon as the ratio of sun to cloud cover starts skewing in favor of crisp, overcast days and the wind is just a little more blustery, it instinctively feels like the right time to dust off the crock pot and start pondering some delicious, slow-cooked meals. Whether it’s a chilly weekend at home or a weekday where you leave for work and it’s dark out then you leave from work and it’s still dark out, slow-cooking offers the perfect way to enjoy a hearty, homey meal without too much fuss. The technique might be old-school, but the results will leave you feeling accomplished and your tummy warm and full! Not to mention how great your whole house will smell!

Slow cooking can be done a bunch of different ways – in an actual slow-cooker, crock pot, on the stove-top or even in place of traditional oven-braised recipes so there’s a method for everyone! It usually involves tougher, less expensive cuts of meat that are cooked at a lower temperature for longer periods of time so that they tenderize and mingle with the flavors of whatever you’re cooking with them!

Now, this isn’t a 2o minutes and you’re done kind of deal, but if you start your recipe in the morning, you can have a wonderful weeknight meal waiting for you when you get home! Or, do some extra on the weekend and you’ll have leftovers to warm up again later in the week; in fact, these types of dishes are often better reheated because the ingredients have had even more time to get to know each other. How d’lish does that sound!

Here are a few yummy slow-cook recipes to get you started, but the sky (and the season, of course) is the limit to what you can put on and let simmer away while you enjoy your autumn! – Kathy Casey

Fragrant Soy and Ginger Beef with Green Onions and Cabbage
Makes 6 servings

1 tablespoon vegetable oil
2-½ pounds beef brisket roast
2 slices fresh ginger root
3 cloves garlic
1 star anise pod
¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon
¼ cup brown sugar v ½ cup soy sauce
1 tablespoon rice wine vinegar
¼ teaspoon red chili flakes
1 yellow onion, peeled and cut in 6 wedges
1 very small head green cabbage, cut in 6 wedges
1 bunch green onions, ends trimmed off, cut in 2-inch pieces
2 tablespoons cornstarch

1. Heat oil in a large sauté pan over high heat. Place beef in pan, fat side down, and brown the first side. Turn over and brown the other side. Transfer beef to a non-corrosive bowl or baking dish.
2.
In a medium bowl, whisk together the ginger, garlic, star anise, cinnamon, brown sugar, soy, vinegar and chili flakes. Pour over the meat, turning to coat. Cover and refrigerate overnight.
3.
The next day, remove the meat from the dish and place in the bottom of the slow cooker (reserve marinade). Next, layer in the onion wedges, then the cabbage and green onions. You may need to push down the cabbage a bit to make it fit.
4.
Whisk the cornstarch into the reserved marinade until blended, then pour over the top. Cover tightly with the lid and set to cook on high. Cook undisturbed for about 8 to 9 hours.
5.
To serve, remove the cabbage and onions to a platter and the meat to a cutting board. Slice the meat against the grain and place on the platter. Spoon the sauce over the meat and vegetables.

Editor’s note: For slow cookers, the USDA recommends cutting large pieces of meat into smaller pieces because it could take too long to reach a safe cooking temperature. Thinner briskets can be cut in half.

©2003, Kathy Casey Food Studios.

Curry Chicken Thighs with Apples and Yogurt
Makes about 6 servings

1 cup apple juice
2 tablespoons cornstarch
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons curry powder
4 green cardamom seed pods, crushed
1 teaspoon coriander seeds
¼ teaspoon red chili flakes
2 teaspoons salt
2 tablespoons sugar
2 cups plain yogurt
3 pounds boneless, skinless chicken thighs
½ cup chopped onion
½ cup chopped celery
¼ cup dried black currants or raisins
2 Granny Smith apples, unpeeled, cored and cut in 6 wedges each
1 large red bell pepper, cut in 1-inch dice
Fresh Italian parsley, cilantro and mint, very coarsely chopped or torn
Steamed rice or potatoes as an accompaniment

1. In a large bowl whisk together the apple juice, cornstarch and flour until smooth. Then whisk in the curry powder, cardamom pods, coriander seeds, chili flakes, salt, sugar and yogurt.
2.
Add the chicken to the marinade and stir to combine. Place the mixture in the slow cooker and add in the following order: onion, celery, currants or raisins, apples and bell pepper. Cover, set cooker to high and cook for about 7 to 8 hours.
3.
Garnish with the fresh herbs. Serve with rice or potatoes.

©2003, Kathy Casey Food Studios.

Posted by Kathy Casey on October 28th, 2010  |  Comments Off on Slow Cooking, Stellar Results! |  Posted in Dishing with Kathy Casey Blog, meats, poultry, Recent Posts, Recipes

We have a winner … ok two! Foster Farms First Annual Chicken Cook Off

This week was the Foster Farms Washington Regional cooking contest finals. There were over 1,000 entries from Washington cooks and I am sure the job of narrowing it down to 5 was a tedious task!

After the tasty job of sampling the five Washington cooking contest finalists dishes,  judges Cynthia Nims, Jamie Peha and I turned in our ballots.

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Jamie, myself, and Cynthia just about ready to start our taste testing!

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My Food Studios crew cooked up all the dishes

After all the sampling, I want to congratulate both Marci Adelsman of Kent and Monica King of Vancouver! They each won $1,000!

They will now compete at the Finals in person on September 17, 2010, at the Culinary Institute of America at Greystone, in California’s Napa Valley. A $10,000 grand prize and one-year supply of fresh Foster Farms chicken will be awarded to the contest’s grand prize winner.

The two top dishes that are moving on to the finals are  Adelsman’s Brown Rice Chicken Salad

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and King’s Balsamic Mushroom Chicken with Honey Goat Cheese. The recipes featured fresh Foster Farms chicken and were inspired by local ingredients.

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For more than 70 years, Foster Farms has been working closely with more than 40 local, family-owned farms throughout Washington and Oregon to provide chicken to Washington families.
I hope you enjoy the finalist’s recipes as much as I did!

Brown Rice Chicken Salad
Recipe by Marci Adelsman, Kent, WA

Kathy’s Note: The colorful and tasty salad needs a snazzy name. Don’t let the plain name fool you – the salad is chock full of flavor and color!

This recipe makes about 8 – 10 cups and would serve 6 or more .

1 1/4 pounds Foster Farms chicken tenders
1/4 cup olive oil
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp black pepper
4 cups cooked brown rice
1 cup diced celery
1/2 cup diced red onion
1/4 cup chopped green onion
1 cup diced red bell pepper
1/2 cup toasted almonds, chopped
1/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese
1/4 cup dried cranberries
1/2 cup chopped fresh basil
1/3 cup chopped Italian parsley

Dressing:
1/2 cup olive oil
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 Tbls apple cider vinegar
2 Tbls honey
2 Tbls Dijon Mustard
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp black pepper

In medium size skillet over medium-high heat, warm olive oil.  Sprinkle chicken with salt and pepper, add to pan and sauté 4 minutes per side, until cooked through.  Remove chicken from pan and set aside.  When chicken is cooled, dice into 3/4” cubes.

In large serving bowl, combine brown rice, celery, red onion, green onion, red bell pepper, almonds, Parmesan cheese, cranberries, basil and parsley.  Stir well to combine.  In small bowl, combine olive oil, garlic, apple cider vinegar, honey and mustard.  Stir well to blend.  Add chicken to rice mixture.  Slowly add dressing to cover, tossing to coat well.  Sprinkle with salt and pepper; toss again to combine.

Balsamic Mushroom Chicken with Honey Goat Cheese
Recipe by Monica King, Vancouver, WA

Kathy’s note: An easy but elegant recipe for entertaining. This would be lovely made with wild chanterelle mushrooms this fall when they are in season.

6 Foster Farms chicken breast halves, boneless and skinless
1/4 cup canola oil
1 tsp salt
1/4 tsp black pepper
2 tsp chopped fresh thyme
1/2 cup balsamic vinegar
1 Tbls butter
1/2 cup goat cheese (4 oz package)
1 tsp honey

Mushroom topping:
2 Tbls canola oil
1 cup sliced mushrooms
1/4 tsp salt
1/8 tsp black pepper
1 tsp chopped fresh thyme

In large skillet over medium-high heat, warm canola oil.  Add mushrooms, salt and pepper and sauté, stirring, until mushrooms have given up liquid, about 7 minutes.  Remove mushrooms from skillet and place in medium bowl.  Add thyme, stir and cover with foil to keep warm.

Prepare chicken by warming canola oil in large skillet over medium-high heat.  Sprinkle chicken on both sides with salt, pepper and fresh thyme.  Place in pan and cook, turning, about 7 minutes per side, or until done throughout.  Remove from pan and place on plate; cover with foil to keep warm.

Lower temperature on stove to medium-low.  Add balsamic vinegar to the same skillet; deglaze pan, scraping up all browned bits.  Reduce heat to low and cook until vinegar reduces, about 3 minutes.  Stir in butter.  Pour glaze through a strainer and into small bowl.  Break up goat cheese into small crumbles, add honey and stir to combine.

To serve, place chicken breasts on platter and top with mushrooms.  Drizzle balsamic glaze over chicken and add honey goat cheese crumbles on top of mushrooms.

Check out all the finalist recipes from Washington, Oregon and California at Foster Farms Cooking Contest.

Posted by Kathy Casey on August 27th, 2010  |  Comments Off on We have a winner … ok two! Foster Farms First Annual Chicken Cook Off |  Posted in Contests, Dishing with Kathy Casey Blog, Foodie News, poultry, Recent Posts, Recipes

Turkey Talk – How to Avoid the Top 10 Turkey Sins!

If you missed the show, you can listen to it here!

The holidays are upon us and it’s time to start planning those holiday dinners for friends and family. Everyone has their favorites: from old-school marshmallow-topped sweet potatoes, to the classic green bean casserole. But for me it’s all about the turkey! Juicy and golden, it graces most of our holiday dinner tables. But, alas! there can be many turkey tragedies, “turkey sins” I call them. From the overcooked and dried out, to the not-fully-defrosted-and-then-baked-raw travesty! Zowie!

Ample planning and some good rules of thumb can ensure a low-stress turkey roasting day. Below, I’ll walk you through the 10 turkey sins, and provide tips on how to have a d’lish holiday meal.

Turkey Sin #1: Roasting a Half-Frozen Bird
If you’re buying a standard bird at the grocery store, take into consideration most of these babies are frozen or “half” frozen. The rule of thumb is: you should start defrosting your bird in the refrigerator about 5 days in advance—up to 7 if it’s a biggie! If you can order one fresh, then great; get your order in at least 2+ weeks ahead at your favorite market or butcher/poultry shop. Remember to get to “know your turkey” – if your going for local and free range it will cook a bit quicker (and need more seasoning) than a traditional “plumped” turkey.

Turkey Sin #2: Leaving the Bag of Giblets in the Bird
How many of you have seen these left in during baking!? Once your bird is ready for the big day, take it out of the wrapper. Remove the bag of “goodies and giblets” from inside, and also check inside the neck cavity. (NO body wants a turkey “butt” surprise). You can use the neck and giblets to make a little pan of turkey stock for adding to gravy if you like.

Turkey Sin #3: “Steaming”, Rather than Roasting, your Bird
Roasting your turkey in a big old deep roasting pan creates steam from the turkey juices and does not make for a crispy-skinned bird. To avoid this, rinse your turkey inside and out; then pat it dry. Place in a wide shallow pan, up on a roasting rack. Stick some aromatics, such as quartered onions, an orange, and a few big sprigs of fresh herbs, such as thyme, sage and rosemary, in the inside cavity.

Turkey Sin #4: Underseasoning
All the gravy and cranberry sauce in Plymouth Rock can’t hide an underseasoned bird. You can carefully stuff fun things, like fresh sage leaves, sprigs of thyme, fresh basil leaves, and small tufts of rosemary, under the turkey’s skin but watch out for tears in the skin. Herbs will add a nice flavor to the meat. Season your turkey liberally with kosher salt and fresh-ground black pepper – or I love to use my Dish D’Lish French Seasoning Salt! This means really season it well—rub it all over, under the wings, on the back of the bird—massage that baby! For a medium-sized turkey, you want to use at least 1 tablespoon of kosher salt plus about 1 teaspoon of pepper or about 2 Tbsp of my Dish D’Lish French Seasoning Salt.

Turkey Sin #5: An Undercooked or Overcooked Bird
Undercook your bird, and put your guests at risk. Overcook your bird, and you’ll need to offer guests a LOT of wine for washing it down…which could lead to family drama! Cooking your bird just right is tricky. To start with, there are a million different methods. I’m a roasted-turkey gal, but I know there are lots of you turkey-fryers out there. And it does make a good bird (but beware of garage fires!) —but I gotta have my gravy. To keep it simple, get yourself a good instant-read thermometer and be sure to preheat your oven. See my favorite recipe and tips, below, for roasting. To avoid overcooking your bird, plan your day. When are you serving dinner? Work back from there. Unless you are cooking a 40-lb monster turkey or eating dinner at 11 AM, there is no need to get the bird in the oven at 6 AM!! Yes, I have succumbed to eating one of those roasted-for-8-hours birds, and it wasn’t pretty! Turkey sin #5-B note- do not leave the thermometer in the bird when you are roasting it – see sample below….

Themometer1

Turkey Sin #6: An Improperly Carved Turkey
After all that hard work put into creating a picture-perfect, delicious-tasting bird, do not let the knife get into inexperienced hands! It may be tradition to let the man of the house perform the ceremonious carve, but not if he’s going to hack it to death (Family Note: seen at the in-laws frequently- for God sakes just let me do it)! Give the bird 20 minutes to rest. This will allow you to get the rest of the dinner on the table. To start carving, take off the breast first, and slice thin. Disjoint the legs, thighs, and wings and slice the thighs if desired. My in-laws use an electric knife (it was probably a wedding gift from the 60’s!) and, actually, the thing works pretty darn well. I favor my super-sharp Hinkel chef’s knife. But, hey! use whatever gets you the nicest slices.

Turkey Sin #7: Not Enough Gravy
Gravy and turkey is like milk and cookies: delightfully harmonious. To be sure you make enough, immediately transfer your roasted bird to a platter to rest, and collect all those yummy juices for making pan gravy. Or, what I like to do is make turkey stock a few days ahead using some purchased turkey legs and then make a big batch of gravy in the bird-cooking pan. There’s nothing worse than not enough gravy! I like my do ahead gravy recipe below – and it makes LOTS!

Turkey Sin #8: Letting the Cooked Bird Sit Out…. All Day… and beyond
Once you have the meat off the bird, remember to not let it sit on the counter all evening, increasing the risk of spoilage. I like to take off any extra meat and refrigerate it for soups or sandwiches. Don’t throw away that turkey carcass! Break it up, throw it in a big pot, cover with water and bring to a simmer. Simmer for about 1–2 hours. Strain the stock well, then cool. Now you have yummy turkey broth to make some tasty soup later in the week.

Turkey Sin #9: No Turkey Leftovers for Sandwiches
And this brings us to the sin second only to not making enough gravy: not cooking enough turkey. Turkey sandwiches—I love them piled high with homemade cranberry compote—are absolutely de rigueur for next-day snacking … or midnight refrigerator raids, for those who cannot wait! So if you’re inviting your peeps over for dinner –encourage people to bring some their own Tupperware –  give them some leftovers …. it will make for very happy guests and less to cram in the already packed refrigerator!

Turkey Sin #10: Not Enjoying Yourself
Running around the kitchen like a turkey with its head cut off is no way to enjoy the holiday. Don’t allow the day to consume you. Why not give each person something to bring to the dinner? Maybe even send them a recipe you would like them to make. The holidays are all about gathering over a meal, so get those football-watchers off the couch and into the kitchen. Get your guests involved by setting the table, pouring drinks, warming the rolls, anything to help. You’ll relax more and create lasting memories with your family and friends.

One of my favorite turkey-roasting methods follows, so whether you are a first-time cooker or an old hand at the turkey game, I hope my tips and recipes will allow you to have a super-successful holiday meal!

Kathy’s Herb-Lacquered Roasted Turkey
Chef’s Notes:  Read recipe all the way through a few days before your dinner. A tasty do-ahead turkey gravy that makes LOTS follows.

Allow about 1 1/2 hours’ roasting time for a 12-pound turkey (that is totally defrosted and not stuffed), and add about 5 to 10 minutes for each additional pound. This will be one of the most beautiful turkeys you’ve ever roasted!
If roasting a large turkey 20 – 24 lbs, bake at 350 degrees. A 22-lb turkey should take about 2 1/2 – 3 hours to reach 175–180 degrees internal temperature (insert an instant-read thermometer in the back side of the thigh- not sutffed).

Makes 8 to 16 servings, with leftovers

1 12- to 16-pound turkey
4 or more large, fresh rosemary sprigs
1 large onion, skin on, quartered
1 head of garlic, broken apart
8 large sage leaves
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 tablespoon kosher salt + 1/2 – 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
OR 2 + tablespoons Dish D’Lish French Seasoning Salt

Place an oven rack low in the oven, removing extra racks if necessary. Preheat oven to 375°F.
Remove the giblets and neck from turkey cavities, checking that both cavities are empty. Rinse turkey with cold water, inside and out, and pat dry. Keep the legs tied together with the metal clip, or tie with butcher’s twine.
Place half of the rosemary sprigs and all the onion and garlic in the bird’s body cavity.

(If you decide to stuff your turkey with traditional stuffing there are some things you must know: When stuffing a turkey, do so just before roasting; do not stuff it the night before. Loosely stuff the turkey so that the stuffing will completely cook through. Do not pack the stuffing. You can stuff both ends of a turkey, the large inside cavity and the smaller nook under the skin flap at the neck – cooking time may need to be increased.)

Pull the leaves off the remaining rosemary sprigs. Carefully loosen the turkey skin over the breast and legs (by running your hands under it), being careful not to tear it. Keeping them as flat as possible, tuck the sage leaves and the rosemary leaves you pulled off under the breast, thigh, and leg skin, arranging the herbs decoratively. Carefully pull the breast skin tightly down over breast bone, then, using metal closure skewers, thread them through both sides of the skin flaps to bridge the turkey body-cavity opening. Thread skewers alternately from left to right then right to left. With a 12-inch piece of butcher’s twine or white cotton string, work back and forth around the skewers to lace up the cavity, shoelace-style.
Spray a roasting rack with nonstick vegetable spray and place the turkey on the rack in an open, shallow roasting pan. Rub the turkey all over with the olive oil, then generously sprinkle the turkey with the salt and pepper or French Seasoning Salt, seasoning it well all over.
Place the turkey on the low oven rack and roast until the inner, thickest part of the thigh registers 175°F. (Insert metal stem, instant-read thermometer in the back side of thigh by the turkey body.)
If you are cooking a larger turkey, you may need to tent the breast loosely with a piece of buttered foil to avoid over-browning of the breast. About 30 to 45 minutes before the end of cooking, remove tent to allow browning.
When the turkey is done, remove from the oven. Before carving the turkey, let it stand for 15 minutes to allow the juices to settle. As the turkey stands, the turkey thigh temperature will reach 180°F. (If stuffing be sure stuffing comes to 165°F) Use the pan drippings to make your gravy – see recipe below.
© Copyright 2009 by Kathy Casey Food Studios® blogging at Dishing with Kathy CaseyTwitter 

Old-Fashioned Turkey Mushroom Gravy- THAT MAKES A LOT!
Makes 10 cups, or about 20 generous 1/2-cup servings
You can make this a few days ahead and then re-heat in your turkey roasting pan for extra turkey flavor goodness! Read through the entire recipe before starting.

12 tablespoons (1 1/2 sticks) butter
1 teaspoon minced fresh rosemary – or 1/2 teaspoon dried rosemary, crushed
8 ounces (4 cups) thinly sliced mushrooms, or chopped wild mushrooms
1 cup flour
10 cups Rich Turkey Stock (recipe follows)
2 teaspoons salt
1/2 teaspoon white pepper

Melt the butter in a large, heavy saucepan. Add the rosemary and mushrooms and sauté over medium-high heat for about 2 minutes. Add the flour and stir vigorously until combined and smooth. Cook for about 1 minute. Add the stock all at once and whisk vigorously so as to eliminate any lumps. Reduce the heat and simmer for about 10 minutes, until the gravy is nicely thickened. Season with salt and white pepper.

You can make the gravy a couple of days ahead to save yourself some precious holiday time!

Then right before serving- and while your turkey is set aside to rest – ready your turkey roasting pan full of turkey goodness: remove excess fat from your turkey roasting pan. Place the pan over a burner – add a big splash of white wine, champagne, potato cooking water, chicken broth or water. Using a metal spatula – scrape up all the goodies in the bottem of the pan… this is the turkey goodness. Then add your prepared Turkey Mushroom gravy – whisk well and heat till hot. Serve up and enjoy – you’ll have lots of gravy for all!

Rich Turkey Stock
Makes about 10 cups

2 large turkey legs or thighs, about 2 pounds total
1 yellow onion, unpeeled, coarsely chopped
1 large or 2 medium carrots, cut into large chunks
Up to 2 cups mushroom stems, optional
4 stalks celery, cut into chunks
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
1 bay leaf
1/2 cup white wine
12 cups water

Preheat an oven to 400°F.
Roast the turkey pieces in a baking pan for 45 minutes to 1 hour, until the skin is golden brown. Place them in an 8-quart pot and add the vegetables and seasonings. Deglaze the roasting pan with the wine, scraping the pan well to loosen browned bits, and add to the pot. Add the water.
Place the pot over medium-high heat and bring to a rapid simmer. Reduce the heat to low and lightly simmer for 45 minutes to 1 hour. Strain the stock and skim off any fat. Discard the vegetables. (Most of the flavor will have cooked out of the turkey; however, the meat can be removed from the bones and saved for another use.)
© Copyright 2009 by Kathy Casey Food Studios® blogging at Dishing with Kathy CaseyTwitter

Posted by Kathy Casey on November 19th, 2009  |  Comments Off on Turkey Talk – How to Avoid the Top 10 Turkey Sins! |  Posted in Dishing with Kathy Casey Blog, KOMO Radio, poultry, Recent Posts, Recipes

Wild Hibiscus

My prediction is that in the near future, you will be seeing hibiscus flavor popping up everywhere. Let’s just say: Hibiscus is the new black! Until recently, hibiscus has most commonly been used in the culinary field as a tea. However, there are a lot of fun ways to use this elegant flavor in drinks, desserts and entrees as well. Available in most latin markets, you can buy it dried and make some fantastic infusions. Or to make some fun drinks, I recommend Monin’s Hibiscus flavored syrup; try a new twist on a flavored lemonade or Italian soda! Hibiscus flavor can also be a great accompaniment to savory dishes as well, check out my recipe below for a great crostini with brie and hibiscus flowers in syrup and chicken skewers.

 

For those of you who are unfamiliar with the Hibiscus flavor, when boiled down into a syrup it gives a sweet, rhubarb-raspberry flavor. The color is an inviting magenta that adds that chicness to any drink or dish.

 

One product I really like is Wild Hibiscus flowers in syrup. They are 100% natural from Australia and are super fun as a garnish to a drink or atop a cheesecake to make an elegant dessert, or even in a salad. Check out the Wild Hibiscus website for some more information about these beautiful and tasty treats. Telephone 800-499-8490 or email bubbles@wildhibiscus.com

 

Hibiscus is popping up in all kinds of products too, even in tequila! We just received a hot new product called Gran Centinario Roseangel. It is a respesado tequila aged in port barrels that are rubbed with hibiscus. This is only available in certain states at this time so be on the look out for it!

 

Hibiscus Rum Punch

 

Makes about 10 cups, enough for 12 to 14 servings

 

6 cups boiling water

1/2 cup dried hibiscus flowers

1 cup honey

2 cups white or spiced rum

1 cup fresh lime juice

1/2 teaspoon Angostura bitters (optional)

 

For garnishing

Lime wheels or edible flowers

 

In a medium nonreactive saucepan, bring the water to a boil and add the hibiscus flowers. Remove from heat and let steep for 10 minutes. Strain the hibiscus tea into a large heat-proof container or pitcher and discard the solids. Stir in the honey. Place in refrigerator to chill. When mixture is cold, stir in the rum, lime juice, and bitters, if using. The punch keeps, covered and refrigerated, for up to 4 days.

 

To serve, fill tall or old-fashioned glasses to the top with ice. Pour in about 3/4 cup (6 fluid ounces) of punch. Garnish as desired.

 

Recipe from Sips & Apps, © 2009 by Kathy Casey, reprinted by permission of Chronicle Book

 

 

 

crostini

Hibiscus, Warm Brie & Almond Crostini

Makes 20 to 24 pieces

 

1 jar (250g) Wild Hibiscus Flowers in Syrup

1 small (8-oz) wheel brie cheese

20 to 24 1/4-inch-thick diagonal slices baguette (about 1 baguette)

3/4 cup sliced almonds, with skin

Garnish: fresh thyme or snipped chives

 

Preheat oven to 450° F. Drain hibiscus flowers and reserve syrup. Cut each flower in half.

 

Cut the brie into 1/4-inch-thick slices sized to cover about three quarters of a baguette slice. Spread the almonds in a flat dish. Press the brie firmly onto the bread slices then, facedown, into the almonds. Place on a baking sheet. Bake until the brie is soft, bread is crispy, and nuts are lightly toasted, about 4 to 6 minutes. Top each one with a piece of hibiscus and drizzle lightly with the reserved syrup* as desired. Garnish with herbs. Serve immediately.

 

*To thicken the syrup, put it in a small saucepan and bring to a boil over high heat. Then reduce the heat to medium and cook until syrup is reduced by 1/3 or coats the back of a spoon. Syrup will thicken more as it cools.

 

Note: for a tasty variation try this recipe with Cambozola – a mild brie-like blue cheese.

 

Recipe by Kathy Casey for Wild Hibiscus ©2009

 

Chicken skewers 

 

Grilled Chicken & Hibiscus Skewers with Sassy Ginger Dipping Sauce

Makes 4 skewers

 

1 jar (250g) Wild Hibiscus Flowers in Syrup

1 Tbsp. finely minced or grated fresh ginger

1/2 to 1 tsp. hot sauce

3 green onions (scallions)

1 to1 1/4 lb. boneless, skinless chicken breast, cut into 32 pieces

vegetable oil as needed

salt and pepper

4 metal skewers or 10″ heavy wood skewers soaked in water

 

Drain hibiscus flowers, reserving syrup in a small bowl.

 

To make the dipping sauce: Mix ginger and hot sauce into the reserved syrup.

 

Trim and cut each green onion into 4 pieces. Thread each skewer as follows: 2 pieces of chicken, 1 piece of green onion, then 1 hibiscus flower*; repeat twice; then finish with 2 pieces of chicken. Lightly brush skewers with oil and season to taste with salt and pepper.

 

Preheat grill to medium-high. Cook skewers until chicken is cooked through, about 4 to 5 minutes per side. Drizzle skewers with dipping sauce and serve extra on the side.

 

*Cut one flower in half if needed; jars contain approximately 11–12 flowers.

 

Recipe by Kathy Casey for Wild Hibiscus ©2009

 

 

 

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