Posts filed under 'other'

Delicious Seasonal Squash

I love winter squash! I love its texture, sweetness, and most of all its versatility. It’s great in soups, stuffed in ravioli or made into a tart! You don’t just have to roast it in the oven with brown sugar – although how d’lish does that sound?

And it’s not just all about the beloved butternut or Danish squash, either. There are tons of different varieties of squash to choose from: gold nugget, turbans, Hubbards and sweet dumplings… and each one varies in colors, flavors, and textures.

Delicious Squash
These are beautiful squash that was at the Farmers Market on Magnolia

Take for example spaghetti squash.  Its name comes from their near spaghetti-like flesh! Just cut it in half place cut side on a baking dish with a little water and bake till tender. Once cooked, fork out its spaghetti-like flesh then serve it up with a delicious red sauce. Presto! You’ve got a tasty gluten-free veggie dinnertime hit!

Jack Be Little squash, the tiniest member of the squash line up, are excellent roasted whole (seeds scooped out first) then rubbed with olive oil and seasonings and baked till tender. With these little guys you can even eat the tender skin. I like to roast them and then serve filled with other fall veggies such as sautéed brussel sprouts with bacon and a little maple syrup. Yum!

One of my favorite squash creations for fall entertaining is Spiced Butternut Squash Hummus. Now that’s a fun new idea. Serve with pita chips, crostini or fresh veggies for dipping. It is also a great spread for a turkey sandwich!

I’ll leave you with one more tip. If you happen upon a giant squash and have no idea how to get into it, place it in a garbage bag and then sling it the ground as hard as you can–voila your squash is cracked open now!  -Kathy

Spiced Butternut Squash Hummus
Makes about 3 1/2 – 4 cups

1 small butternut squash, about 2 1/2 pounds
3/4 cup drained cooked or canned garbanzo beans
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 teaspoons minced fresh garlic
3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1/4 cup tahini (sesame paste)
1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
2 tablespoons chopped cilantro (optional)
Garnishes: olive oil for drizzling, chopped parsley or cilantro, and pomegranate seeds

Preheat an oven to 325 degrees F.

Cut squash in half and remove seeds. Cut squash into 8 wedges. Brush with olive oil and roast on a pan-sprayed baking sheet, uncovered, for 1 1/2 hours or until very tender. The squash should brown a little. Let cool. Scrape out the cooked squash meat with a large metal spoon; discard the skins. You should have about 3 cups cooked squash meat. (You can prepare up to this point 2 days in advance and keep refrigerated.)

In a food processor, process the garbanzo beans until coarsely chopped (about 1 minute). Then add the roasted squash and remaining ingredients, and process until smooth.

Serve drizzled with olive oil, sprinkled with parsley and garnished with fresh pomegranate seeds if desired.

Recipe by Kathy Casey Food Studios®

1 comment November 1st, 2012

Chasing Wild Mushrooms: Remembering Patrice benson

Why do I wish for rain every fall? Because as soon as it begins, our Northwest grounds moisten and the magic begins. Local wild mushrooms start to pop up! Chanterelles, the fragrant matsutake, cauliflower mushroom (its genus name is Sparassis but it does look like a big cauliflower), angel wings, hedgehog, oyster … the Pacific Northwest has a bounty of edibles yours for the finding. Wild mushroom foraging is one of my favorite activities during the fall season.

Matsutake
Tasty matsutake mushrooms – nom nom nom!

I have been a huge foraging enthusiast for years. It’s how I met fellow mycophagist (mushroom eater/lover) Patrice Benson, who let me tag along through the years to her secret mushroom-picking spots. Of course, I never know exactly where we are going because, like any good mushroom hunter, Patrice would never tell me exactly where we were.  Lucky for her, I’m so directionally challenged that I wouldn’t be able to find my way back if I tried!

For over 20 years, Patrice shared her amazing mushroom knowledge with local enthusiasts and chefs, teaching everyone the ins and outs of seeking wild mushrooms. Patrice passed on recently but I know she will be with us in spirit this year as we seek out the first of the season’s mushrooms.

Patrice Benson
Dear friend Patrice Benson with a bounty of mushrooms! Look at all those Chanterelles!
Thank you, Patrice, for sharing your wonderful knowledge with me and so many others.

If you’re curious about foraging but have never been before, I highly recommend checking out the Puget Sound Mycological Society.  They have scores of info for wild mushroom lovers of all backgrounds. From budding beginners to seasoned professionals, the PSMS has all sorts of activities and programs to keep you hunting!

Speaking of activities, this weekend is the annual Puget Sound Wild Mushroom Show held at the Mountaineers Club (located in Seattle’s Magnusson Park), where there will be hundreds of species exhibited. The PSMS has put on a wild mushroom festival every year since 1964. Their two-day fair is one of the largest in North America.

There’ll be guest speakers, program/membership info, an art contest and of course cooking demos! I’ll be cooking up some wild mushroom fun on Sunday (Oct.14) from 2-4 pm — and sharing my “When I Found the Mother Load” story. General Admission is $10 and fun for all ages!

Don’t fret if you can’t make out to the show! There is another great opportunity for wild mushroom foragers – the 27th Annual Breitenbush Mushroom Gathering! Held at the Breitenbush Hot Springs on October 18th – 21st, attendees will focus on the diversity of the wild mushrooms in the Pacific Northwest and the many functions that mushrooms have for both humans and the natural world.

Whether it’s in the woods or from your favorite farmers market, use up this season’s chanterelles in my Savory Chanterelle Bread Pudding one of my favorite wild mushroom recipes.

If you do get a chance to go mushroom hunting, pack up some extra ingredients (as well as rustic breads and a bottle of wine!), a cast iron skillet, a few other staple ingredients and a portable burner – then try making my Wild Mushroom Ragout after pulling in your day’s bounty of mushrooms. So yummy slathered over thick slices of rustic bread and a glass of vino after an exhilarating day roaming the woods for the big find.

So to all you mycophagists out there, here’s to a fun and fruitful season of wild mushroom foraging! -Kathy

Savory Chanterelle Bread Pudding
It is important to use a rustic-style bread for this recipe—not airy bread.

Mushroom Bread Pudding
(Photo from Kathy Casey’s Northwest Table, Chronicle Books)

Makes 6 to 8 servings

1 Tbsp olive oil or butter
2 cups cleaned and sliced chanterelles (about 10 ounces)
1/2 cup diced onion
1/3 cup diced celery
1 Tbsp minced fresh garlic
4 cups 1-inch-cubed firm, rustic French- or Italian-style bread
1 1/2 Tbsps minced fresh sage
1 Tbsp minced fresh thyme or lemon thyme
1 1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp black pepper
1 1/2 cups half-and-half
1 1/2 cups milk
2 eggs
2 egg yolks

Preheat an oven to 325°F. Heat the oil in a large sauté pan or skillet over medium-high heat. Sauté the chanterelles and onion for 3 to 4 minutes, or until three-quarters done. Add the celery and sauté for about 1 1/2 to 2 minutes more. Add the garlic and sauté for 30 seconds more, taking care not to burn the garlic. Remove from the heat.

Combine the bread cubes, herbs, salt, and pepper in a large bowl. Mix in the cooked mushroom mixture and set aside.

Butter a 6-cup glass or ceramic baking dish or spray with vegetable-oil cooking spray.

Whisk the half-and-half, milk, eggs, and egg yolks in a medium bowl. Pour the egg mixture into the bread mixture and mix gently and thoroughly. Transfer the mixture to the baking dish and level out the surface, lightly pressing the bread down into the dish.

Bake for 50 to 60 minutes, or until the custard is just set in the center. Do not overbake or the custard will scramble.

Recipe from Kathy Casey’s Northwest Table, Chronicle Books

Wild Mushroom Ragout
My Wild Mushroom Ragout – that’s a 12-inch cast iron skillet…making that Boletus huge!
This is from my first book Pacific Northwest the Beautiful in 1993. Patrice picked these mushrooms for the photo shoot!

Wild Mushroom Ragout
From my first cook book – this recipe is still one of my favorites to enjoy after a long day of foraging. For a very rich flavor soak a few dried wild mushrooms such as Morels or Boletous (Cepes) in the brandy or sherry, then add to simmering ragout. Serve ragout in a big cast iron skillet and spread it on toasted rustic bread, or serve it over grilled fish or roasted chicken or pork.

For making out on your foraging trip take some butter or olive oil, some fresh herbs, onion, garlic, a half pint of heavy cream and a little jar of sherry brandy and white wine mixed together, a lemon and some seasoning — delete the stock. Pack a portable burner, cast iron skillet, a spoon, small cutting board, knife and a loaf of rustic bread. And wish for lot’s of mushrooms.

Makes about 6 servings

4 Tbsps butter
1 cup thinly sliced white onion
2 pounds mushrooms, quartered or sliced (a mixture of local fresh wild mushrooms, if available)
1 Tbsp fresh garlic, minced
2 tsp fresh thyme
1 1/2 tsp minced fresh rosemary or fresh mixed herbs such as thyme, chives and basil
1/4 cup chicken, or mushroom stock, (more or less as needed)
3 Tbsps sherry
2 Tbsps brandy (optional)
1 cup heavy cream
2-3 tsp lemon juice
1/2 tsp salt
1/8 tsp fresh ground black pepper
2 Tbsps chopped fresh parsley (optional)

In a large heavy bottomed skillet or small brazing pan. Melt butter over moderately high heat, add onions, mushrooms and garlic. Cook mixture, stirring often till mushrooms and onions are softened about 3-4 minutes. Add herbs, stock, sherry and brandy. Reduce till only a little liquid remains about 5 minutes or more depending upon if your mushrooms have a lot of moisture in them.

Add whipping cream and cook till mixture is a nice lightly thickened about 3-5 minutes. Add lemon juice. Cook for a couple more minutes. Season and stir in parsley.

Recipe © Kathy Casey Food Studios

Add comment October 13th, 2012

Savory Bite-Sized Morsels: Sliders!

Good things do come in small packages; sliders are a tasty example of that testament. These two-bite (sometimes one-bite!) wonders are popping up everywhere from restaurant menus to food trucks!

If you’re a slider fan and want to make them at home, don’t worry! They are super-simple to make. Belltown’s Macrina Bakery makes fresh, little slider-sized buns and there are grocery store mini-bun options and alternatives, too.

Lamb Sliders

Lamb sliders!
(Photo from Kathy Casey’s Sips & Apps, Chronicle Books – Angie Norwood Browne)

Lamb, salmon, buffalo, tuna, sliced steak … anything gourmet burgers can do, sliders can do. They aren’t your average burgers and flavor combos are endless from barbecue pulled pork on ‘slaw to deep-fried clam fritters with a citrus aioli.

For your next get-together, set-up a DIY slider bar. Put out a few different mini-patties, some great local mini-buns, and lots of fun condiments – spicy chipotle mayo, horseradish aioli, blue cheese, tarragon mustard, pickled red onions, zingy slaw, and even grilled pineapple – yum!

For the last days of summer, think small and dish out big flavor with sliders! -Kathy

Lamb Sliders with Zingy Spread and Arugula & Roasted Peppers
I also like to top the hot burgers with dollops of soft goat cheese for a tasty variation.

Makes 16

Zingy Spread
3/4 cup mayonnaise, or use 3/8 cup mayonnaise and 3/8 cup plain yogurt
1 1/2 tablespoons whole-grain mustard
1 teaspoon prepared horseradish
1 tablespoon minced fresh garlic

Burger Mixture
3/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
2 teaspoons minced fresh rosemary
3 tablespoons minced onion
2 teaspoons minced fresh garlic
1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1 1/2 pounds ground lamb, or substitute beef

Accompaniments
16 small slider buns
Thinly sliced red or sweet onions
Roasted peppers, cut in strips
Baby arugula

To make the spread: Mix the ingredients together well. Cover and refrigerate, for up to 2 days, until needed.

To make the burger mixture: In a bowl, mix the pepper, mustard, rosemary, onion, garlic, vinegar, and salt. Mix in the lamb until thoroughly combined. Divide the mixture into 16 portions. Shape into patties, about 2 inches in diameter.

Heat a medium or large nonstick skillet or sauté pan over medium-high to high heat. Working in batches without crowding the pan, sauté the patties until just done, about 2 -3 minutes per side. (You can also grill the patties)

If you want to serve the buns warm, wrap them in aluminum foil and reheat in a 375-degree F oven.

To serve, split the buns and spread with the Zingy Spread. Place the patties on buns and top with onions, roasted peppers and arugula as desired. Close the burgers and secure with picks.

Recipe adapted from; Kathy Casey Sips & Apps, Chronicle Books

Add comment September 14th, 2012

Salad Dressings

I love salads: they’re quick, easy and can be pretty healthy, whether as a side or a main dish. Aside from great greens and goodies, for me, the dressing is what can make an amazing salad.

Whether you love thick, creamy style dressings or a-barely-there vinaigrette, the possibilities truly are endless for making a simple plate of greens wow-worthy.

One of my favorite dressings – creamy blue cheese – gets even more d’lish in my Blue Cheese & Beer Dressing with the addition of Oregon’s Rogue River blue cheese and a splash of local ale. Or, how about bringing back a bit of retro with creamy avocado and tarragon Green Goddess Dressing?

For a sweet and tangy salad dressing, try my Blackberry Honey Vinaigrette. Fresh blackberries, honey, a pinch of cayenne, red wine vinegar and olive oil play well together, coating your grateful greens in a touch of summer – and perfect sprinkled with local berries, dollops of goat cheese and a few toasted Northwest hazelnuts.

It’s easy to make a great vinaigrette with my DIY Vinaigrette Guide. Mix and match your ingredients, depending on what flavors you’re looking for and then enjoy over some tasty greens and salad add-ins. But don’t forget to get creative and think outside of the box!

So jazz up plain old salad with some delicious dressing and you’ll love your greens even more! -Kathy

Blue Cheese & Beer Dressing
Great drizzled over romaine lettuce leaves topped with bay shrimp, chopped egg and toasted hazelnuts or almonds!

Makes 2 cups

1 cup mayonnaise
1/2 cup sour cream
1/2 cup (2 ounces) crumbled blue cheese
1 tablespoon very finely minced onion
3/4 teaspoon minced garlic
1 1/2 teaspoons chopped Italian parsley, optional
1/2 teaspoon Worcestershire
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1/4 teaspoon Tabasco
3/4 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons full-flavored beer, such as a Pike Place Brewery’s Kilt Lifter

Place all ingredients in a food processor. Pulse until ingredients are mixed and cheese chunks are slightly broken up but not puréed.

Recipe by Kathy Casey Food Studios®

Green Goddess Dressing
Makes 2 cups

1 ripe avocado (reserve pit)
2 egg yolks
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons thinly sliced fresh chives
2 tablespoons minced parsley
2 tablespoons minced fresh tarragon
1 shallot, minced
4 anchovy fillets
1/3 cup olive oil
1/2 cup sour cream
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1/4 teaspoon salt

In a food processor, place the avocado, egg yolks, lemon juice, herbs, shallot, and anchovies and process for 1 minute until well combined. With the machine running, slowly drizzle in the oil. The mixture should become smooth and creamy. Turn the machine off and scrape down the sides. Add the sour cream, pepper, and salt and process for 30 seconds more.

Place mixture in a container and submerge the avocado pit to help the dressing keep its green color. Lay a piece of plastic wrap directly on the dressing’s surface and cover well. Dressing will keep, refrigerated, for up to 4 days.

Recipe by Kathy Casey Food Studios®

Blackberry Honey Vinaigrette
If berries are out of season, substitute frozen berries in the dressing and omit the fresh berries in the salad, using fresh fruit such as peaches, apples or pears are a great substitution. The dressing is also great made with raspberries.

Makes enough for 4 servings

1/4 cup fresh (or frozen) blackberries
2 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 Tbsp Liquid Kitchen™ No. 5130 honey or local honey
1 tsp Dijon mustard
3 Tbsp olive oil
Pinch cayenne pepper
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt

Combine all the vinaigrette ingredients in a blender or food processor and process until smooth. Refrigerate until needed. Can be made up to 3 days in advance.

Recipe by Kathy Casey Food Studios®

DIY Vinaigrette Guide
Experiment with different flavorings and combinations for your vinaigrette. Also try out various greens and salad additions, such as nuts, fruits, cheeses, meats and seafood.

Acid 1/4 – 1/3 cup Any of the following or a combination equaling 1/4 cup:lemon juice

lime juice

cider vinegar

balsamic vinegar

red wine vinegar

white wine vinegar

rice wine vinegar

Sweetness(optional) 1 – 3 teaspoons honeysugar

agave nectar

Dijon mustard 2 teaspoons
Kosher salt 3/4 teaspoon (use less if adding cheese or olives)
Oil 3/4 cup Any of the following or a combination equaling 3/4 cup:mild-tasting vegetable oil, such as canola

olive oil, extra-virgin olive oil

nut oils, such as hazelnut or walnut oil (do not use nut oils for more than half of total oil)

Flavorings as desired black pepper, pinch of cayenne pepper1 tablespoon grated lemon, lime or orange zest (colored part only—no white pith)

1 tablespoon chopped mild fresh herbs (basil, tarragon, chives, oregano, cilantro)

1 1/2 teaspoons chopped strong fresh herbs (thyme, rosemary, marjoram)

2 to 3 tablespoons grated parmesan cheese, crumbled blue cheese or feta cheese

2 tablespoons chopped calamata olives, sun dried tomatoes or roasted peppers

2 to 3 teaspoons finely minced fresh garlic

2 to 3 teaspoons finely minced fresh ginger

2 teaspoons poppy seeds

1 tablespoon Asian-style sesame oil

1 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds

1 tablespoon finely minced shallots

2 tablespoons thinly sliced green onions

1 teaspoon hot chili paste or hot sauce

With a small wire whisk, in a small bowl, whisk together your acid component, (and sweet component, if using) Dijon mustard and salt. Then slowly whisk in the oil, adding it in a thin drizzle. This technique is to emulsify (make smooth and combined) your dressing. Then add your flavoring components.

You can keep the vinaigrette refrigerated for up to 2 weeks. Whisk up well before each use. Toss with your favorite greens.

Recipe by Kathy Casey Food Studios®

Add comment July 5th, 2012

Dishing with Kathy Casey: The Newsletter

Hello Sunshine!

After a busy winter and spring we are happy to welcome some summer sunshine and have lots of exciting projects and trips on the horizon. Here is a little of what we have been up to since our last newsletter.

Kissy Face Logo

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Tasty Travels

Since my trip back from Ukraine, I had about a week to relax at home before heading out again. This time my travels lead me to Ocean Shores, Washington to host the 6th Annual Razor Clam Festival! Ocean Shores is a small beach town on the coast of Washington; about a 3-hour drive away from the hustle and bustle of Seattle. Every year they celebrate this illustrious clam with a fun and tasty festival, from Blood Mary and beer booths, to arts and crafts, and of course a clam chowder cook-off. My team and I judged both the amateur and professional chowder cook-offs and seriously tasted over 45 chowders to choose the grand prize winners. Needless to say we were stuffed to the gills with chowder by the end of the day!

Clam Chowder judges
Heather, Erwin and I tasting the first group of chowders!

Then it was off to California’s Napa Valley with teammates Heather and new sous-chef Jason for the Flavor Summit! Held at the prestigious Culinary Institute of America at Greystone, this industry-only event brings in the top leaders in the culinary world to discuss and taste their way through flavor-related topics. The campus is amazing and the seminars were enlightening! I attended with my client Paramount Citrus. We participated in the lunch, cooking up a Sweet Orange, Fennel and Arugula Salad with Citrus Grilled Shrimp and my Market Fresh Lime Agua Fresca with Berries (see below for the recipe). For the ending reception we crafted Liquid Kitchen Ultimate G & T’s (Gin and Tonics), topped with a Cucumber Lime Foam and a grating of lime zest.

Limes
Squeezing out some Paramount Limes for my Ultimate G & T!

Then it was off to Los Angeles again. This time for business meetings mixed in with some fun. While in LA, we checked out concepts and visited restaurants, including Bottega Louie where I was drooling over their amazing pastries and cupcakes. Check out the Macaron Tree below! The weekend was full of glitterati sightings at the SLS hotel in Beverly Hills where party goers for JJ McKay’s (Seattle party host extraordinaire) party were staying. JJ’s parties always bring in the who’s who of crowds and lead to the best networking ever. Guests flew in from all over the US, including partiers from Miami and NY to Dallas, San Francisco and Seattle.

Macaron Tree
Bottega Louie’s Macaron Tree!

JJ, Joe
The always faboo JJ McKay, myself, and producer Joe Gressis from Secret Handshake

Next stops: I’m off to Vancouver, British Columbia this week for work with the Fairmont Hotels and then New Orleans, Louisiana and Washington, D.C. Stay tuned for more tasty travel round up’s on my blog.

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Serious Sippin’ with the Liquid Kitchen

Filming for the 3rd Season of Kathy Casey’s Liquid Kitchen™ just wrapped up with Small Screen Network. We filmed 18 episodes in two days! Vitamix was our main sponsor this season and so expect lots of amazing, blended summer drink episodes, like my Liquid Indulgence (vanilla ice cream, espresso and salted caramel incorporated together and topped with a float of mezcal!) and a Blended Peach Whisky Sour! A Seattle LUPEC member was the top bidder to be a guest on Liquid Kitchen at a recent breast cancer fundraising event. So in honor of the ladies who love to imbibe I created the Green Goddess for an episode – Green Chartreuse, egg whites, fresh pineapple, silver rum, a touch of lemon and Bitter Truth Celery Bitters – yum! Stay tuned for these new episodes to be posted soon!

Lynn Becker
Special Guest and LUPEC Seattle member Lynn Becker and I shaking up a Green Goddess Cocktail!

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Tasty & Libatious Reads – and Cooking up a New Cookbook

If you follow me on Twitter, then you may have caught wind that I just finished the recipes and am now shooting the photography for my 10th cookbook… all on deviled eggs! Stay updated with Twitter on my book’s progress as I tweet more behind the scenes of our photo shoots.

The new Food & Wine Cocktails 2012 book is out! This year I share my creative versions of the ever classic French 75. This cocktail book covers an extensive array of classic cocktails with featured mixologists’ personal variations. How about a Salted Maple (a Pisco Sour variation) or a Lord Bullingdon’s Revenge (a Sazerac spin)? There are also non-alcoholic options too! Make sure you get your copy today!

Food and Wine 2012

If you’re a frequent flyer, check out this special promo from Amazon.com. Free Wi-Fi access to Amazon.com on most Delta flights. Click here for more info. Faboo!

And don’t forget to check out Sip Northwest magazine for all you Pacific Northwest imbibers, including bars to sip, recipes to make, and new spirits to taste. Here’s a sneak peak on one of my articles. You can also pick up a complimentary copy at my Dish D’Lish cafés at the Seattle-Tacoma International Airport.

Sip NW Logo

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New Restaurant Fave!

New restaurants are popping up everywhere, but one of my new faves is Chef Greg Atknison’s Restaurant Marché located on Bainbridge Island, Washington. Greg is one of my all-time favorite chefs and I am so happy for him and his wife Betsy. The restaurant and menu totally embodies Greg’s signature style and flair. I enjoyed my recent birthday dinner there with the hubby and friends and was swooning by the time I left from total culinary bliss. If you have a trip planned to the Pacific Northwest or are a local be sure to make reservations and check it out. It’s a quick ferry ride across the Puget Sound and is close to the ferry terminal. Marché is open for lunch and dinner on Tuesdays – Saturdays. The menu changes with the seasons, featuring northwest cuisine and island goods (think amazing wild greens, crisp oysters, smooth-as-silk-chicken liver pate you want to rub on yourself!). Take a peek at this season’s menu items.

Restaurant Marche
Bainbridge Island’s newest hot spot!

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Where to Catch Kathy Next:

Tales of the Cocktail – July 25-29, 2012 – New Orleans, Louisiana

The Flavor Experience – August 6-8, 2012 – Newport Beach, California

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Cook Up Some Fun with Paramount Citrus!

Agua Fresca

Market Fresh Lime Agua Fresca
Makes 1 drink

1 1/2 oz fresh-squeezed Paramount Citrus lime juice
2 oz Zesty Lime Syrup (recipe follows)
3 oz chilled soda water
1 oz Market Fruit Berry Topping (recipe follows)
Garnish: long fresh lime zest twist or lime wedge

Fill a large tall glass with ice. Add the citrus juices and the Zesty Lime Syrup. Add soda water and stir. Top with Market Fruit Topping. Garnish with lime zest.

Zesty Lime Syrup
Makes 2 1/4 cups

3 Tbsp finely minced lime zest (with no white pith)
2 cups sugar
2 cups water

Combine the zest, sugar and water in a small saucepan. Bring to a quick boil over high heat. Boil for 1 minute then remove from heat and let cool. Store refrigerated for up to 3 weeks.

Market-Fruit Berry Topping
Makes 2 1/4 cups

1 cup fresh raspberries
1 cup small diced strawberries
1/4 cup raspberry puree

Mix ingredients together. Store refrigerated.

Recipe by Kathy Casey Liquid KitchenTM

I hope you enjoyed my quick recap of what’s been going on lately. Make sure you join me on the weekends at Dishing with Kathy Casey on KOMO News Radio and check my corresponding blog with all the corresponding recipes and tips. –Kathy

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Follow on Twitter @KathyCaseyChef. Blogging: Dishing with Kathy Casey. Like on Facebook: Sips & Apps and Kathy Casey’s Liquid Kitchen. Watch: www.LiquidKitchen.tv.

If you haven’t signed up for my Newsletter, you can sign up here.

Add comment June 6th, 2012

Cozy Up with Cocoas!

Sipping hot cocoa brings up cozy, winter memories for me: Now that’s a hot cocoa! (Photo by Kathy Casey Food Studios®)my mom mixing up Hershey’s cocoa powder with warm milk and a dash of cinnamon (or vanilla) in her old copper-bottomed Reverewear pan. Ooh and my favorite part! The big fluffy marshmallow floating on top… yum!

I still love making My Mom’s “Old School” Cocoa when it’s freezing out. Kids of all ages love it when they need something to warm up with or to relax to.

Cocoa is the perfect vehicle for flavor experimenting from fragrant spices like cinnamon and cloves to the totally unexpected profiles like Indian curry and cardamom.

For the recipes, continue reading on Amazon’s Al Dente Blog.

Add comment January 27th, 2012

Festive Non-Alcoholic Sipping

The holiday season goes hand-in-hand with some of our favorite libations. Rum and eggnog, mulled wine, holiday punch, champagne cocktails…but not everyone imbibes. Whether they are designated driver or just don’t drink, make sure everyone has something special to sip for the holiday season

One of my faves is the Rosemary Pom Holiday Sparkle. Made d’lish by shaking up fresh rosemary, Cutie’s sweet clementines and tart pomegranate juice. Top this with sparkling apple cider for a bit of bubbly. You can serve it on the rocks or strained into a champagne flute for a more elegant presentation. For parties, I like to float a cranberry and a little sprig of rosemary in the drink for a cheery garnish.

Homemade sodas are also a great party idea for kids of all sizes. Just combine syrup and soda or sparkling water over ice … it’s just that easy for a fun and refreshing twist on the traditional soda! Monin has an amazing line up of flavors available online, from spicy mango to blood orange as well as blueberry pie and toasted marshmallow.

Don’t forget to check your grocery stores for fun syrups! Local restaurant supply chain Cash and Carry has a huge inventory of goods so make sure to browse their syrups. You can also experiment in making your own syrups too – ginger jasmine lime is one of my favorites and tastes great in my Cucumber Ginger Jasmine Fizz.

Cucmber_75-web
My Cucumber Ginger Jasmine Fizz!

For the holidays, make sure your non-imbibing guests have just as much fun as everyone else with some creative sips – sans the alcohol.

Cheers! – Kathy

Rosemary Pom Holiday Sparkle
Fresh rosemary’s herbal essence complements the tangy flavor of the clementine and the sweetness of the sparkling cider. When making this in the Middle East, I substituted sparkling date cider instead of the apple cider! It was fantastic!

Makes 1 drink

1 sprig fresh rosemary
1/4 or 1/2 of a clementine or mandarin, depending on size
(I like to use Cuties Clementines as they have no seeds)
1 1/2 oz pomegranate juice
3 oz sparkling apple cider
Garnish: Fresh rosemary sprig

Bend 1 rosemary sprig and drop into a cocktail shaker. Squeeze in the clementine then drop in. Measure in the pomegranate juice. Fill the shaker with ice. Cap and shake vigorously. Pour into a tall glass. Top with the cider and stir. Garnish with a rosemary sprig. (Or, you can shake the drink in the cocktail shaker, then add the sparkling cider and strain the drink into a tall champagne flute for a more elegant look.)

Recipe © Kathy Casey Liquid Kitchen

Cucumber Ginger Jasmine Fizz
Makes 1 drink

3–4 slices fresh cucumber
1 1/2 oz Ginger Jasmine Lime Syrup (recipe follows)
3 oz sparkling water or club soda
Garnish: Candied ginger and cucumber slice on a pick, or a lime wedge

Drop the cucumber into a cocktail shaker and muddle well to release the juices. Measure in the Ginger Jasmine Lime Syrup. Fill shaker with ice. Cap and shake vigorously. Add sparkling water to shaker and then strain drink into a martini glass. Garnish as desired.

Ginger Jasmine Lime Syrup
Makes 12 oz or enough for about 8 drinks

1 tsp minced ginger
1 cup fresh lime juice
3/4 cup sugar
1/2 cup water
2 Tbsp loose jasmine tea

In a small heavy saucepan, combine the ginger, lime juice, sugar, and water. Bring to a boil over high heat and boil 1 minute. Remove from heat and stir in the tea. Steep for 5 minutes, then strain through a very fine strainer, pressing out as much liquid as possible. Discard the solids. Refrigerate the syrup, for up to 7 days, until ready to use.

Recipe © Kathy Casey Liquid Kitchen

Add comment December 23rd, 2011

Savory Slow Cooking

With autumn arriving and the weather turning cooler, it instinctively feels like the right time to dust off the crock pot and start enjoying some delicious, slow-cooked meals.

Slow cooking can be achieved a bunch of different ways: in a slow cooker or crock pot; low simmered on the stove top; or low and slow in the oven. One of the best things about slow cooker dishes is that they are the perfect way to utilize tougher cuts of meat, which are typically big-flavored, but easy on the wallet. Think juicy brisket, flavorful chili or a delicious curry.

With busy fall schedules, work, school activities, shorter days and holiday planning, a slow cooked meal popped in the crock pot before you head out for your day can be just what the chilly weather ordered. And crock pot cuisine has evolved – it’s not just a pork roast and a can of soup these days. Today, it’s Chili & Lime Slow Cooked Pork with Red Onion Escabeche and Warm Tortillas for an easy weeknight nosh. With a little planning, you can put the crock pot on in the morning and have dinner ready to go when you get home.

And the best part? Slow-cooked dishes are even better reheated because the ingredients have had extra time to get to know each other. Yummy leftovers are always welcome!

So turn on your crock pot and let dinner simmer away while you enjoy your autumn!
–Kathy

Chili & Lime Slow-Cooked Pork with Red Onion Escabeche and Warm Tortillas

Makes 6 hearty servings

Pork
1/4 cup chili powder
1 Tbsp coriander seed, crushed
1 Tbsp salt
1 boneless pork butt (shoulder), about 3 pounds, cut into 2 pieces
2 large tomatoes, chopped
4 cloves garlic, sliced
1/4 cup fresh lime juice

Escabeche
2 large carrots, julienned
1 large red onion, thinly sliced
1/2 cup fresh lime juice
2 Tbsps corn or other vegetable oil
1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh cilantro (about 1 bunch)
1 tsp salt

Accompaniments
Warm corn tortillas
Sour cream
Salsa or freshly made pico de gallo
Queso fresco (Mexican-style fresh cheese)
Fresh cilantro sprigs
Lime wedges

To prepare the pork, mix the chili powder, coriander seed and salt in a large, shallow bowl. Roll the pork in the mixture, taking up all the seasoning.

Put the pork in a slow-cooker, add the remaining ingredients and set the cooker on high. Let cook for 8 hours—or up to 10 hours if you’re still at work!

When ready to serve, mix the escabeche ingredients well then place in a serving dish. Shred the pork and place in a large serving bowl with some of the cooking liquid.

Serve the pork with the escabeche and accompaniments. Diners build their own “soft tacos,” then squeeze lime juice over the filling before folding.

Chef’s Note: To heat tortillas, place them, one by one, on a dry skillet over medium-high heat and turn frequently. As they are heated, slip them between the folds of a clean dish towel or cloth napkin. Wrap the towel in foil (or put into a small casserole dish and cover) to steam in their own heat and moisture. Or, microwave the tortillas very briefly and put into a napkin as above. Or, wrap several tortillas in a foil packet and steam them in a steamer until just heated through; use directly from the foil or wrap in a towel as described above.

Recipe from Kathy Casey’s Northwest Table, Chronicle Books, San Francisco. Copyright © 2006 by Kathy Casey.

Add comment November 10th, 2011

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