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Dip In To Yum!

Everyone has their go-to dips! Gooey, cheese fondue to classic sour cream and French onion to 7-layer Mexican—all perfect for almost any occasion from game day to patio parties.

But these days there are lots of creative, healthier spins to dips as well. We’re seeing less full-fat sour cream and more Greek yogurt and lighter mayos. Even this party staple can’t escape the better-for-you revolution!

Hummus is all the rage lately. Made with protein rich garbanzo beans, this is super, quick and easy to make from scratch, but is also available in a wide variety of flavors at your local grocery store. From roasted red pepper to sun-dried tomato, hummus is packing some serious flavor.

Creamy white bean dips are also popular and fall into the better-for-you category as well. We are even seeing “edamame hummus” popping at stores like Whole Foods!

It’s fun and tasty to layer dips too – like in my sophisticated Tuscan White Bean Dip Layered with Green Olive and Lemon Tapenade. Start with a creamy, rich white bean base and top with some bold flavored green olive and lemon tapenade – this flavor combo is sure to delight your next houseguests!

We all love to dip with potato and tortilla chips, but you can lighten up your dippables, too! Try something new like baked pita chips, rice crackers for gluten-free options, as well as fresh endive leaves, slices of crunchy fennel, colorful bell pepper pieces and French radishes. What a great way to add some color to your plate as well!

Get out of your dip rut, lighten up and try something new! –Kathy

Tuscan White Bean Dip Layered with Green Olive and Lemon Tapenade
I love to make the tapenade with those brilliant green Castelvetrano olives available at olive bars. If you want to take some extra time and pit them rather than buying pitted jarred olives, it is worth it! I like to serve this dip with pita chips or rustic crackers.

Makes 3 cups, or about 8 to 10 servings

Dip
1 (15-ounce) cans white beans, drained well
2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese (optional)
3 cloves fresh garlic, peeled
pinch of red pepper flakes
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1 teaspoon very finely minced lemon zest
1 teaspoon very finely minced fresh rosemary
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil

Tapenade
1 1/2 cups pitted manzanilla or other green olives, drained
1 tablespoon minced fresh garlic
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 tablespoon very finely minced lemon zest
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil or oil from sun-dried tomatoes
1/4 cup coarsely chopped Italian parsley
1/4 cup finely chopped sun-dried tomatoes in oil, drained

Garnish: extra-virgin olive oil and fresh rosemary sprig

To make the dip: In a food processor, combine the drained beans, cheese, if using, and garlic, and process for about 1 minute. Scrape down the sides of the bowl and add the pepper flakes, lemon juice and zest, rosemary and salt. With the motor running, add the oil through the feed tube in a slow stream. Process until smooth. Taste for salt and adjust if desired. Store the dip, covered and refrigerated, for up to 3 days.

To make the tapenade: In a food processor, combine the olives, garlic, lemon juice and zest, and oil, and pulse till the ingredients are thoroughly chopped, but still have some coarseness to them. Add the parsley and sundried tomatoes and pulse until just integrated. The tapenade can be stored, covered and refrigerated, for up to 1 week.

To serve: Put the dip in a pretty bowl, smooth out the surface, then layer the tapenade on top. Drizzle with a tiny bit of olive oil, and garnish with the rosemary.

Recipe by Kathy Casey Food Studios®

Posted by Kathy Casey on March 29th, 2013  |  Comments Off on Dip In To Yum! |  Posted in appetizers, Cocktails, KOMO Radio, Lifestyle, other, Recent Posts, Recipes, sides

For the Coffee Lovers

Ahh, coffee! That first cup o’ joe usually sets the tone for the rest of the day. And certainly the Pacific Northwest is known as the mecca for coffee drinkers and connoisseurs alike. Some think of us as coffee snobs…maybe some of us are!

After all, we do love our coffee, as much as we cherish our wines. Many independent coffee shops and cafes (frequented by the true coffee geeks) often hold coffee “cuppings” – picture a wine tasting, but for coffee!

Coffee beans
I love the scent of fresh roasted coffee beans!

(Photo courtesy of Fontee Coffee)

While dark chocolate and coffee are a match made in heaven, it pairs well with other flavors and other applications too. Add ground espresso to spice rubs for a flavor pop – excellent on steak or Alaskan salmon. Brewed coffee is great in baked beans, hearty stews and in d’lish in my Red Eye BBQ Sauce – try slathering over grilled chicken or ribs…yum!

On the sweeter side of things, try adding a little ground espresso to chocolate cupcake batter for a mocha-licious treat. For a zippy twist on zucchini cake, work in a little strong brewed coffee for a Northwest take on this perennial favorite.

So put a little pick-me-up into your next dish. -Kathy

Red Eye Barbecue Sauce
Makes 2 1/4 cups

1 tablespoon olive oil
1/3 cup 1/4-inch-chopped yellow onion
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1/8 teaspoon celery seed
1/4 teaspoon ground coriander
1/4 teaspoon ground cumin
3/4 teaspoon dry mustard
1 tablespoon minced garlic
1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
1/2 cup brewed coffee
5 tablespoons Worcestershire
3 tablespoons molasses
1/3 cup packed dark brown sugar
1 cup ketchup
3/4 teaspoon Tabasco
1 1/2 teaspoons soy sauce
1/8 teaspoon salt

Heat the oil in a heavy saucepan over medium-high heat. Add the onion and sprinkle the black pepper and other dry spices on top. Stir and sauté until the onions are glossy, about 3 minutes. Add the garlic and continue to sauté about 1 more minute.

When the onions are translucent, whisk in the remaining ingredients. Bring to a low boil, then reduce the heat and simmer 30 minutes, stirring frequently to prevent scorching. If not using the sauce right away, cool and store, refrigerated, for up to 10 days.
Recipe by Kathy Casey Food Studios®

Posted by Kathy Casey on February 28th, 2013  |  Comments Off on For the Coffee Lovers |  Posted in Foodie News, KOMO Radio, Lifestyle, other, Recent Posts, Recipes

Get Your Munch on with Pistachios

“Get Crackin’” has become a familiar tagline in TV commercials for the wonderful pistachio – but this little nut is more than just a pop culture phenomenon. Listed as a super food, nuts, and pistachios in particular, have a wide range of health benefits to top off their delicious flavor. From heart-healthy fats to high protein content, pistachios are the perfect snack or as a lovely accent to many d’lish dishes!

Sprinkle pistachios over Greek yogurt with dried cherries for a nutritious treat. Mix them in with dark chocolate, mini pretzels and dried cranberries for an indulgent trail mix. Or use them to finish off my Roasted Beets with Orange Honey Vinaigrette and Pistachios for tasty texture.

One of my favorite recipes featuring pistachios is my Warm Orange & Pistachio Bittersweet Chocolate Cake. Baked right in little mason jars and topped with a pouf of orange cream, these mini cakes are so cute and perfect for weekend entertaining!

So get crackin’ on some new ways to enjoy this healthful and flavorful nut! -Kathy

Roasted Beets with Orange Honey Vinaigrette and Pistachios
You can prepare this recipe part way in advance: After roasting beets, cover and refrigerate for up to 3 days. When ready to serve, drain beets again if necessary, and proceed with the recipe, sauteing beets in the syrupy vinaigrette until heated through.

Makes about 6 servings

6 large beets (about 3 pounds)
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
3 tablespoons orange juice concentrate, undiluted
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons honey
1 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon black pepper
1/2 cup shelled pistachios, chopped

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Peel beets and cut into 1-inch chunks. Toss beets with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil and place in a 9- x 13-inch baking pan, then cover pan with foil. Roast beets in preheated oven about 40 minutes, then remove foil and continue roasting about 15 – 20 minutes more until beets are tender. Remove beets from oven and drain off any excess liquid.

Meanwhile, in a saute pan, whisk together remaining olive oil, OJ concentrate, lemon juice, honey, salt and pepper, and place over medium-high heat. Cook for about 1 1/2 minutes, or until syrupy. Add beets and saute to coat evenly.

Sprinkle nuts on top to garnish. Serve hot or at room temperature.

Recipe by Kathy Casey Food Studios®

Warm Orange & Pistachio Bittersweet Chocolate Cakes “in a Jar” with Orange Cream
Photo by Kathy Casey Food Studios®

Warm Orange & Pistachio Bittersweet Chocolate Cakes “in a Jar” with Orange Cream
You can also make the cake batter up the day before, then just assemble in the jars, bake and serve warm! If baking ahead, you can chill down the baked cakes and just give a quick reheat in a hot oven or microwave to warm them.

Makes 6 cakes

Cakes
6 ounces bittersweet chocolate, chopped into small chunks
10 tablespoons (1 stick plus 2 tablespoons) butter
5 large eggs
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 tablespoon fine fresh orange zest
1 tablespoon flour
2 tablespoons orange juice concentrate
2 tablespoons Cointreau or Grand Mariner liqueur
1/2 cup shelled pistachios, lightly toasted and coarsely chopped

Orange Cream
1/3 cup heavy whipping cream
2 tablespoons powdered sugar
2 tablespoons sour cream
1 tablespoon orange juice concentrate

Garnish: fine fresh orange zest

To make the cake batter: In a double boiler or medium bowl set over a pan of simmering water, combine the chocolate and butter. Heat over medium heat, stirring often, until the butter and chocolate are just barely melted. Remove from the heat and stir until completely melted.

In another bowl, beat together the eggs, sugar, vanilla, zest, flour, orange juice concentrate and liqueur. Stir in the melted chocolate mixture and the pistachios. Refrigerate batter for 2 hours or up to overnight.

To bake the cakes: Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.

Stir the batter to distribute the nuts. Divide the batter evenly, scooping 1/2 cup batter into each of 6 half-pint, wide-mouth canning jars (or you can substitute glass custard cups). Place the jars on a baking sheet and bake for about 22 to 28 minutes, or until the cakes are set but the centers are still very, very soft. (See chef’s note.) Let cool for 3 to 4 minutes and serve warm.

To make the orange cream: While the cakes are cooking, whisk the cream and powdered sugar together in a medium bowl until lightly peaking. Add the sour cream and orange juice concentrate. Whisk in until nicely peaking.

Top each cake with a dollop of cream and sprinkle with orange zest.

Chef’s note: Ovens differ, so bake the cakes for about 22 minutes for very soft center or 24 to 28 minutes for somewhat firmer centers. When removed from the oven, the centers of the cakes should still be gooey. If using cold batter from the refrigerator the cakes will take longer to cook.

Recipe by Kathy Casey Food Studios®

Posted by Kathy Casey on February 1st, 2013  |  Comments Off on Get Your Munch on with Pistachios |  Posted in dessert, Foodie News, KOMO Radio, Lifestyle, other, Recent Posts, Recipes, sides, Snacks

Marvelous Maple Syrup

Maple Syrup! Doesn’t the mere mention of it just conjure up warm food memories? Griddled tall stacks of pancakes drizzled with sweet syrup. Hot, crispy strips of maple-cured bacon… Yum!

But it’s not just for breakfast foods! Maple’s unique flavor is great in all kinds of recipes and different grades of syrup are preferred for different uses. Dark to medium amber grades are perfect for use in cooking and baking; their stronger flavor holds up great. Light and “Fancy” grades are best used where the syrup’s subtle flavor can be appreciated, such as drizzled over yogurt.

MapleSyrupGrades
The Different Maple Syrup Grades
(Photo courtesy of TheNibble.com)

On the savory side of things, maple syrup is perfect in a marinade for pork; added to a pot of baked beans; or even in a dressing, such as in my recipe for Maple Vinaigrette. It is great tossed with your favorite greens, fresh sliced pears and toasted pecans. It works wonderfully on chicken breasts, too!

For those with a sweet tooth, try my Maple Panna Cotta—a no-bake custard-style dessert! It is simple to make and truly is delectable; and pretty with a pouf of whipped cream and garnished with a maple sugar candy leaf!

So make a resolution to branch out and try this sweet syrup “in” instead of “on” something different this year! -Kathy

Maple Vinaigrette
Makes about 1 cup

6 tablespoons real maple syrup, preferably grade B
3 tablespoons cider vinegar
1 1/2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
1 tablespoon finely minced shallots
1/4 cup olive oil
1/4 cup vegetable oil
1/2 teaspoon salt
pinch of cayenne pepper

In a medium bowl, whisk together the maple syrup, vinegar, mustard and shallots. Combine the two oils and then, while whisking continuously, drizzle the oil into the syrup mixture. The dressing should be well mixed and emulsified. Whisk in the seasonings.
Store covered in the refrigerator for up to 3 weeks. Rewhisk before using.

Recipe by Kathy Casey Food Studios®

Maple Panna Cotta
Makes 6 servings

2 teaspoons unflavored gelatin (this will be less than 1 envelope)
2 tablespoons warm water
1 cup heavy whipping cream
1 cup mascarpone
1 cup real maple syrup, preferably grade B

For garnishing: lightly sweetened whipped cream and maple sugar candy leaves if desired

To make the panna cotta, sprinkle the gelatin over the water in a large heatproof bowl. Let sit for 10 minutes.

Whisk in the cream, mascarpone, and maple syrup and set the bowl over a pan of simmering water. Whisk the mixture until smooth and warmed.

Divide the mixture evenly among 6 martini glasses. Cover each one with plastic wrap. Be sure that the wrap does not touch the tops of the panna cotta. Refrigerate overnight, or for a minimum of 12 hours, before serving.

Top with a tiny pouf of whipped cream and a maple candy if desired.

Recipe by Kathy Casey Food Studios®

Posted by Kathy Casey on January 11th, 2013  |  Comments Off on Marvelous Maple Syrup |  Posted in dessert, Foodie News, KOMO Radio, Lifestyle, other, Recent Posts, Recipes, salads

Zingy Bloody Mary’s

Whether it’s a Sunday brunch spent with family and friends or on game day, anytime is perfect for a Bloody Mary!

There are definitely two schools of thought when it comes to this savory cocktail. Some people like to stick to tradition (“If it isn’t broken, then don’t fix it.”) while others love to step outside of the box and mix-it-up with their Mary’s. I personally think there’s always room for both!

Spice up your Mary experience with some new flavors and combinations!  Try adding in some zingy flavors like wasabi or Sriracha. Change up the spirit to tequila, gin or aquavit for a new taste twist.
Take my Bloody Good Vodka: Infuse vodka at home with sun-dried tomatoes, basil and garlic then let it sit for 2 days before stirring with my Balsamic Mary Mix (made with fresh tomato, cucumber and peppers and the flavor pow of horseradish)!


My Bloody Good Balsamic Mary!
For the recipe, check out www.LiquidKitchen.tv

And don’t forget to get creative with the garnishes! For an easy entertaining set-up, a Bloody Mary DIY garnish bar for your guests is a great way to get the party started. Put out some picks and an assortment of lemon wedges, stuffed olives, crispy bacon, celery, pickled veggies, cherry tomatoes, chunks of salami, cheese and pickled onions – now that could almost be brunch itself!

Cheers to the Bloody Mary! –Kathy

Posted by Kathy Casey on December 27th, 2012  |  Comments Off on Zingy Bloody Mary’s |  Posted in Cocktails, Foodie News, KOMO Radio, Lifestyle, other, Recent Posts, Recipes, Small Screen Network, videos

Kroger Family of Stores + MyMagazine Extras

Kroger Family of Stores has just made holiday entertaining that much more easier with their MyMagazine Extras Holiday 2012 edition! This go-to  guide features a plethora of ideas from gifting gift cards, homemade treats, some of my cocktail recipes for your next festive cocktail party, and so much more.

MyMagazine Extras is free to download and available for iPad, Android and Kindle tablets! You can also view their online edition here!

Here’s a sneak peak:

Holiday Manhattan with Spiked Cherries

Here’s to a Happy Holidays! -Kathy

Print
Kroger_familyofstores_logo

Posted by Kathy Casey on November 30th, 2012  |  Comments Off on Kroger Family of Stores + MyMagazine Extras |  Posted in Cocktails, dessert, Foodie News, Fruit, Lifestyle, other, Recent Posts, Recipes, Snacks

Delicious Seasonal Squash

I love winter squash! I love its texture, sweetness, and most of all its versatility. It’s great in soups, stuffed in ravioli or made into a tart! You don’t just have to roast it in the oven with brown sugar – although how d’lish does that sound?

And it’s not just all about the beloved butternut or Danish squash, either. There are tons of different varieties of squash to choose from: gold nugget, turbans, Hubbards and sweet dumplings… and each one varies in colors, flavors, and textures.

Delicious Squash
These are beautiful squash that was at the Farmers Market on Magnolia

Take for example spaghetti squash.  Its name comes from their near spaghetti-like flesh! Just cut it in half place cut side on a baking dish with a little water and bake till tender. Once cooked, fork out its spaghetti-like flesh then serve it up with a delicious red sauce. Presto! You’ve got a tasty gluten-free veggie dinnertime hit!

Jack Be Little squash, the tiniest member of the squash line up, are excellent roasted whole (seeds scooped out first) then rubbed with olive oil and seasonings and baked till tender. With these little guys you can even eat the tender skin. I like to roast them and then serve filled with other fall veggies such as sautéed brussel sprouts with bacon and a little maple syrup. Yum!

One of my favorite squash creations for fall entertaining is Spiced Butternut Squash Hummus. Now that’s a fun new idea. Serve with pita chips, crostini or fresh veggies for dipping. It is also a great spread for a turkey sandwich!

I’ll leave you with one more tip. If you happen upon a giant squash and have no idea how to get into it, place it in a garbage bag and then sling it the ground as hard as you can–voila your squash is cracked open now!  -Kathy

Spiced Butternut Squash Hummus
Makes about 3 1/2 – 4 cups

1 small butternut squash, about 2 1/2 pounds
3/4 cup drained cooked or canned garbanzo beans
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 teaspoons minced fresh garlic
3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1/4 cup tahini (sesame paste)
1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
2 tablespoons chopped cilantro (optional)
Garnishes: olive oil for drizzling, chopped parsley or cilantro, and pomegranate seeds

Preheat an oven to 325 degrees F.

Cut squash in half and remove seeds. Cut squash into 8 wedges. Brush with olive oil and roast on a pan-sprayed baking sheet, uncovered, for 1 1/2 hours or until very tender. The squash should brown a little. Let cool. Scrape out the cooked squash meat with a large metal spoon; discard the skins. You should have about 3 cups cooked squash meat. (You can prepare up to this point 2 days in advance and keep refrigerated.)

In a food processor, process the garbanzo beans until coarsely chopped (about 1 minute). Then add the roasted squash and remaining ingredients, and process until smooth.

Serve drizzled with olive oil, sprinkled with parsley and garnished with fresh pomegranate seeds if desired.

Recipe by Kathy Casey Food Studios®

Posted by Kathy Casey on November 1st, 2012  |  Comments (1) |  Posted in appetizers, KOMO Radio, other, Recent Posts, Recipes, sides

Chasing Wild Mushrooms: Remembering Patrice benson

Why do I wish for rain every fall? Because as soon as it begins, our Northwest grounds moisten and the magic begins. Local wild mushrooms start to pop up! Chanterelles, the fragrant matsutake, cauliflower mushroom (its genus name is Sparassis but it does look like a big cauliflower), angel wings, hedgehog, oyster … the Pacific Northwest has a bounty of edibles yours for the finding. Wild mushroom foraging is one of my favorite activities during the fall season.

Matsutake
Tasty matsutake mushrooms – nom nom nom!

I have been a huge foraging enthusiast for years. It’s how I met fellow mycophagist (mushroom eater/lover) Patrice Benson, who let me tag along through the years to her secret mushroom-picking spots. Of course, I never know exactly where we are going because, like any good mushroom hunter, Patrice would never tell me exactly where we were.  Lucky for her, I’m so directionally challenged that I wouldn’t be able to find my way back if I tried!

For over 20 years, Patrice shared her amazing mushroom knowledge with local enthusiasts and chefs, teaching everyone the ins and outs of seeking wild mushrooms. Patrice passed on recently but I know she will be with us in spirit this year as we seek out the first of the season’s mushrooms.

Patrice Benson
Dear friend Patrice Benson with a bounty of mushrooms! Look at all those Chanterelles!
Thank you, Patrice, for sharing your wonderful knowledge with me and so many others.

If you’re curious about foraging but have never been before, I highly recommend checking out the Puget Sound Mycological Society.  They have scores of info for wild mushroom lovers of all backgrounds. From budding beginners to seasoned professionals, the PSMS has all sorts of activities and programs to keep you hunting!

Speaking of activities, this weekend is the annual Puget Sound Wild Mushroom Show held at the Mountaineers Club (located in Seattle’s Magnusson Park), where there will be hundreds of species exhibited. The PSMS has put on a wild mushroom festival every year since 1964. Their two-day fair is one of the largest in North America.

There’ll be guest speakers, program/membership info, an art contest and of course cooking demos! I’ll be cooking up some wild mushroom fun on Sunday (Oct.14) from 2-4 pm — and sharing my “When I Found the Mother Load” story. General Admission is $10 and fun for all ages!

Don’t fret if you can’t make out to the show! There is another great opportunity for wild mushroom foragers – the 27th Annual Breitenbush Mushroom Gathering! Held at the Breitenbush Hot Springs on October 18th – 21st, attendees will focus on the diversity of the wild mushrooms in the Pacific Northwest and the many functions that mushrooms have for both humans and the natural world.

Whether it’s in the woods or from your favorite farmers market, use up this season’s chanterelles in my Savory Chanterelle Bread Pudding one of my favorite wild mushroom recipes.

If you do get a chance to go mushroom hunting, pack up some extra ingredients (as well as rustic breads and a bottle of wine!), a cast iron skillet, a few other staple ingredients and a portable burner – then try making my Wild Mushroom Ragout after pulling in your day’s bounty of mushrooms. So yummy slathered over thick slices of rustic bread and a glass of vino after an exhilarating day roaming the woods for the big find.

So to all you mycophagists out there, here’s to a fun and fruitful season of wild mushroom foraging! -Kathy

Savory Chanterelle Bread Pudding
It is important to use a rustic-style bread for this recipe—not airy bread.

Mushroom Bread Pudding
(Photo from Kathy Casey’s Northwest Table, Chronicle Books)

Makes 6 to 8 servings

1 Tbsp olive oil or butter
2 cups cleaned and sliced chanterelles (about 10 ounces)
1/2 cup diced onion
1/3 cup diced celery
1 Tbsp minced fresh garlic
4 cups 1-inch-cubed firm, rustic French- or Italian-style bread
1 1/2 Tbsps minced fresh sage
1 Tbsp minced fresh thyme or lemon thyme
1 1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp black pepper
1 1/2 cups half-and-half
1 1/2 cups milk
2 eggs
2 egg yolks

Preheat an oven to 325°F. Heat the oil in a large sauté pan or skillet over medium-high heat. Sauté the chanterelles and onion for 3 to 4 minutes, or until three-quarters done. Add the celery and sauté for about 1 1/2 to 2 minutes more. Add the garlic and sauté for 30 seconds more, taking care not to burn the garlic. Remove from the heat.

Combine the bread cubes, herbs, salt, and pepper in a large bowl. Mix in the cooked mushroom mixture and set aside.

Butter a 6-cup glass or ceramic baking dish or spray with vegetable-oil cooking spray.

Whisk the half-and-half, milk, eggs, and egg yolks in a medium bowl. Pour the egg mixture into the bread mixture and mix gently and thoroughly. Transfer the mixture to the baking dish and level out the surface, lightly pressing the bread down into the dish.

Bake for 50 to 60 minutes, or until the custard is just set in the center. Do not overbake or the custard will scramble.

Recipe from Kathy Casey’s Northwest Table, Chronicle Books

Wild Mushroom Ragout
My Wild Mushroom Ragout – that’s a 12-inch cast iron skillet…making that Boletus huge!
This is from my first book Pacific Northwest the Beautiful in 1993. Patrice picked these mushrooms for the photo shoot!

Wild Mushroom Ragout
From my first cook book – this recipe is still one of my favorites to enjoy after a long day of foraging. For a very rich flavor soak a few dried wild mushrooms such as Morels or Boletous (Cepes) in the brandy or sherry, then add to simmering ragout. Serve ragout in a big cast iron skillet and spread it on toasted rustic bread, or serve it over grilled fish or roasted chicken or pork.

For making out on your foraging trip take some butter or olive oil, some fresh herbs, onion, garlic, a half pint of heavy cream and a little jar of sherry brandy and white wine mixed together, a lemon and some seasoning — delete the stock. Pack a portable burner, cast iron skillet, a spoon, small cutting board, knife and a loaf of rustic bread. And wish for lot’s of mushrooms.

Makes about 6 servings

4 Tbsps butter
1 cup thinly sliced white onion
2 pounds mushrooms, quartered or sliced (a mixture of local fresh wild mushrooms, if available)
1 Tbsp fresh garlic, minced
2 tsp fresh thyme
1 1/2 tsp minced fresh rosemary or fresh mixed herbs such as thyme, chives and basil
1/4 cup chicken, or mushroom stock, (more or less as needed)
3 Tbsps sherry
2 Tbsps brandy (optional)
1 cup heavy cream
2-3 tsp lemon juice
1/2 tsp salt
1/8 tsp fresh ground black pepper
2 Tbsps chopped fresh parsley (optional)

In a large heavy bottomed skillet or small brazing pan. Melt butter over moderately high heat, add onions, mushrooms and garlic. Cook mixture, stirring often till mushrooms and onions are softened about 3-4 minutes. Add herbs, stock, sherry and brandy. Reduce till only a little liquid remains about 5 minutes or more depending upon if your mushrooms have a lot of moisture in them.

Add whipping cream and cook till mixture is a nice lightly thickened about 3-5 minutes. Add lemon juice. Cook for a couple more minutes. Season and stir in parsley.

Recipe © Kathy Casey Food Studios

Posted by Kathy Casey on October 13th, 2012  |  Comments Off on Chasing Wild Mushrooms: Remembering Patrice benson |  Posted in Conferences, Foodie News, KOMO Radio, Lifestyle, other, Recipes, sides
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