Oatmeal Any Time of Day

Oatmeal. We know that it makes for a hearty breakfast. The reason is that it contains soluble fiber (that stays in the stomach) helping you feel fuller, longer. This can keep you from overeating!

Eating just a half cup of oatmeal a day is enough to reap its many health benefits, such as supporting weight loss and boosting heart health to name a few.

There are a lot of varieties of oatmeal on the shelves today. Let me break it down for you. Steel-cut oats are the whole oat grain and bran, and are chopped with steel blades. Rolled oats are de-hulled then steamed and flattened between two rollers. Instant oats are steamed longer and completely cooked before dried. The less processed the oats are, the more fiber they will contain, and the more health benefits can be gained from eating them.

On the weekend, I like to cook a big batch of steel cut oats, let them cool, then layer it in 1/2 pint jars with dried fruits, nuts and seeds. Screw on the jar lids and refrigerate for the week. In the morning just remove the lid and then heat with a little fat free coconut milk in the microwave for a quick and healthy breakfast on the go!

Citrus Upside Down Cake 2
Who’s ready for a slice of Sunkist Orange Upside-Down Oat Cake?

And don’t forget about baking with oatmeal! My favorite is Orange Upside-Down Oat Cake! Great for a special brunch topped with a dollop of Greek yogurt. D’lish! –Kathy

Orange Upside-Down Oat Cake
Great for a hearty dessert or even as a breakfast cake, served with a dollop of Greek yogurt. Read all the way through recipe before starting. It is important to use a nonstick pan and to turn the cake out of the pan 5 minutes after removing from the oven.

Makes 1 (9-inch) round cake, serving 8 to 10

2/3 cup rolled oats (not instant)
1/2 cup golden raisins
3/4 tsp. ground cinnamon
1/4 tsp. ground nutmeg
1 Tbsp. Sunkist Orange zest
3/4 cup boiling water

Orange Layer
3 Tbsp. butter
3 Tbsp. brown sugar
1 large Sunkist Navel Orange, peel on, ends cut off and sliced into 8 to 10 thin slices

2/3 cup, packed, brown sugar
2/3 cup granulated sugar
1 large egg
1/3 cup vegetable oil
1 cup all-purpose flour
3/4 tsp. baking soda
1/4 tsp. salt
1/2 cup chopped pecans

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Mix oats, raisins, cinnamon, nutmeg and orange zest in a heat-proof container, and pour measured boiling water over mixture. Let sit for 15 minutes.

Meanwhile, prepare the pan and orange layer: put the butter in a 9-inch nonstick round cake pan and place in the oven until the butter is just melted, about 1 to 2 minutes. Sprinkle with the 3 tablespoons of brown sugar, and then lay out the orange slices in a pretty pattern.

To make the batter: In a mixer (or large bowl), combine the 2/3 cup brown sugar, granulated sugar, egg and oil, and mix well. In a small bowl, mix together the flour, soda and salt, and then add this mixture to the sugar mixture. Add plumped oat mixture and pecans, and mix until well combined.

Without disturbing the orange layer, add batter into the cake pan carefully, and then lightly rap pan on counter to release any bubbles. Bake in preheated oven for about 45 to 55 minutes, or until cake is golden and tests done.

Let sit for 5 minutes after removing from oven. Loosen sides of cake from pan with a table knife, and then immediately invert cake onto a large plate. Let cool before serving.

Chef Notes:

  • Try adding 1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom to the oat mixture for a different spice-flavor profile.
  • Great to serve for brunch; this cake is very moist, so you can make it a couple of days ahead.
  • Photo and Recipe by Kathy Casey Food Studios® for Sunkist®.

    Posted by Kathy on November 6th, 2015  |  Add Comment |  Posted in breakfast, dessert, Fruit, Recent Posts, Recipes


    A true sign of fall: apples appear everywhere. From thick caramel-coated and dipped in nuts to sweet and tangy cups of fresh-pressed cider at the local market to grand glass bowls filled with elegant red apples simply used as a table centerpiece.

    The Northwest has always been the hub for amazing apples. Glorious Galas with their perfume-y sweet flavor, firm Fujis that hold their texture amazingly well when cooked, deep-blushed Braeburns, and the list goes on.

    What most of us (at least us pie-lovers) think about when thinking of apples is pie, I love to make my apple pie with a little cheddar in the crust – yum!

    Spinach & Apple Salad with Warm Meyer Lemon-Bacon Vinaigrette
    Photo by Kathy Casey Food Studios for Sunkist

    But in addition to desserts there are bushels of other great ways to cook with apples. Try whipping up a Spinach & Apple Salad with Warm Meyer Lemon-Bacon Vinaigrette. It’s really quick and delicious.

    Looking for a new side dish? How about a toothsome Apple Barley Risotto – a twist on the classic using pearl barley instead of Arborio rice?

    Just remember, one of the best apple tips to observe is to always keep your apples refrigerated. At 70 degrees, apples break down and become soft 10 times faster than if refrigerated. Many a Northwesterner accomplished this in the olden days by stashing the winter’s apples under the bed, back when winter bedrooms were quite chilly. I bet those rooms smelled appley great!

    Cheers crisp fall apples – crunch! -Kathy

    Spinach & Apple Salad with Warm Meyer Lemon–Bacon Vinaigrette
    This salad is delicious as a starter, or serve it as an entrée topped with grilled chicken breast and crumbled blue cheese.

    Makes 6 servings as a starter salad

    6 cups baby spinach
    1 apple, cored and cut into thin slices
    1/2 cup thinly sliced white onion

    1/3 cup fresh-squeezed Sunkist Meyer Lemon juice
    2 tsp. Dijon mustard
    2 Tbsp. sugar
    1/2 tsp. coarsely ground black pepper
    1/4 tsp. salt
    2 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
    1/4 cup finely diced raw bacon
    2 tsp. minced fresh garlic

    Place spinach, apple and onion in a large, heat-proof bowl and refrigerate until ready to dress salad.

    In a small bowl, whisk together the lemon juice, mustard, sugar, pepper, salt
    and olive oil. Set vinaigrette aside.

    In a small nonstick pan, cook the bacon over medium-high heat until three-quarters done, about 2 to 3 minutes. Add garlic and stir for about 30 seconds, but do not brown garlic. Add the reserved vinaigrette to the hot pan. Immediately remove from heat and pour over reserved spinach mixture.

    Toss until salad is well coated with dressing, and serve immediately.

    Recipe created by Kathy Casey for Sunkist®

    Apple Barley Risotto
    Allow about 50 – 60 minutes total cooking time for this recipe.
    Makes 4 servings

    2 Tbsp. butter
    1 cup chopped mushrooms
    1/4 cup finely diced red onion
    1 1/2 tsp. minced garlic
    1/2 cup dry white wine
    1 Braeburn or Fuji apple, unpeeled, cored and diced 1/4-inch
    1/2 cup pearl barley
    2 1/2 cups chicken or vegetable broth
    1 cup water
    1/4 cup shredded, high-quality Parmesan cheese
    1/4 cup coarsely chopped hazelnuts, lightly toasted
    1/8 tsp. black pepper
    salt to taste (If using canned broth, less salt will be needed.)

    In a large heavy-bottom saucepan melt the butter over medium-high heat. Add the mushrooms and red onions. Sauté till mushrooms are limp. Add the garlic and stir around for about half a minute. Then immediately add the wine, increase heat to high and reduce wine till syrupy, about 3 minutes.

    Reduce heat to medium and stir in the diced apple and barley. In a bowl or large measuring cup mix together the broth and water. Add 1 cup to the barley and simmer till almost all the liquid is absorbed about 6 – 8 minutes.

    Stir in another cup of the broth-water mixture and continue cooking, stirring often, until all the liquid is absorbed. Repeat this process again until all the liquid has been used and the barley is tender.

    Remove from heat and fold in cheese, nuts and pepper. Taste and season with additional salt if needed.

    Recipe © Kathy Casey Food Studios® –

    Posted by Kathy on October 8th, 2015  |  Add Comment |  Posted in Fruit, KOMO Radio, Recipes, salads

    Bananas for Bananas

    Bananas, the ultimate naturally portable snack! Perfect for throwing into your purse or bag.

    Besides being deliciously handy, bananas are a great source of potassium while being low in sodium. They are a good source of Vitamin B6 as well as Vitamin C and dietary fiber, and are naturally fat free!

    If you’re thinking of a late-season campfire, then consider this s’more alternative:

    Take an unpeeled banana and make a split lengthwise – just not all the way through. Carve a trough from end to end, keeping the peel. Munch on the removed banana to tide you over, while filling the trough with bits of marshmallow and chocolate and sprinkle with crumbled graham crackers. Wrap the whole thing in tin foil and stick it in the embers like a potato, or over a hot grill. After a little while, take it out and carefully unwrap. Yum!

    s'more banana
    Fun Photo from Tablespoon.

    And bananas are quite delicious with savory things as well. My recipe for Banana Pineapple Chutney is flavored up with warm spices such as ginger and allspice. It’s a fantastic way to zip up a grilled chicken breast, or even better with a pork chop.

    Any way you slice them (or even if you don’t), bananas are d’lish! –Kathy

    Banana Pineapple Chutney
    Great served with basmati rice and vegetable curries as well as grilled scallops, chicken, pork chops or ham.

    Makes 3 cups

    1/3 cup 1/4-inch-diced red onion
    1/2 cup 1/4-inch-diced red bell pepper
    2 Tbsp. minced fresh ginger
    1/3 cup packed light brown sugar
    2 Tbsp. granulated sugar
    1/8 tsp. ground allspice
    1/4 tsp. ground cloves
    3/4 tsp. salt
    3/4 cup white wine vinegar
    2 Tbsp. water
    2 Tbsp. currants
    1 1/2 cups peeled and diced ripe fresh pineapple
    2 cups (about 2 large) firm underripe bananas, peeled, cut in half lengthwise then in 1/2-inch chunks

    In a heavy, wide, shallow, nonreactive pot, place all ingredients except the fruit. Bring to a boil over high heat and boil for about 4 minutes until mixture is syrupy and slightly reduced.

    Add currants and pineapple, reduce heat to medium and cook for about 1 minute. Gently fold in bananas and cook until just thickened, about 2 minutes more. Occasionally stir the mixture gently; do not stir roughly—you want to keep the fruit pieces’ integrity. Chutney should be thickened but still slightly juicy. If too dry, add 1 to 2 tablespoons of water.

    Remove from the heat and let cool. Refrigerate if not serving right away. Chutney should be slightly warm for serving.

    Recipe by © Kathy Casey Food Studios® –

    Posted by Kathy on September 24th, 2015  |  Add Comment |  Posted in Fruit, KOMO Radio, Recent Posts, Recipes

    Fig-a-licious Fruit!

    Although I love them, figs are so much more than the iconic Fig Newton, which by the way was first sold dried in a commercially manufactured cookie in 1892. Who knew?

    Figs: they’re unusual, versatile, and even grow well here in Seattle. I have a fig tree in my backyard!

    Fig edited
    A plump fig growing in my back Urban Garden – ready to be picked!

    It’s best to pick figs when fully ripened. The fig is ready for harvest when it drops on the stem from its own weight. Pick with the stems attached, but always plan to use within a few days.

    Although in the kitchen we consider it a fruit, the fig is actually a flower that is inverted into itself. There are no blossoms on the tree’s branches; the blossom is inside the fig. Many tiny flowers produce the crunchy little seeds that give figs their unusual taste and texture.

    Figs are of course fabulous fresh, but you can also cook up some creative dishes with them too.

    One of my favorite apps is quick and easy: Roasted Figs with Gorgonzola and Walnuts. So easy to make. I love them paired with a delicious Manhattan made with House Spiced Vermouth – YUM!–Kathy

    Roasted Figs with Gorgonzola and Walnuts
    Makes about 24 to 30 pieces

    4 ounces Gorgonzola cheese
    1/4 cup chopped walnuts
    1 pint fresh figs, halved lengthwise

    Preheat an oven to 425°F. In a small bowl, mix the Gorgonzola and walnuts. Arrange the figs, cut side up, on an ungreased baking sheet, and top each piece with 1 generous teaspoon of the Gorgonzola mixture.

    Roast the figs for about 6 to 8 minutes, or until heated through and the cheese is hot. Let cool slightly and enjoy!

    Recipe © from Kathy Casey’s Northwest Table Cookbook.

    Posted by Kathy on September 18th, 2015  |  Add Comment |  Posted in Books to Cook, Fruit, KOMO Radio, Recipes, Small Screen Network, videos

    Delicious and Versatile Northwest Pears

    We are so lucky here in the Northwest to have SO MANY delicious varieties of sumptuous pears! Bartlett, Bosc, Seckel, Concorde … each one different and oh so delicious!

    My fave pear preparation? I like to cut them into thick wedges and toss with a little olive oil, balsamic, and seasoning, then roast on a sheet pan in a HOT oven until they are tender. Great tossed in a salad, served with roast chicken or in my Roasted Pear Crostini with Gorgonzola appetizer!

    Pears make for some quick and easy sauces too – try sautéing iced pears till tender, puree then mix with a little wasabi for a tasty sauce for grilled fish. Or make a quick fresh relish with diced fresh pears, shallot, a touch of honey and a splash of red wine vinegar, toss it with fresh mint and you have an amazing accompaniment to lamb!

    Fresh Northwest pears are also great to include in your favorite smoothie recipe for natural added sweetness and in entrees like one of my favorite easy entertaining recipes – Spiced Baked Chicken with Pears and Port – yum! –Kathy

    Photo from Kathy Casey’s Sips & Apps, Chronicle Books – Angie Norwood Browne

    Roasted Pear Crostini with Gorgonzola
    These are extra-delicious topped with chopped toasted nuts, such as hazelnuts or walnuts. Balsamic glaze can be purchased at gourmet and well-stocked grocery stores.

    Makes 24

    2 firm NW red Bartlett or other red-skinned pears
    1 Tbsp. olive oil
    1 Tbsp. balsamic vinegar
    1/4 tsp. kosher salt
    1 tsp. minced fresh thyme

    24 pieces Herbed Crostini (recipe follows)
    1 cup (4 ounces) crumbled gorgonzola cheese or thinly sliced Cambozola
    2 Tbsp. balsamic glaze

    For garnishing
    Tiny sprigs of fresh thyme

    Preheat an oven to 450 degrees F.

    To roast the pears: Quarter the pears lengthwise, then core. Cut each quarter lengthwise into 6 slices (you should have 24 slices, total). In a medium bowl, whisk together the oil, vinegar, salt, and thyme. Add the pears and toss to coat.

    Spray a rimmed baking sheet with cooking spray. Lay out the pears, not touching, on the baking sheet. Roast for 12 to 15 minutes, or until golden and starting to caramelize on the edges. Pears can be cooled, covered, and refrigerated for up to 3 days before serving.

    When ready to serve, lay out the crostini on a baking sheet and top each piece with about 1 heaping teaspoon of gorgonzola or a slice of Cambozola,then a slice of pear. Bake until just warmed, about 4 minutes.

    Drizzle each piece with about 1/4 teaspoon balsamic glaze, then garnish with thyme.

    Herbed Crostini
    Crostini are the must-have party basic. Use as a base for assorted toppers, such as creamy cheeses, tapenade, or spreads.

    Makes 32 to 40 pieces

    1/3 cup olive oil
    1/2 tsp. dried basil leaves
    1/2 tsp. dried thyme leaves
    Pinch of cayenne pepper
    1 tsp. minced fresh garlic
    1 long, skinny French baguette, cut into 1/4-inch diagonal slices
    Kosher salt for sprinkling

    Preheat an oven to 400 degrees F.

    In a small bowl, mix the oil, dried herbs, cayenne, and garlic. Lightly brush the baguette slices with the herb oil or, in a large bowl, drizzle the bread with the oil and toss well. Lay out the bread in a single layer on baking sheets, sprinkle with salt, and bake for about 8 to 10 minutes, until just crispy.

    Crostini can be made in advance, cooled thoroughly, and stored in airtight containers for up to 3 days. If necessary, recrisp them in a hot oven for a couple of minutes.

    Recipe from Kathy Casey Sips & Apps, Chronicle Books –

    Spiced Chicken with Pears and Port
    This is a great entrée for a dinner party. I also love it sprinkled with blue cheese right before serving for a delicious twist.

    Makes 6 servings

    3 firm ripe fresh NW pears
    2 tsp. ground coriander
    1 tsp. ground cardamom
    1/2 tsp. black pepper
    1/4 tsp. cayenne pepper
    1 Tbsp. kosher salt
    3 Tbsp. olive oil
    6 skin-on, bone-in chicken breast halves
    2 shallots, thinly sliced
    6 cloves fresh garlic, sliced
    1 unpeeled lemon, sliced (about 9 slices)
    1 cup port wine
    1 tsp. cornstarch (optional)
    1/4 cup fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves for garnishing

    Preheat an oven to 375 degrees F.

    Cut pears in half and core. Cut each half in half and then in half again—to make large chunks. Reserve.

    In a small bowl, mix the spices and salt. Lay the chicken on a baking sheet or piece of waxed paper or plastic wrap, and sprinkle each piece liberally on both sides with the spice mixture.

    In a large nonstick skillet or sauté pan, heat the oil over medium-high heat until hot. Sauté half of the chicken for about 3 minutes on each side, or until the skin is deep golden brown and crispy. As the pieces are browned, place them, skin side up, in a 10-by-15-inch baking pan or small roasting pan. Repeat with the remaining chicken.

    Pour off any excess oil, then sauté the pears, shallots, garlic, and lemon for about 1 minute. Add the port and stir to scrape up the browned bits on the bottom of the pan. Bring just to a boil, and then add the hot mixture, with all the goodies, to the roasting pan, pouring it around, not over, the chicken to keep the browned crust intact.

    Roast for about 40 to 45 minutes, or until the chicken is opaque throughout and nicely browned on the outside, with an internal temperature of 160 degrees F (chicken will gain another 5 degrees on standing).

    Transfer the chicken to a platter or individual plates and keep warm. Using a slotted spoon, retrieve the pears, shallots, garlic, and lemon slices from the sauce and distribute them over the chicken. Place the roasting pan on a burner on high heat and cook to reduce the sauce to about 3/4 cup. (If you like your sauce to have a bit more body, mix 1 teaspoon of cornstarch with 2 teaspoons of water until smooth and whisk into the reducing sauce. Cook till lightly thickened.) Taste the sauce for seasoning, adjust if needed, then drizzle the sauce over the chicken and goodies. Scatter with parsley leaves for garnish.

    Adapted from Kathy Casey’s Northwest Table cookbook, Chronicle Books –

    Posted by Kathy on August 20th, 2015  |  Add Comment |  Posted in appetizers, Fruit, KOMO Radio, Recent Posts, Recipes, Snacks

    Quick Pickles and Amazing Flavors

    Who doesn’t love homemade pickles? But sometimes the idea of making them seems daunting. Quick pickle recipes to the rescue – easy to make and store refrigerated! This method is perfect for home pickling beginners.

    My recipe for Quick Summer Garden Pickles is fast and easy. Clean quart jars, then pack with a mixture of vegetables (think baby cukes, carrots, peppers, and cauliflower), garlic, chili pods and some fresh flowering dill too if you have it. Boil up a sweet and tart brine and quickly pour into the veggie-packed jars. Quickly screw on the lid, and cool to room temperature for about 45 minutes, then pop into the refrigerator! In just two days, you’ll have delicious pickles to bring to a picnic or enjoy at a backyard BBQ.

    And pickling isn’t just for veggies. For something a little different, try one of my favorites, Blushing Pickled Peaches! Peaches, fresh ginger, and garlic are covered with a brine of red wine, white vinegar, sugar, salt, coriander seeds and crushed red pepper. They will keep for a month in the refrigerator. Perfectly d’lish to serve up with your favorite cheeses or grilled meats!

    Who’s ready for tangy Blushing Pickled Peaches?

    Here’s to quick pickles! –Kathy

    Blushing Pickled Peaches
    Be sure to use a freestone variety of peach for this recipe such as Elberta or Hale. Great with grilled ham, steaks and poultry, and especially fantastic with thinly sliced prosciutto, crusty French bread and a glass of Northwest Pinot Gris.

    Makes 1 quart

    5 – 6 large ripe peaches, peeled, pitted and quartered, about 2 – 2 1/4 lbs.
    2 1/2-inch piece of fresh ginger cut into 1/4-inch slices (2 oz wt.)
    3 cloves of garlic, peeled
    1/4 cup red wine vinegar
    1/2 cup distilled white vinegar
    1/4 cup water
    1/2 cup sugar
    1 Tbsp. kosher salt or uniodized salt
    1/2 tsp. coriander seeds
    1/2 tsp. crushed red pepper flakes


    Tightly pack the peach halves, alternating with the ginger and garlic, into 2 clean 1/2-quart jars. (or you can do one 1-quart jar).


    Meanwhile, in a small, non-reactive saucepan bring the remaining ingredients to a quick boil over high heat. Immediately remove from heat and ladle over the peaches, making sure to cover them and transferring all the spices to the peaches.


    Brine 2Finished

    Cover tightly and let cool to room temperature. Immediately after cooling, refrigerate peaches. Chill the pickled peaches for 2 – 3 days before using them. They’ll keep 4 weeks in the refrigerator.

    Recipe by Kathy Casey Food Studios® –

    Quick Summer Garden Pickles
    Makes 4 quarts

    Vegetable Mixture:
    7 cups (about 2 lb.) 3/4″-sliced pickling cucumbers
    2 1/2 cups (3/4 lb.) 1/2″-thick-slant-cut carrots
    2 medium jalapeño peppers, cut in half, or 1 large, quartered
    1 1/2 cups (6 oz wt.) 1 1/2″ chunks yellow or white onion
    1 1/2 cups (6 oz wt.) 1 1/2″ chunks red onion
    2 cups (8 oz wt) 1″ chunks red bell peppers (substitute some hot peppers or some of your other favorite summer peppers if desired)
    2 cups (3/4 lb.) 1/2″- to 3/4″-sliced yellow zucchini or yellow squash

    Pickling Brine:
    2 cups white distilled vinegar
    2 cups cider vinegar
    1 3/4 cups water
    1 3/4 cups sugar
    2 Tbsp. pickling spice
    3 Tbsp. kosher salt
    1/4 tsp. crushed red pepper flakes

    Place all vegetables in a large bowl and toss together to mix colors. Divide vegetables among four clean, regular mouth 1-quart canning jars, packing vegetables in tight. Set jars on a dish towel in a draft-free place in the kitchen.

    Place the pickling brine ingredients in a non-aluminum sauce pan over high heat. Bring to a rolling boil and then immediately ladle pickling brine into filled jars, filling to 1/2″ from the top and being sure to cover the vegetables and distribute spices evenly. Immediately cover jar with lid and tighten. Let cool to room temperature, then refrigerate. Let pickle for at least 2 days before eating. Pickles will last refrigerated up to 1 month.

    Recipe by Kathy Casey Food Studios® –

    Posted by Kathy on August 14th, 2015  |  Add Comment |  Posted in Foodie News, Fruit, KOMO Radio, Lifestyle, Recent Posts, Recipes, Snacks

    KUOW – 94.9 FM

    Seattle’s KUOW – 94.9 FM is airing segments on farmers markets. Check out this segment on the Ballard Farmers Market and my tips on how to pick fresh peaches, including my Honey Lavender Peach Fizz recipe!

    And for a demo on how to make Fresh Peach Puree, check out

    Posted by Kathy on August 11th, 2015  |  Add Comment |  Posted in Fruit, Lifestyle, Press, Recent Posts, Recipes, videos

    Celebrate Summer Peaches

    It’s that time of summer when juicy stone fruits come to market: nectarines, plums, apricots and my favorite, PEACHES!

    But isn’t it a bummer when you get a peach and it’s not bursting with that sweet flavor you remember? Well, peach evangelist Jon Rowley has worked to fix that.

    Jon says that when you cut the peach and its super shiny
    that will mean that its gonna be sweet!

    Every year he collaborates with Pence Orchards in Wapato and the organic Frog Hollow Farms in Brentwood, California for Peach-O-Rama, celebrated at Met Markets.


    Each of these peaches must meet a minimum of 13 Brix (that is the measure of the % of sugar in the peach).

    So what to do with all these juicy peaches? Well, eating peaches out of hand is amazingly delicious, but I also love them sliced and tossed in an arugula salad dotted with goat cheese and a sprinkle of toasted northwest hazelnuts.

    And if you love sweetness, there is nothing better than a delicious homemade peach pie. And one of my favorites is with stone fruits: peaches, cherries and apricots. But you can make it with all peaches, too!

    The recipe incorporates my favorite fruit pie tip: put down a thin rolled out layer of almond paste on the bottom crust before filling the pie it adds a delicious flavor and keeps the crust from getting soggy.

    So here’s to the juicy peach! –Kathy

    Pie Holes
    Peaches combine with other Stone Fruits in this delicious pie!

    Summer Stone Fruit Pie with Almond Paste & Amaretto Cream
    You can use all peaches in the pie if you like or a variety of other stone fruits to mix in with the peaches.

    Makes 19-inch pie

    2 cups flour
    1/2 tsp. salt
    1/2 tsp. nutmeg
    6 Tbsp. shortening or lard
    6 Tbsp. cold butter
    2 to 3 Tbsp. ice water

    1/4 cup (2 ounces) marzipan (almond paste)
    3 cups pitted, 1/4-inch-sliced peaches, peeled
    1 cup pitted cherries, (I like to use tart cherries if you can find them, you can also use frozen ones without sugar)
    2 cups pitted, 1/4-inch sliced apricots
    1/4 cup brown sugar
    1/2 cup granulated sugar
    2 Tbsp. flour

    Egg Wash Glaze
    1 egg
    1 Tbsp. milk
    1 Tbsp. coarse sanding sugar (or substitute granulated sugar), optional

    Amaretto Cream
    1/2 cup whipping cream
    1 1/2 Tbsp. brown sugar
    1 Tbsp. amaretto

    Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.

    To make the crust: In a large bowl, combine flour, salt and nutmeg. Cut in shortening and butter until particles are pea-sized. Sprinkle in ice water, 1 tablespoon at a time, mixing gently with a fork until dough comes together in a ball.


    Divide into 2 even pieces. Do not over handle the dough. (If dough is too soft to handle, press gently into 2 disks, wrap in plastic and refrigerate for about 20 minutes before rolling.)

    On a lightly floured surface, roll out the first piece of dough to a bit bigger than your 9-inch pie pan. Brush excess flour off crust, and then gently roll up crust onto rolling pin. Unroll into pie pan and press/fit crust into pan. Roll crust over at edges. Roll out the remaining piece of dough to fit top of pan, but slightly bigger. Cover with plastic and move on to making the filling.


    To fill the pie: Roll marzipan into a ball, then press out into a disk on a piece of plastic wrap. Cover with another piece of plastic wrap. Roll out to fit the bottom crust, place it in the freezer if it’s too soft.


    Remove the top piece of plastic wrap, then turn it into the curst using plastic wrap as a guide, fit marzipan into the bottom crust. (Remove the plastic wrap).


    Place the peaches, cherries and apricots in a large bowl. In a small bowl, mix together sugars and flour, and then sprinkle over the fruit. Toss to coat the fruit well. Place fruit filling into lined pie pan.

    Place remaining dough round on top of pie, trimming off any excess dough. Then crimp bottom and top crusts together with your fingers to seal well and make a pretty edge.

    Mix together egg and milk, and lightly brush on top with a pastry brush. Sprinkle with sanding sugar. Make several slits in the top (or cut fun shapes) to allow steam to escape. Bake in preheated oven for about 1 hour or until crust is golden and filling is cooked through and bubbling. Cool pie on a rack.

    To make Almond Cream: When ready to serve, whip the cream until it begins to thicken. Add remaining ingredients and whip until stiff. Serve dolloped on pieces of pie.

    Recipe by Kathy Casey Food Studios® –

    Posted by Kathy on August 7th, 2015  |  Add Comment |  Posted in dessert, events, Foodie News, Fruit, KOMO Radio, Lifestyle, Recipes