Lifestyle

Good for You Green Smoothies

Eating a healthy breakfast is the key to maintaining a healthy lifestyle and gets your metabolism jump started for the day. But many of us just don’t have time to get it together in the mornings. This is where quick smoothies come in!

Now you have probably seen a lot of people drinking green things these days, such as juice, smoothies and kale is the star of the green! It’s reportedly among the most nutrient dense foods on the planet and very high in fiber – so perfect in helping you feel full.

But sometimes purchased juices and smoothies can be really high in calories and sugar. With all that sugar, that kind of defeats the purpose.

Here is my favorite go to Green Smoothie:

    •1 – 2 leaves of Kale torn up
    •1/2 a ripe banana
    •Tiny touch of honey or maple syrup (not too much now or leave it our entirely)
    •1/2 cup fat free plain Greek yogurt (or fat free coconut milk for a dairy-free option – this is the fresh refrigerated coconut milk)
    •3/4 – 1 cup of ice

Green Smoothies

Tear the kale leaves up and drop into a blender cup. Add in the rest of the ingredients. Blend it up until totally smooth and brilliant green – I have a Vitamix blender and LOVE it!

You can add other healthful additions right before blending, too. Think matcha powder, flax seeds, goji berries, and even almond butter or organic coconut oil. These all are great smoothie boosters and great for you.

So go Green and Jump start your day with a homemade smoothie! –Kathy

Posted by Kathy on January 7th, 2016  |  Add Comment |  Posted in Foodie News, Fruit, Lifestyle, Recipes

Holiday Desserts We Love

We all have our dessert traditions: those sweet treats that have been passed down the generations, shared from friends and family.

Maybe its Mom’s Ice Box Sugar Cookies, rolled out with love and cut from Great-Great Grandma’s cutters. You know: the reindeer, Christmas tree, festive snowman, and star. Then decorated with lots of icing, silver balls, and sprinkles. Or boxes of homemade fudge wrapped in wax paper and delivered in that special holiday tin.

How cool that these days you can just hop online and see what other’s sweet traditions are. Blogs, newsletters, Facebook pages, Pinterest, and Instagram – all bring us new and d’lish inspiration these days. It’s like having a recipe file at your fingertips!

And there is something to be said of that. Mom’s tattered and stained recipe card, with hand-written notes has that special love on it that is sure to come through in the final dish. So it’s important that these holiday traditions be passed on. Here’s a link to my Mom’s Gumdrop Cookies that I grew up with!

I like to preserve these well-worn recipes. Why not create a little digital book with your most cherished family and friends recipes to pass to those you love this holiday season.

Kathy Casey's "Over 21" Real Fruit Cakes made with Maker's Mark
Who wants a slice of my Over 21 “Real Fruit” Cakes made with Maker’s Mark?

My Grandma always baked amazing fruitcake – I took her recipe and have now given it my own spin by soaking dried fruits in Maker’s Mark bourbon, then mixing it with spiced batter and lots of toasted nuts. You can get my Over 21 “Real Fruit” Cakes while supplies last (available online or at my Food Studios in Ballard).

My tradition is to have a slice toasted on Christmas morning with a big cup of coffee! –Kathy

Posted by Kathy on December 17th, 2015  |  Add Comment |  Posted in Books to Cook, Foodie News, KOMO Radio, Lifestyle, Recent Posts

Dishing Up Holiday Flight Tips

The holidays are coming up and for many of us that means some long flights. I fly a lot so I understand that it’s not always fun or d’lish, but I’ve got some tips to help with that.

If you’re flying international on a long flight, definitely pack some food. Make sure to bring compact thing and nutritious items that won’t go bad.

Some of my go-to’s are:

    •Protein bars
    •Laughing Cow Cheese wedges (these are ok at room temp)
    •Almonds
    •Easy peel clementines or mandarins
    •Baby carrots
    •Baggies of crackers or gluten-free snacks

And don’t forget snacks for the kids that are not messy or smelly!

Stay away from high sodium tomato juice and Bloody Mary’s (tempting as they can be) on long flights. Pack only items low in sodium and remember the “puffy factor” when you fly! And keep the coffee to a minimum too; it’s very dehydrating.

Make sure to drink lots of water. I like to pack a lemon and a plastic disposable knife to add a slice or wedge to your water bottle. Then ask the flight attendant to fill it up for you or depending on specific airline regulations, order 2 glasses of water and fill it yourself.

DDL, Quinoa Salad
Dish D’Lish Mediterranean Quinoa Salad is my Favorite for Travel!

It’s always good to be prepared. And if you’re flying out of Sea-Tac check out my Dish D’Lish (pre- & post-security) to pick up some healthy AND tasty in-flight snacks for on the go. Happy travels! -Kathy

Posted by Kathy on December 12th, 2015  |  Add Comment |  Posted in KOMO Radio, Lifestyle, Tasty Travels

Get Saucy

Often the trick to a d’lish dish is the sauce, but sometimes making one can be a bit daunting.

Seattle author Susan Volland’s new book Mastering Sauces: The Home Cook’s Guide to New Techniques for Fresh Flavors will help take the mystery out of making a great sauce. So you can easily splash, slather, drizzle or douse!

Susan Volland - Mastering Sauces

From basic recipes for stock (the building block of sauces) to creative and unique takes on classic recipes, this book has sauces covered from A to Z.

From quick and easy Stir-Together Peanut Butter-Hoisin Dipping Sauce to her recipe for a Vegan Corn “Hollandaise” – there are a lot of ideas to finish off your favorite dish.

Here are some of my favorite tips from her book:

  • How to fancy up a white sauce: think sweet curry or caramelized onion and roasted garlic
  • Not your everyday cheese sauce: with cheddar and ale or tomato and goat cheese
  • Even chocolate gets a tasty saucy twist with ancho chili and fresh mint
  • Susan is an amazing chef and has wanted to write this book for years. It is one of the most comprehensive sauce books of all times and destined to become an eternal classic. Her recipes are always well written and precision tested.

    So crack open a copy of Mastering Sauces and get saucy!

    P.S. – And It’s never too early to think about holiday gifts for your favorite foodie. –Kathy

    Stir-Together Peanut Butter-Hoisin Dipping Sauce
    Susan says: “This sauce is nutty, sweet, and slightly exotic, and, it can be whipped up in less time than the quick-cooking dishes I like to dunk in it: grilled chicken skewers, Vietnamese spring rolls, or pot stickers. Double or triple the recipe, and you can use it to simmer chicken or as a sauce for chewy stir-fried noodles. It keeps well.”

    Yield: 1/2 cup

    1/4 cup hoisin sauce
    1/4 cup water, coconut water, or Really Good Chicken Stock
    2 Tbsp. all-natural peanut butter (smooth or chunky)
    1 Tbsp. fish sauce (or substitute 2 tsp. light soy sauce or tamari)
    2 tsp. sambal oelek or Sriracha, or to taste
    1 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lime juice, Tamarind Water, or rice vinegar

    Whisk together all of the ingredients in a small bowl. Taste and adjust the seasoning. Serve the sauce at room temperature or lightly warmed.

    If storing, cover and refrigerate for up to 2 weeks.

    Recipe from Susan Volland’s Mastering Sauces: The Home Cook’s Guide to New Techniques for Fresh Flavors, W. W. Norton & Co.

    Vegan Corn “Hollandaise”

    Susan says: “The friends and I have introduced this sauce to—even die-hard carnivores and butter lovers—claim to prefer this vegan version to classic hollandaise. The creamy yellow sauce mimics the texture of hollandaise without relying on eggs and butter. It is not as cloying, it’s heat stable, it’s tasty enough to be slurped up by the spoonful, and there is little or no guilt afterward. You will need a few specialty ingredients: miso, nutritional yeast flakes, and arrowroot. These are available at some supermarkets and at natural foods markets. Arrowroot is added for stability and gentle thickening; kudzu root (available at health foods markets) can also be used.”

    Yield: about 1 1/2 cups

    1 1/2 cups water, Corn Stock, or Corncob Mock Stock
    1 cup fresh or thawed frozen yellow corn kernels
    1/3 cup whole raw cashews
    1 Tbsp. white (shiro) miso
    1 tsp. nutritional yeast flakes
    1/2 tsp arrowroot
    1 – 2 tsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice
    1/2 tsp. kosher salt
    Pinch of cayenne pepper or dash of Tabasco

    Combine the water, corn kernels, and cashews in a saucepan, cover, and simmer until the cashews are tender and the corn is very soft, about 20 minutes. Cool slightly.

    Transfer the cashew mixture to a blender, add the miso, yeast, and arrowroot, and puree until very smooth. Strain back into the saucepan, pressing the solids against the sides of the strainer to extract as much smooth pupl and liquid as possible. Heat the sauce over medium heat, stirring constantly, until it is just simmering and has thickened. Season with the lemon juice, salt, and cayenne. Serve warm.

    Unlike hollandaise, this sauce can be refrigerated and reheated. Cover and refrigerate for up to 5 days.

    Recipe from Susan Volland’s Mastering Sauces: The Home Cook’s Guide to New Techniques for Fresh Flavors, W. W. Norton & Co.

    Posted by Kathy on November 12th, 2015  |  Add Comment |  Posted in Books to Cook, Foodie News, KOMO Radio, Lifestyle, other, Recent Posts, Recipes

    Fairmont’s Global Cocktail Menu and Liquid Kitchen in Cheers Magazine

    Earlier this summer the Fairmont Global mixology team visited Liquid Kitchen for a drink development workshop to create a new global cocktail menu – launching later this November. Check out Cheers Magazine for full coverage of the R&D session the Classics, Perfected menu, meet the Fairmont Tastemakers, and recipes for the Right Word and Pomegranate Paloma.

    Posted by Kathy on November 11th, 2015  |  Add Comment |  Posted in Cocktails, Foodie News, Lifestyle, Press, Recent Posts

    Spaghetti Squash Is More Than Just A Pasta Plant

    Most people have had hand at cooking spaghetti squash, and there are a lot of ways to prepare this tasty vegetable.

    This winter squash starts getting popular at the farmers market and grocery store in early fall. The cooked stringy flesh is delicious, but there are a few cooking tricks to know.

    (Photo from Elizabeth Norris’ blog)

    Cut the squash in half length-wise. Make sure to use a good knife and a little muscle – this is a sturdy squash! Once you have the squash in half, scrape out the seeds and pulp the same way you would with any other winter squash.

    Turn the halves cut-side down in a baking dish. Add a little water and roast in a 350 degree oven for about an hour. You’ll know it’s done when a fork slides in and out of the flesh easily. If you’re in a hurry you can quick cook it the same way in the microwave in a glass dish – just blast on high until fork tender.

    Now to get those noodle-like strands out of the shell. Turn the squash up and gently scrape the flesh with a fork along the grain and loosen it up. Then scoop the squash into a bowl and finish how you like.

    It’s a great low-calorie and gluten-free option to traditional pasta for topping with marinara. Or toss it with maple syrup or honey, a little butter or olive oil, some minced fresh herbs and some sea salt for a great side dish to any entrée. –Kathy

    Posted by Kathy Casey on October 29th, 2015  |  Add Comment |  Posted in Foodie News, KOMO Radio, Lifestyle, Recent Posts

    Chia Seeds: the SUPER Food

    Cha-cha-cha-CHIA! Yes, that is what we think of when we say chia. Those funny terra cotta heads sprouting green hair. Until now! Chia seeds are everywhere these days and have been sweeping the nation as an up-and-coming nutritional ingredient.


    Who remembers these commercials?

    Chock full of fiber and omega-3’s, these little seeds can be added to almost anything from juices, baked into muffins or even toasted and sprinkled on a salad! They digest quickly, hydrate your body better than sports drinks, and provide long-lasting energy. Athletes love them!

    When soaked in a liquid, they become gel-like and are virtually tasteless. In Mexico, they are added in a drink called Chia Fresca made with fruit juice and chia seeds which have been plumped in water – sounds so refreshing!  I love a plumped spoonful spooned over a margarita for fun texture!

    I have also used them plumped then blended in a low-fat salad dressing – they work as a natural thickener so you can use less oil, and who doesn’t love that!? If you’re looking to add chia seeds to your diet, check out stores like Whole Foods, PCC, and in the “Natural Foods section” of most grocers to buy them or try them in a fun chia beverage.

    And check out this chia seed post from Wellness Mama for more tricks and tips on what to do with them, including her recipe for healthy homemade pudding.

    So try something new and get your Cha-cha-cha-CHIA on! – Kathy

    To plump chia seeds: Soak 2 Tbsp Chia Seeds with 1 1/2 cups HOT water. Let sit for 1 hour then store refrigerated for up to 2-3 days.

    Posted by Kathy Casey on October 22nd, 2015  |  Add Comment |  Posted in Foodie News, KOMO Radio, Lifestyle, Recent Posts

    Edible Flowers: A Tasty Garden Adventure!

    Food and flowers are wonderful side-by-side, but also can mix together. I was recently introduced to BloomNation (the online flower delivery company- connecting customers with area local florists) and reminded of how flowers on the table not only sets the tone for a meal, but many flowers you love are also be part of the meal.

    From tiny cute Johnny Jump Up’s and frilly dianthus or carnations to lovely robin blue borage flowers – there is a world of tasty, beautiful, edible flowers awaiting you in the garden!

    You can add edible flowers to salads, or to top a dish or cocktail. Freezing edible flowers into ice cubes will definitely snazz up your favorite cocktail.

    Flower Cubes

    I love them in my recipe for Sparkling Lemon Gin Punch.
    St Germain liquor elderflower liquor is added for a lovely floral note.

    Flower Cubes 2

    Here is a quick Overview of how to make Floral Ice Cubes:
    1. Pour distilled water into a large square silicone ice mold 1/4 full and freeze for 2 hours

    Cube Tray

    2. Place edible flowers into ice molds, drizzle with a little water, and return to freezer for 15 -20 minutes

    Flowers in Tray

    3. Fill the ice molds up to completely cover flowers in water and return to freezer and freeze overnight

    Frozen Flowers

    Move on to eating flowers: some of our favorite veggies and greens have tasty blossoms as well. For instance arugula blossoms are beautiful small flowers with a peppery flavor much like the leaves! For larger flowers I like to pull off the flower petals before adding to a dish.

    Edible flower petals are fabulous to roll things in. For an amazing appetizer idea mix soft goat cheese with roasted garlic and some fresh herbs then form into a log in plastic wrap. Pop in the freezer for about 20 minutes or until very firm, then unwrap and roll in edible flower petals. Present on a cheese board or slice into beautiful rounds and serve on crostini – yum!

    For a beautiful brunch dish top your favorite French toast or pancakes with Flower Petal Berry-Butter – it’s a show stopper! The butter is whipped with raspberry jam, sour cream and powdered sugar then rolled into a log. Chilled then pressed with edible flower petals. Just slice and serve.

    Edible flowers are available at farmers markets and also right from you yard! But please remember not all flowers are edible, so double-check before you go into your yard and start munching away—also be sure they are pesticide-free. -Kathy

    Sparkling Lemon Gin Punch
    A delicious and sophisticated punch for any grand get together. For the ultimate presentation, serve over large format ice cubes studded with edible flower petals made in square silicone ice molds.
    Makes about 11 1/2 cups, serves 16 – 18

    1 cup clover or wildflower honey
    2 cups warm water
    1 1/2 cups fresh squeezed Sunkist Meyer Lemon juice or
    3 cups gin (1 750 ml bottle)
    1 cup elderflower liqueur such as St. Germain
    —————————————–
    1 bottle (750 ml) brut Champagne or Prosecco
    Garnish: Sunkist Lemon peel twists

    In a large pitcher, combine the honey and warm water; stir until well dissolved. Then add the lemon juice, gin and elderflower liqueur. (At this point you can refrigerate the punch for service up to 3 days in advance). When ready to serve, pour the chilled mixture into a punch bowl or large drink pitcher (You could split it between 2 pitchers and add half a bottle of champagne to each.) Serve over ice and garnish with lemon twists.

    Recipe by Kathy Casey Liquid Kitchen® for Sunkist

    Flower Petal Berry-Butter
    Borage, Johnny-jump-ups, calendula and rose petals make a pretty combination for this recipe.

    Makes 3/4 cup (6 oz. wt.)

    1/4 pound lightly salted butter, cut in 1/2-inch pieces
    2 Tbsps. seedless berry jam
    2 Tbsps. sour cream
    1 1/2 tsp. sifted powdered sugar
    Dash of ground cinnamon
    3 Tbsps. lightly chopped, unsprayed edible, mild flavored, flower petals

    Whip all the ingredients except flower petals in a blender, food processor or mixer until well blended. Fold in the flower petals. (Or I like to roll the butter into a log in plastic wrap then chill a bit then roll into the flower petals to coat. Wrap and chill – then slice for serving!)

    Recipe by Kathy Casey Food Studios® – www.KathyCasey.com

    Posted by Kathy on September 11th, 2015  |  Add Comment |  Posted in Foodie News, KOMO Radio, Lifestyle, Recent Posts, Recipes
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