KOMO Radio

Recipes and tips as heard on KOMO Radio

Juicing for Joy

As you walk the isle of the grocery store these days, you’ll soon notice the rows and rows of new juices readily available. What is all this juicy business? Well for starters, it’s an easy and d’lish way to get your recommended daily allotment of fruits and vegetables, and not to mention lots of vitamins and nutrients.

So what to do? Got the bucks to buy a bottle? It is pretty convenient to pop into a shop and pick up your favorite blend but over time it can be more expensive than your daily cup of joe.

How about buying a home juicer? Making juice from home can be an investment in time and money up front but with a little planning it truly is the best way to enjoy a juice filled lifestyle and the fresher the juice, the better the health benefits too!

Here’s a favorite blend of mine that you can play with the proportions to fit your pallet. I suggest doing 3 parts veggie or root juice to 1 part fruit juice and any salty, spicy or sour juices should be added to taste.

Beets ( In addition to being sweet and oh so pretty, they are high in antioxidants and have anti-inflammatory benefits)
Celery (It has a touch of natural saltiness, bright flavor, and it’s a natural diuretic)
Slice of fresh ginger
Lemon Juice

Want a powerful punch of antioxidants? How about whipping up a delicious Green Juice like this one from Sunkist.


Photo from Sunkist.com

Made with fresh squeezed grapefruit and orange juice, fresh pressed cider , ginger, and kale juice.  Yum!

Oh and did I mention that fresh veggie juices are great  as a mixer for cocktails too! That’s right. The juicing trend is moving into Happy Hour. Here is one of my favorite cocktails for spring: Make it with your favorite gin!

Carrot Collins
Honey Mint Carrot Collins

The carrot juice adds a subtle sweetness and a beautiful color, while playing well with the botanicals of the gin. Find this recipe and more at www.liquidkitchen.com

Happy Juicing!  –Kathy

Spice It Up!

When we say the word “spice” these days, people will most likely think of something spicy and chili-forward but today I want to shed some light on the warm spices – like aromatic cloves, nutmeg, ginger, allspice and of course cinnamon. They’re not just for apple pie, cookies and cinnamon rolls either.

Photo from The Kitchn.com

In ancient times, spices were used as currency to do all types of trade and these warm spices have been used from Morocco to China for thousands of years.

In the Middle East, you will commonly find these flavors used for savory rubs on meats like lamb and in curries and stews. In India, cinnamon will often be used to flavor rice.

They are not only delicious, lots of research has shown these spices have been linked to amazing health benefits, like reducing blood pressure, improving cholesterol levels, and lowering heart disease risks.

Grandma may have told you to chew on a clove for a toothache, but now we know it’s because they’re great as an anti-inflammatory and have beneficial antioxidants. Did you know allspice has amazing detoxifying benefits too?

It’s easy to spice things up with these warm and flavorful spices. If you’re a juicer, try adding a pinch of your favorite aromatic spice blend to your recipe, or add in a cinnamon stick and a few cloves to your next batch of steamed rice, pasta sauce, or vegetables stew. For something sweet, mix 1/4 teaspoon of cinnamon and nutmeg into your favorite cocoa mix for a wonderful hot cocoa. They also add wonderful warmth to coffees and teas. If you toast your spices before you add them to your dishes, it opens them up and brings out their flavors even more.

These simple spice staples can make a regular dish exotic in no time so try experimenting with warm spices in your dishes and find your new favorite “secret ingredient”– Kathy


Spice Blend Seasoning Guide

Apply spice blends more liberally than just salt and pepper since there are a lot of other ingredients besides the S&P. Also, you may want to put the spices on meat and seafoods a little while before cooking to allow the flavors time to penetrate.

Use about 1/8 – 1/4 teaspoon per large shrimp or scallop, about 1/2 teaspoon per small chicken breast or fish fillet, and about 3/4 – 1 teaspoon for a large steak.


Perfectly Persian Spice

A great blend to season up chicken, lamb, pork, grilled eggplant, onions or white fish.

Makes about scant 1/2 cup

1/4 cup kosher salt
1/4 tsp. cayenne pepper
1/4 tsp. ground cloves
1 tsp. ground cinnamon
1 tsp. ground coriander
1/2 tsp. ground cumin
1 tsp. mild curry powder
2 tbsp. sugar

Mix ingredients together well. Store in an airtight container if not using immediately. Be sure to re-mix after storing because ingredients will settle out a bit.


Star Anise Sprinkle

Sprinkle on tuna, salmon, chicken, duck, pork, sautéed or roasted carrots, steamed rice, or use in a quick onion or cucumber pickle.

Makes 1/2 cup

2 whole cinnamon sticks, broken into pieces
1/4 cup star anise
2 tsp. whole black peppercorns
1 tsp. whole coriander seeds
1 1/2 tsp. dry orange peel
1/4 cup kosher salt
2 tbsp. sugar

In a spice grinder or small coffee grinder, process spices to a medium-ground consistency; do not grind too fine. Mix spices with salt and sugar.

Copyright 2016 by Kathy Casey.

Posted by Kathy on March 31st, 2016  |  Add Comment |  Posted in Kathy Casey, KOMO Radio, Recent Posts, Recipes

Snackable Videos

Have you seen all the crazy food videos on Facebook from Tasty, Tastemade, and Buzzfeed Food? These are Snack Sized Videos featuring recipes that are not only visually appealing, but are quick to make and delicious to eat. I like to call this “Speed Scratch Cooking” and they are blowing up right now on social media, offering creative twists on classic comfort foods.

We are all busy these days, running from one appointment to the next. When you throw in a few kids, a dog, and let’s not forget the friends and family, who has time for a home cooked meal? These videos offer lots of variety and endless ideas so there is something for everyone.

For example – have you seen all the fun things you can put on a waffle iron? This Waffle Iron Mac & Cheese from Hungry takes waffles to the next level with chilled Mac & Cheese, bacon, green onions, and MORE CHEESE, pressed into a waffle iron until crispy and delicious then topped with all kinds of fun toppings. Who can say no to that? Yum!



Buzzfeed also has its share of waffle iron goodies like these All Day Breakfast BurgersCinnamon Roll Waffles with Nutella, or Ham and Cheese Waffles, and more.

Beyond the quick fixes, these videos also have unique and crafty ways to use up left overs or re-imagine a kitchen staple in new and exciting ways. Like this Ice Cream Bread! Start with melted vanilla ice cream, mix in flour, and all kinds of colorful sprinkles and jimmies, bake it, and voila! Super colorful and tasty dessert bread that will have everyone asking for more.

Ice Cream Bread on Cosmopolitan.com

The best thing about many of these recipe videos is they only have 3 or 4 ingredients that you may already have in your pantry which is great for a last minute meal or appetizer, just type in your ingredients and see what pops up! –Kathy

Hop To It – Easter is on its way!

Easter Sunday is coming up, so what will you do with all that leftover booty? You know – the eggs, the candies, the marshmallowy Peeps?

Of course there will be egg salad sandwiches for days BUT let’s get creative with it! How about adding in chopped bacon or some sassy curry. Try mixing salsa in your favorite egg salad recipe then rolling it up with some avocados in tortillas for a quick breakfast on the go.

D'Lish Deviled Eggs
And you know how much I love deviled eggs!

For a beautiful spring presentation, you can do a quick beet pickle. Soak shelled-hard cooked eggs in a sweet & tart beet juice marinade. Then cut and fill. Beautiful and d’lish!

Beet’ing Heart Deviled Eggs!

Now, what do you do with that candy after the hunt? Well I’ve got you covered with my recipe for Jelly-Bean Rice Crispy Tweeps – a fun and festive twist on the beloved rice crispy treats. And yes you can garnish with the peep heads…

Save the Peep Heads for Garnish

And for the adults, steal a few of the kids chocolate bunnies and stir yourself up some Bunny’Licious Boozy Chocolate Sauce using a splash of your favorite liqueur (take out the liqueur for a kid friendly version, but hey, they have already had their treats!). Serve it over ice cream with a few peeps for garnish!

So hop to it and have a Happy Easter! –Kathy

Jelly Bean Rice Crispy Tweeps
Makes 30 treats

3 Tbsp. butter
6 packages yellow Peeps® – 30 peeps (you can use bunnies too for pink treats)
6 cups Rice Krispies® cereal
1 cup small jellybeans

Pull 30 of the peeps heads off and set aside for garnish.


In a large sauce pan heat butter over low heat until melted. Then add peeps and stir over low heat until melted. Then stir in cereal and jellybeans until cereal is well coated and jellybeans are distributed.

Place mixture in a greased 8″x8″ baking dish. Cover with plastic wrap and press down to compact the crispy treats. Let set for at least 15 minutes before serving. To serve cut (5×6) into 30 squares.

Recipe by Kathy Casey Food Studios®. – www.KathyCasey.com

Bunny’licious Boozy Chocolate Sauce
Makes 4 servings

6 oz of left-over chocolate bunnies
1/4 cup hot, strong brewed coffee
1 Tbsp. liquor such as: Grand Marnier, Canton Ginger Liqueur, Amaretto or Frangelico liqueur (optional)

For drizzling over or dipping in: fresh fruit for dipping cut into chunks, such as: pineapple, strawberries, raspberries, apple wedges and oranges, pound cake chunks, holiday cookies, small chocolate chip cookies, other candy such as Peeps®

Break up or cut bunnies in small pieces (chocolate chip size) into a glass or ceramic bowl and pour hot coffee over them. Stir until chocolate is melted and mixture is smooth. If coffee is not hot enough to melt chocolate, then microwave for 10 seconds. Stir in liqueur if desired.

Transfer mixture to a fondue pot or pretty bowl and serve warm with long forks and lots of goodies for dipping.

Recipe by Kathy Casey Food Studios®. – www.KathyCasey.com

Oysters- A Taste of the Sea

Did you know that northwest oysters are considered some of the best in the world? The reason our oysters taste so great is our clean waters. Different locations and environmental factors give the oysters distinct physical characteristics and flavors. Why just this week I tried a new oyster at The Walrus and the Carpenter: Sea Nymphs from Hama Hama Oyster Co, Hammersley Inlet, Wa – YUM!

Cynthia Nims, oyster aficionado, great friend and author of the new book Oysters: Recipes that Bring Home the Taste of the Sea says, “Oysters are so cool! They are filter feeders, filtering gallons and gallons of water up to 30 to 50 gallons a day.” That gives them their distinctive flavor.

Oysters from our pristine Northwest waters range in size from the tiny Olympias to large Pacifics. Smaller oysters, like my favorite, the Kusshi, are perfect for slurping.


Cynthia’s opening chapter really gets you thinking – “What is it About Oysters?” She adds, “They have inspired hip oyster bars, backyard grilling feasts and elegant celebration meals. They evoke songs, poems, and fashion shows. They satisfy our hunger, fuel our romance and feed our souls.”

Oyster purists say there is never a better way to eat raw oysters than unadorned, MAYBE with a squirt of lemon. For the uninitiated oyster-slurper, this can be a bit scary. Cynthia suggests “If it’s your very first oyster – and having a big glob of cocktail sauce is your training wheels, then go for it.”

Once the training wheels are off, try some naked or with fresh and light toppings like her Kimchi-Cucumber Relish – crisp cucumbers, finely chopped kimchi, rice wine vinegar, and a touch of soy sauce.

“Oysters have a richness that is complimented by things that are fresh, peppery, and a touch acidic”, adds Nims. I agree and love citrusy toppings like chopped tangerine segments, mixed with a little finely minced shallot, a grating of fresh horseradish or a dash of hot sauce and snipped chives –d’lish!

Being a great pal of Cynthia’s also means an invite to “cook book testing night” – which means a delicious evening of oyster recipe tasting: from Grapefruit- Basil Granite for topping raw oysters, or pickly Oysters en Escabeche,  to silky sexy Oyster & Celery Root Bisque –  yum!

Oysters, celebrate this tasty bivalve in every way, you’ll be sure to find a new favorite oyster recipe – I know I did!  – Kathy

Kimchi-Cucumber Relish
Enjoy on freshly shucked oysters.

Makes 1 cup, enough for about 4 dozen half-shell oysters

3/4 cup peeled and seeded finely chopped cucumber
1/4 cup finely chopped kimchi
1 tsp. unseasoned rice vinegar, plus more to taste
1/4 tsp. soy sauce, plus more to taste (optional)


In a small bowl, stir together the cucumber, kimchi, rice vinegar, and soy sauce. Taste for seasoning, adding a bit more vinegar or soy sauce to taste. Let the relish sit for about 30 minutes, stirring occasionally, to allow the flavors to blend.

Transfer the relish to small ramekin or other small serving dish and refrigerate until ready to serve, up to 1 hour.

Photo and Recipe from Oysters: Recipes that Bring Home the Taste of the Sea by Cynthia Nims, Sasquatch Books. Follow Cynthia on Facebook and Twitter.

Kathy’s Favorite Seattle Oyster Spots for Slurping:
The Walrus and the Carpenter
Taylor Oyster Bars

Posted by Kathy on March 10th, 2016  |  Add Comment |  Posted in Books to Cook, Foodie News, Kathy Casey, KOMO Radio, My Seattle, Recent Posts, Recipes, seafood

Is Cauliflower the New Kale?

Cauliflower seems to be gaining momentum in the hip veggie arena these days, which is great. It’s so good for you.

High in Vitamin K, cauliflower provides us with one of the hallmark anti-inflammatory nutrients. It’s also an excellent source of Vitamin C and low in calories. Gotta love that!

It can be boiled, steamed, roasted, pickled, or eaten raw! Although so tasty topped with cheese sauce, there are lots of healthy and amazingly tasty ways to cook up a head of cauliflower.

Oven roasting gives it a nice sweetness and a little bit of a nutty flavor. But these days the Cauliflower Steak is all the rage! Cut thick slices from the middle of the head and grill until tender.


Grilled Cauliflower Steaks with Red Curry Puree. Photo by Kathy Casey Food Studios®.

You can cut up the rest of the florets, cook in coconut milk with spices like red curry, ginger and garlic, then blend to make a d’lish puree to serve with your “cauliflower steaks!” Healthy and delicious!

And I know the cheddar and cauliflower combo is hard to beat so I whipped up a recipe for a Cauliflower Cheddar Custard! Serve this rich and delicious savory custard next to a tasty steak or a lovely crisp green salad.

Here’s to great health with cauliflower! -Kathy


Grilled Cauliflower Steaks with Red Curry Puree
Makes 3 entrée servings or 6 as a side dish

1 large head cauliflower
1 Tbsp. olive oil for grill
kosher salt and pepper to taste

1/2 tsp olive oil
2 tsp minced fresh garlic
1 tsp minced fresh ginger
1/2 tsp Thai red curry paste
1 cup non-fat milk
1/2 tsp kosher salt
1 Tbsp fresh lime juice
kosher salt and pepper for cauliflower

Garnish: fresh chopped mint and cilantro, lime wedges and sliced cucumber if desired

Heat oven to 375 degrees.

Cut 3 large 1-inch steaks out of the center of the cauliflower. Cut each one in half. Set aside.

Cut remaining cauliflower into florets to produce about 3 cups.

In a medium saucepan, heat the 1/2 tsp olive oil over medium heat. Add the garlic and ginger and sauté until just tender but not browned. Stir in the curry paste and then add the milk, salt, lime juice, and the 3 cups of florets. Increase heat to medium high, cover tightly and simmer cauliflower until cooked tender – about 10–12 minutes.

Remove from heat and carefully transfer the cauliflower and liquid to a blender or food processor. Cover the lid with a towel and process until smooth. Taste for seasoning and keep warm.

Meanwhile heat a grill pan over medium-high heat. Brush cauliflower steaks lightly with olive oil.

Place cauliflower steaks in pre-heated pan, season with salt and pepper and cook on each side until nicely grill marked (about 5 min on each side) and then move pan to the oven and continue cooking steaks until just tender (about 7-10 minutes). Or you can cook the cauliflower on an outdoor grill all the way, with the lid down to assist with cooking.

To serve, spoon some of the cauliflower puree on plates. Top with grilled cauliflower, and garnish with chopped herbs, lime wedges for squeezing and cucumber if desired.

Recipe by Kathy Casey Food Studios®. – www.KathyCasey.com


Cauliflower Cheddar Custard
This makes an excellent light supper served with a salad, or an accompaniment to a big juicy grilled steak.

Makes 4 servings

1 cup milk
1 1/2 cups finely chopped cauliflower
1 Tbsp. minced garlic
1 tsp salt
tiny pinch cayenne pepper
2 tsp cornstarch
1 Tbsp. sherry wine
4 eggs
1 cup (5 ounces) shredded cheddar cheese

In a small saucepan, combine the milk, cauliflower, garlic, salt and cayenne. Heat over medium heat until simmering, then cook for about 5 minutes or until cauliflower is very tender. (Do not let it boil.)

In a small cup or bowl, mix the cornstarch and sherry until smooth. Whisk this slurry into the hot mixture and let cook for about 1 minute or until thickened. Remove from heat.

In a large bowl, whisk together the eggs until well combined, and then stir in 1/3 of the hot cauliflower mixture. Then add the remaining hot cauliflower mixture and stir well to combine. Fold in the cheese.

Meanwhile, preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Divide mixture between 4 well-buttered 6-ounce custard cups. (Use a ladle to do this and be sure to stir up mixture well when portioning.) Set custard cups on a rimmed baking pan and bake for about 20 minutes or until the tops are golden and a wooden toothpick inserted in the centers comes out just barely clean. The centers should still be just slightly wiggly as the custards will continue cooking for a bit after they come out of the oven.

Serve in the baking cups, or let cool for a couple of minutes, then run a knife around the edges and turn out into plates to serve.

Recipe by Kathy Casey Food Studios®. – www.KathyCasey.com



Posted by Kathy on March 3rd, 2016  |  Add Comment |  Posted in KOMO Radio, other, Recent Posts, Recipes

Staying Toasty with a Hot Toddy!

Winter warmers are the best. They can be the remedy for those aches and pains that come along with the dreaded winter cold or flu OR they can warm your bones after a long day out on the slopes.

One of my favorites is the Hot Toddy. For decades people have used the hot toddy as a natural remedy for easing that tickle in the throat. Think of it like chicken soup, but with a bit more kick!

The reason it works is that the whiskey eases our congestion and helps you fall asleep.

Now let’s make one:

  • -Combine your favorite whiskey (about 1 1/2 ounces) with spiced herbal tea OR just hot water.
    -Drizzle in local honey.
    -Add squeeze of fresh lemon.
    -Don’t forget the cinnamon stick for stirring!

By the time you finish the drink, hopefully that cough will have calmed down a bit. And you’re feeling a bit sleepy so you can get some much needed rest.


Check out these 6 inspired recipes on Wine Enthusiast

Be sure not to over-indulge as more than one may actually have the reverse effect on your symptoms. So stick to one and you should be good to go.

Cheers! –Kathy


Posted by Kathy on February 25th, 2016  |  Add Comment |  Posted in Cocktails, KOMO Radio, Lifestyle, Recent Posts

Money Saving Braising

Looking to make a meal to impress, but don’t want to break the bank? Braising can make even the toughest cuts of meat, an inexpensive, melt-in-your-mouth experience.

Braising is a loooooong, slow-cooking method that can be done on the stove-top, in the oven, or in a crock pot. What a great treatment for less tender, more flavorful cuts of meat. Think beef chuck, lamb shanks, chicken legs, or short ribs. These tough cuts are less expensive, but really taste like a million bucks if they’re cooked low and slow. Perfect for a lazy Sunday supper.

First, season up your meat, then give it a good sear in a hot pan with a little oil. Add in tasty ingredients like wine, herbs, and veggies. Cover tightly and pop the pan in an oven on LOW HEAT (around 300 – 325 degrees) and forget about it for a few hours! Now the hard part: be patient. Don’t try to rush the process; this takes time.

Once it’s finished, don’t forget about all that juicy braising liquid. It’s perfect to make a tasty sauce with!

One of my favorite dishes to make is my Slow Cooked Roasted Beef with Half a Bottle of Wine and 20 Cloves of Garlic. Perfect for a comfort food Sunday night snuggled up with some fluffy mashed potatoes – yum!

Here’s to slow cooking! –Kathy

Slow-Cooked Roast Beef with Half a Bottle of Wine and 20 Cloves of Garlic

If the sauce is not thick enough, make a cornstarch slurry using 1 Tbsp cornstarch mixed with 2 Tbsp water. Whisk the slurry into the simmering sauce, a little at a time, until the desired thickness is reached.

Makes 6 to 8 generous servings

1 (3- to 3 1/2-pound) beef chuck roast
2 Tbsp vegetable oil
1 Tbsp kosher salt
1/2 tsp black pepper
1 large onion, peeled and cut into 8 wedges
1 1/2 cups sliced mushrooms
1/2 bottle (about 1 1/2 cups) red wine
3 Tbsp flour
20 cloves garlic, peeled
5 sprigs fresh thyme
4 carrots, cut into 1 1/2-inch pieces
4 stalks celery, cut into 1 1/2-inch pieces
1 Tbsp chopped fresh basil, optional

Preheat an oven to 325°F.

With paper towels, pat the roast dry. Heat the oil in a large ovenproof Dutch oven over high heat until hot.

Rub the roast with salt and pepper. Place in the hot pan and sear on all sides until well browned. Remove the meat to a platter. Add the onion wedges and mushrooms to the pan and stir around for a few minutes, then tuck the roast back into the pan, pulling the onion and mushroom mixture up from under the roast.

Whisk together the wine and flour until smooth and add to the roasting pan, along with the garlic and thyme. Bring to a simmer, then cover and transfer the pan to the oven.

Roast for about 2 hours. Add the carrots and celery and continue to roast for 1/2 hour to 1 hour, or until meat is fork-tender.

Stir the basil into the sauce.

Cut roast into thick slices or large chunks, depending on your preference, and serve with the sauce drizzled over it.

Recipe from Dishing with Kathy Casey.


Posted by Kathy on February 18th, 2016  |  Add Comment |  Posted in Amazon, Books to Cook, KOMO Radio, meats, Recent Posts, Recipes