seafood

D’lish Deviled Eggs on New Day Northwest!

I had a blast with King 5’s Margaret Larson on New Day Northwest earlier this morning talking all about my latest book, D’Lish Deviled Eggs! With over 50 classic and creative recipes, there’s definitely an egg for everyone and every occasion.

Beet'ing Heart
Beet’ing Heart Deviled Eggs! Love the color!

(Photo by Kathy Casey Food Studios from D’Lish Deviled Eggs, Andrews McMeel Publishing)

Want to know my tips and secrets for how to make the perfect deviled egg? Start by making sure to hard-cook (not boil!) your eggs with my tip below. Then dress your deviled with my tasty variations: Goat Cheese and Peppadew, “California Roll,” and Beet’ing Heart deviled eggs.

California Roll egg

Creative way of incorporating sushi into an egg app: “California Roll” Deviled Eggs topped with
Alaska King Crab, cucumber, furikake and tobiko.
(Photo by Kathy Casey Food Studios from D’Lish Deviled Eggs, Andrews McMeel Publishing)

For another fun deviled egg recipe, try my Emerald Asparagus & Sweet Onion Deviled Eggs found in the Seattle Time’s Pacific NW Magazine! Here’s to a wonderful spring season and Easter holiday! -Kathy

Goat Cheese and Peppadew Eggs
Creamy goat cheese and tangy sweet Peppadew peppers tango with a hit of Tabasco heat in this sexy deviled egg combo. Topped with a Spanish Marcona almond for a touch of salty crunch, these zippy bites are sure to please everyone’s palate.

Makes 24

1 dozen hard-cooked eggs (recipe follows)

Filling
3 to 4 ounces chèvre-style goat cheese (about 1/2 cup)
1/4 cup mayonnaise
1 1/2 teaspoons Tabasco sauce
8 Peppadew peppers, drained well and finely chopped (about 1/4 cup)

Topping
24 Marcona almonds
2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley

Halve the eggs lengthwise and transfer the yolks to a mixing bowl. Set the egg white halves on a platter, cover, and refrigerate.

With a fork, mash the yolks to a smooth consistency. Add the goat cheese, mayonnaise, Tabasco, and mix until smooth. (You can also do this in a mixing bowl with a whip attachment.) Stir in the peppers.

Spoon the mixture into a pastry bag fitted with a plain or large star tip, then pipe the mixture evenly into the egg white halves. Or fill eggs with a spoon, dividing filling evenly.

Top each egg half with a Marcona almond and a sprinkle of parsley.

Hard-Cooked Eggs

1 dozen large chicken eggs

Place the eggs in a large nonreactive saucepan and add cold water to 1 inch above the eggs. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Turn off the heat and let the eggs sit for 10 minutes. Remove from the stove and run cool water over the eggs in the pan until they are cooled. When cool, carefully peel them under running water.

Recipe from D’Lish Deviled Eggs by Kathy Casey, Andrews McMeel Publishing

“California Roll” Deviled Eggs
Part of the allure of sushi is the beautiful presentation, and these California-roll-inspired eggs are dressed to impress. The wasabi and avocado filling whips up in no time, so you can spend a little longer making them look like the work of art they are!

Makes 24

1 dozen hard-cooked eggs

Filling
1/2 ripe avocado
3 tablespoons mayonnaise
1 tablespoon purchased wasabi paste (or 1 tablespoon wasabi powder mixed with 1 tablespoon water)
1/4 teaspoon salt

Topping
2 ounces Alaska King Crab meat (about 1/3 to 1/2 cup)
24 small cucumber fans (see tip)
Nori komi furikake (sesame seed–seaweed sprinkle)
2 tablespoons tobiko (flying fish roe)

Halve the eggs lengthwise and transfer the yolks to a small bowl. Set the egg white halves on a platter, cover, and refrigerate.

In a mixing bowl, mash the avocado well with a fork, then add the yolks and mash to a smooth consistency. Add the mayonnaise, wasabi paste, and salt, and mix until smooth.

Spoon the mixture into a pastry bag fitted with a plain or large star tip, then pipe the mixture evenly into the egg white halves. Or fill the eggs with a spoon, dividing the filling evenly.

Top each egg half with a little crabmeat, a cucumber fan, a sprinkle of furikake, and about 1/4 teaspoon tobiko.

Tip: To make tiny cucumber fans, quarter a 4-inch piece of English cucumber lengthwise. Then cut each quarter into 18 thin slices—the goal is to get 3 tiny slices per “fan.” See photo for reference.

Recipe from D’Lish Deviled Eggs by Kathy Casey, Andrews McMeel Publishing

Beet’ing Heart Deviled Eggs
I’m all for an appetizer that doubles as a fun craft project, and these eggs certainly fit the bill. Pickled beet juice turns the whites a deep pink color and makes these perfect for serving up on Valentine’s Day or Easter. Kids will love helping turn their eggs pink.

Makes 24

1 (15-ounce) can sliced pickled beets
1/2 cup red wine vinegar
1/4 cup sugar
1 dozen hard-cooked eggs

Filling
3 tablespoons mayonnaise
3 tablespoons sour cream
2 tablespoons stone-ground mustard
2 tablespoons minced red onion
1/4 teaspoon sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
Fresh-cracked black pepper

Topping
1/4 cup reserved tiny-diced pickled beets, drained well
2 tablespoons thinly sliced green onion

To pickle the eggs, drain the beet liquid into a deep medium container and reserve the beets separately. Add the red wine vinegar and sugar to the beet liquid and stir to dissolve the sugar. Peel the hard-cooked eggs and add to the mixture, being sure they are submerged. Cover and let sit for at least 2 hours or overnight, refrigerated. Stir often to color evenly.

Drain the eggs well, pat dry on paper towels, and discard the beet liquid. Halve the eggs lengthwise and transfer the yolks to a mixing bowl. Set the egg white halves on a platter, cover, and refrigerate.

To finish the eggs, with a fork, mash the yolks to a smooth consistency. Add the mayonnaise, sour cream, mustard, red onion, sugar, and salt, and mix until smooth. (You can also do this in a mixing bowl with a whip attachment.) Add black pepper to taste.

Spoon the mixture into a pastry bag fitted with a plain or large star tip, then pipe the mixture evenly into the egg white halves. Or fill the eggs with a spoon, dividing the filling evenly.

Top each egg half with 1/2 teaspoon of pickled beets and a sprinkle of green onion.

Tip: For a “polka dot” effect, firmly pack the eggs into a narrow container so that they are all touching, and do not stir them. The eggs will be lighter pink or white where they touch, lending a fun polka dot pattern.

Recipe from D’Lish Deviled Eggs by Kathy Casey, Andrews McMeel Publishing

D’lish Deviled Eggs

Anyone who knows me knows that I love deviled eggs. Whenever I show up to a party with a full party platter of them, they are the first thing to fly off the table!

How much do I love them? Well, I wrote a whole book about them – my new book D’Lish Deviled Eggs features more than 50 classic and creative variations!

dde cover

Everyone has their favorite way of making them. I know that grandma’s classic recipe is always a go-to for most people, but these one-bite (maybe two-bite!) apps are the perfect platform to get inspired with!

From California Roll Deviled Eggs with a filling made with avocado and wasabi topped with crab and cucumber – to sassy Chipotle Eggs to Cheddar and Bacon—there are tons of different takes on the classic and some fun and kitschy variations too. What better way to use up all those hard-boiled eggs after Easter?

D’lish Deviled Eggs is available in books stores, online and digital. Just think, you’ll have over 50 new ideas for your next party appetizer!

Web: www.dlishdeviledeggs.com for more fun deviled egg tips and recipes.

Tweet Tweet: @chickytweets on Twitter!

So get crackin’ and enjoy some d’lish deviled eggs! –Kathy

Chipotle Deviled Eggs

Chipotle Deviled Eggs—yum!
(Photo © Kathy Casey Food Studios from D’Lish Deviled Eggs)

Chipotle Deviled Eggs

I’ve been making these for years and they have become a cocktail-party staple. The spicy tomato topping adds textural and visual pizzazz. Serve these with your favorite margarita for a perfect pairing.

Makes 24

1 dozen hard-cooked eggs (recipe follows)

Filling
3 Tbsps mayonnaise
3 Tbsps regular or low-fat sour cream
1/2 tsp Dijon mustard
1 to 2 Tbsps chipotle chile purée (see tip)
1 tsp minced fresh garlic
1/4 tsp salt
2 Tbsps thinly sliced green onion

Topping
1/2 cup small-diced tomatoes
1 Tbsp minced white onion
2 Tbsps chopped fresh cilantro
1 to 2 tsps chipotle chile purée (see tip)

Halve the eggs lengthwise and transfer the yolks to a mixing bowl. Set the egg white halves on a platter, cover, and refrigerate.

With a fork, mash the yolks to a smooth consistency. Add the mayonnaise, sour cream, mustard, chipotle purée, garlic, and salt, and mix until smooth. (You can also do this in a mixing bowl with a whip attachment.) Stir in the green onion.

Spoon the mixture into a pastry bag fitted with a plain or large star tip, then pipe the mixture evenly into the egg white halves. Or fill the eggs with a spoon, dividing the filling evenly.

To make the topping, in a small bowl, mix together the tomatoes, onion, cilantro, and chipotle purée. Top each egg half with about 1 tsp of the topping.

Tip: To make chipotle chile purée, place canned chipotle peppers in adobo sauce, with the sauce, in a food processor or blender and purée until smooth. Freeze any extra purée for another use.

Hard-Cooked Eggs

1 dozen large chicken eggs

Place the eggs in a large nonreactive saucepan and add cold water to 1 inch above the eggs. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Turn off the heat and let the eggs sit for 10 minutes. Remove from the stove and run cool water over the eggs in the pan until they are cooled. When cool, carefully peel them under running water.

Recipe from D’Lish Deviled Eggs by Kathy Casey, Andrews McMeel Publishing

Posted by Kathy Casey on March 21st, 2013  |  Comments Off |  Posted in Amazon, appetizers, Books to Cook, breakfast, dessert, Foodie News, KOMO Radio, poultry, Recent Posts, Recipes, seafood, sides, Snacks

It’s Razor Clammin’ Time Again!

Every year I look forward to the last weekend in March. Why? Because it’s the Annual Razor Clam Festival!

Taking place in Ocean Shores (Washington), this fun event is going to be bigger than ever this year. They’ve even added an extra day, and a new seafood cooking competition!

The festival runs from 9am to 6pm on Saturday, March 23 and 9am to 4pm on Sunday, March 24 at the Ocean Shores Convention Center.  It is an event for the whole family; with live music, craft vendors, cooking competitions and demonstrations, gift giveaways, and so much more. Kids 12 and under get in free.  Adults are $3.00 for each day or $5.00 for both days. There will be lots of great food and chowder samples of course!  Don’t forget to stop at the various Bloody Mary and beer booths to wash down all that great chow.


The KCFS Crew doing the “Official” Razor Clam Dance!

But the true headliner event is the Clam Chowder Cook-Offs for both the pro and amateur chefs. Each year the festival has an array of contestants enter the Amateur Chowder Cook Off and compete for the best of the best on the Northwest Coast. (My chef team will be judging again this year!) The First Place Winner gets bragging rights for a whole year and will be one of the judges for the Professional Clam Chowder Cook Off at the Festival in 2014. How cool is that!

If you like to forage for your own clams, make sure to check out the Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife for more info on this year’s dig…and don’t forget your clam license and essentials.

Once you’ve reached your razor clam limits, check out this video that my friend Scott Surdyke and I made on how to clean them properly. And for a super tasty way of cooking this bi-valve, try our recipe for our Clam-tastic Razor Clam Fritters with my Rock-the-World Tartar Sauce below.

So pack up your clammin’ gear (including you razor clam license) and head down to Ocean Shores – it’s the clamtastic place to be! –Kathy

Scott & Kathy’s CLAMTASTIC Razor Clam Fritters
Makes 24 – 26 fritters

3 cups chopped/diced razor clams
3 cups Krusteaz Buttermilk Pancake Mix with buttermilk
1/2 cup cornmeal
1 1/2 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp lemon pepper
1 Tbsp minced lemon zest
2 tsp sea salt or kosher salt
Fresh-ground pepper to taste
1 Tbsp minced garlic
3/4 cup clam nectar (or reserved clam juice)
1/4 cup Northwest amber beer, flat
2 eggs, whisked
1/2 cup minced celery
3/4 cup fresh corn kernels
6 scallions/green onions, thinly sliced
1/2 cup chopped orange or red bell pepper (about 1/2 pepper)
—————————————————
Crisco shortening for frying
Lemon wedges for garnish/squeezing
Kathy Casey’s Ultimate Rock-the-World Tartar Sauce (recipe follows)

Drain the clams and save any juice for use in recipe.
In a large bowl combine the Krusteaz, corn meal, baking powder, lemon pepper, zest, salt and pepper. Stir in the garlic, clam nectar/juice, beer and eggs to combine.
Then fold in the celery, corn, green onions, bell pepper and drained clams.

Heat 2-inches of Crisco in a large cast iron skilled till hot – about 375 degrees. Scoop out fritters a few at time – I use a 1/4 cup measure – they should be kind of spread out and not too thick. Fry on first side till golden and then flip over. Continue frying till golden and cooked through. Drain on paper towels. Cook fritters in batches being sure oil stays hot. Keep fritters warm in a 300 degree oven on a rack if needed – but they are best served right away – the fritter cook will just have to keep cooking! Serve with Rock the World Tartar Sauce and fresh lemons.

Recipe by Scott Surdyke and Kathy Casey

Kathy’s Rock-The-World Tartar Sauce
Makes 2 cups

1 1/2 cups mayonnaise
1/4 cup finely chopped dill pickle or dill pickle relish
2 Tbsps drained capers, chopped
1 green onion, very thinly sliced
1 1/2 tsp Dijon mustard
1/2 tsp Tabasco sauce
2 Tbsps chopped parsley
1/4 tsp celery seed
2 Tbsps fresh lemon juice
1/2 tsp granulated garlic
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp black pepper

In a medium bowl, mix all the ingredients.

Recipe adapted from Kathy Casey’s Northwest Table, Chronicle Books

Posted by Kathy Casey on March 15th, 2013  |  Comments Off |  Posted in events, KOMO Radio, Lifestyle, Recent Posts, Recipes, seafood, Tasty Travels

Wanderlust & Lipstick

Fantastic interview and article in Wanderlust & Lipstick! Seattle summers are gorgeous when the warm sun is out and with friends all around… with great foods and drinks! Check out my Seattle summer hot spots and my recipes for Summer Sangria, Veggie & Grilled Pita Greek Salad, and Grilled Alaskan Salmon with Garlic & Herbs

Kathy Casey

They say that summer in Seattle arrives on July 5—leaving us waiting and waiting until the Fourth of July holiday, and then treating us to its lovely sunny days for at least a couple of months. This year I’m not so sure that it’s actually officially arrived. Sure, we’ve had sunshine and some pleasant temperatures, but we’ve also had our share of overcast skies and thunderstorms. Still, however, it’s worth being ready to take advantage of sunny days each and every time they come.

To continue reading and for the recipes, click here.

Posted by Kathy Casey on July 18th, 2012  |  Comments Off |  Posted in Restaurants, appetizers, Cocktails, Foodie News, Lifestyle, Recent Posts, Recipes, salads, seafood, Tasty Travels

Clammin’ Good Times at Ocean Shores!

Towards the end of March, I am always thinking about the beach… not to tan, but to go clamming! Every year I head down to Ocean Shores (about a 4 hour drive from Seattle) to host their annual Razor Clam Festival!   This year will be my fourth time hosting this clam-tastic celebration and each year, my team and I have had an amazing great time.

The weekend starts with an all-you-can-eat Fireman’s Pancake Breakfast served by the Ocean Shores Firefighters — all for $5! (And yes, they are cute!)

Throughout the entire day, there’ll be lots to keep you and the family entertained. From live music and lots of clam chowder to taste as well as an auction of decorated clam shovels and tubes (sometimes called clam “guns”) as well as beer & Bloody Mary bars. Of course, there’s also the Clam Chowder Cook-Off Competition which my team and I will be judging.


My crew and I doing the “Official” Razor Clam Festival Dance…eating all that chowder makes us silly!

If you like to dig your razor clams, check out the Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife website for more info on this year’s dig…and don’t forget your clam license and essentials!

Once you’ve reached your razor clam limits, it’s time to clean your clams. If you need a demo don’t fret as my friend Scott Surdyke and I share some of our cleaning tips in this video. Then it’s time to start cooking and one of my favorite ways of cooking this bi-valve is in a recipe that Scott and I created together. I’ve shared our recipe for our Clam-tastic Razor Clam Fritters dipped in my Rock-the-World Tartar Sauce below.

Think clear skies, pack warm and head on over to Ocean Shores for a clam’tastic time! –Kathy

Scott & Kathy’s CLAM-TASTIC Razor Clam Fritters
Makes 24 – 26 fritters

3 cups chopped/diced razor clams
3 cups Krusteaz Buttermilk Pancake Mix with buttermilk
1/2 cup cornmeal
1 1/2 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp lemon pepper
1 Tbsp minced lemon zest
2 tsp sea salt or kosher salt
Fresh-ground pepper to taste
1 Tbsp minced garlic
3/4 cup clam nectar (or reserved clam juice)
1/4 cup Northwest amber beer, flat
2 eggs, whisked
1/2 cup minced celery
3/4 cup fresh corn kernels
6 scallions/green onions, thinly sliced
1/2 cup chopped orange or red bell pepper (about 1/2 pepper)
—————————————————
Crisco shortening for frying
Lemon wedges for garnish/squeezing
Kathy Casey’s Ultimate Rock-the-World Tartar Sauce (recipe follows)

Drain the clams and save any juice for use in recipe.
In a large bowl combine the Krusteaz, corn meal, baking powder, lemon pepper, zest, salt and pepper. Stir in the garlic, clam nectar/juice, beer and eggs to combine.
Then fold in the celery, corn, green onions, bell pepper and drained clams.

Heat 2-inches of Crisco in a large cast iron skilled till hot – about 375 degrees. Scoop out fritters a few at time – I use a 1/4 cup measure – they should be kind of spread out and not too thick. Fry on first side till golden and then flip over. Continue frying till golden and cooked through. Drain on paper towels. Cook fritters in batches being sure oil stays hot. Keep fritters warm in a 300 degree oven on a rack if needed – but they are best served right away – the fritter cook will just have to keep cooking! Serve with Rock the World Tartar Sauce and fresh lemons.

Recipe by Scott Surdyke and Kathy Casey

Kathy’s Rock-The-World Tartar Sauce
Makes 2 cups

1 1/2 cups mayonnaise
1/4 cup finely chopped dill pickle or dill pickle relish
2 Tbsps drained capers, chopped
1 green onion, very thinly sliced
1 1/2 tsp Dijon mustard
1/2 tsp Tabasco sauce
2 Tbsps chopped parsley
1/4 tsp celery seed
2 Tbsps fresh lemon juice
1/2 tsp granulated garlic
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp black pepper

In a medium bowl, mix all the ingredients.

Recipe adapted from Kathy Casey’s Northwest Table, Chronicle Books

Posted by Kathy Casey on March 8th, 2012  |  Comments Off |  Posted in Contests, KOMO Radio, Lifestyle, Recent Posts, Recipes, seafood, Tasty Travels

Oyster Time

Clear uncontaminated waters are pivotal in growing high-quality oysters, especially in the Pacific Northwest. The mollusks filter feed gallons of water a day and gain their subtle distinctive flavors from their environment.

Another factor in raising these delectable bi-valves is the water temperature. Did you know that the meat becomes tastier and firmer as the temperature drops? Who knew!

Oysters are best eaten during the cold months when the waters are crisp. Pacific Northwest seafood “guru” Jon Rowley says, “You can tell it’s oyster time when the skies turn oyster grey.”

Pacific Northwest oysters range in size from the tiny Olympia (great for oyster virgins) to the extra-large Pacific (good for frying). Smaller oysters, like my favorite, the Kumamoto, are perfect for slurping.

Oyster_Kumo_Group
Kumamoto Oysters
(Photo from Taylor Shellfish)

Oyster purists say there is never a better way to eat raw oysters than unadorned — MAYBE with a squirt of lemon.  For the uninitiated oyster-slurper, this can be a bit scary.  Don’t worry because I have some great ideas to ease you into this.

If you’re brand new to enjoying oysters raw, I have a bevy of simple sauces that you can make that will not mask their delicious flavor. From my Fresh Cocktail Sauce to my Champagne Mignonette Ice, you will love raw oysters in no time.

Don’t fret if raw is not your thing. My Baked Oysters with Savory Mushroom Herb Crust recipe is just for you!

Whether you shuck’em at home or enjoy them cooked or raw at restaurants (such as one of my favorites, the Walrus & the Carpenter in Ballard) get your oysters while the skies are grey.

So get shuckin’ and enjoy! -Kathy

Fresh Cocktail Sauce
Set bowl of Cocktail sauce in the center of a platter of just shucked oysters. Guests can top their oysters with as little or as much as they like.

Makes 2 cups

2 cups ripe tomatoes cut in 1/4″ dice
2 Tbsps very finely minced celery
1 medium, very finely minced shallot (about 2 tablespoons)
1 Tbsp finely chopped fresh parsley
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
1 Tbsp hot prepared horseraddish
1/2 tsp Worcestershire sauce
1/2 tsp Tabasco (or more if you like it spicy)
1/4 tsp black pepper
3/4 tsp salt
1 1/2 tsp sugar
1/8 tsp celery seed

Gently mix together all ingredients.  Chill well before serving.

Recipe by Kathy Casey Food Studios®

Champagne Mignonette Ice
Makes about 2 cups ice, enough to top 5 to 6 dozen oysters

3/4 tsp black peppercorns
1 cup Champagne vinegar
1/3 cup water
1 1/2 tsp very finely minced lemon zest
2 Tbsps minced shallot
1/2 cup Brut Champagne

Prepare the mignonette ice the day before or up to 3 days in advance. Enclose the peppercorns between pieces of plastic wrap and crush well with a heavy pot or mallet (or use a mortar and pestle). In an 8-inch square freezer-proof glass casserole dish or stainless-steel bowl, combine the pepper with the remaining ice ingredients and stir. Cover with plastic wrap and place in the freezer. Every 30 minutes or so, remove from the freezer and stir the mixture with a fork. The mixture should start becoming slushy after about 1 1/2 to 2 hours. When the mixture is icy and completely raked into tiny ice crystals, you can stop the stirring process. Let the mixture freeze overnight, then break up the ice crystals with a fork right before serving.

Serve the ice in a small bowl; guests can spoon a small spoonful over the oysters.

Recipe from Kathy Casey’s Northwest Table, Chronicle Books

Baked Oysters with Savory Mushroom Herb Crust
Make sure to use a hearty-textured bread such as Italian or French style – to provide the desired crumb consistency; avoid soft, airy loaves.

Makes 2 dozen medium oysters on the half-shell

2 cups packed diced firm textured rustic bread
1 cup coarse chopped mushrooms
3 Tbsps cold butter, cut small pieces
1/4 tsp salt
1/4 – 1/2  tsp Tabasco sauce
1/4 cup coarsely chopped fresh parsley
1 tsp minced fresh thyme
1/4 cup (1 oz wt) high quality, shredded Parmesan cheese
2 tsp minced fresh basil
1 Tbsp fresh lemon juice
1/4 tsp fresh ground black pepper
2 dozen medium oysters (3 1/2″ long) in the shell

Place bread cubes and mushrooms in food processor.  Add remaining ingredients, except oysters, and process 30 seconds, or until particles are well chopped and pea-like in texture.  Set aside.

Preheat oven to 475 degrees F.

Shuck oysters, cutting muscle but leaving oyster in the deep shell.  Cover each oyster loosely with 1 rounded tablespoon bread crumb-mushroom mixture, covering entire surface of the oyster.

Arrange oysters on baking sheet and place on middle shelf of oven.  Bake 6 – 8 minutes till topping is golden.  Time carefully — they can overcook and dry out quickly!

Recipe by Kathy Casey Food Studios®

Posted by Kathy Casey on February 16th, 2012  |  Comments Off |  Posted in Restaurants, Foodie News, KOMO Radio, Recent Posts, Recipes, seafood

The Seattle Times

If you’re looking for other great tips, techniques and advice as well as recipes for a fantastic Thanksgiving Day feast, check out the annual Seattle Times’ holiday guide written by Nancy Leson. This guide along with the recipes features a lot of tips and tricks from Seattle chefs and restauranteurs (including myself!), with all sorts of appetizers, entrees, sides and even desserts! Check it out for a d’lish read and try out some of the recipes yourself; you’ll have your guests asking for more in no time!

Posted by Kathy Casey on November 16th, 2011  |  Comments Off |  Posted in Restaurants, appetizers, dessert, Foodie News, Fruit, Lifestyle, meats, poultry, Recent Posts, Recipes, seafood, sides, Snacks

It’s Mediterranean Mussel Season!

Northwest cuisine is full of iconic flavors, and mussels are an integral part of the profile. I’m pretty equal opportunity when it comes to my love for these delicious bivalves, but I have a special soft spot for Puget Sound–grown Mediterranean mussels. This sweet plump variety is characterized by shiny black shells and easily removable beards. The mussels are super-quick to cook for an easy appetizer or dinner on the fly. Their season peaks in late summer to early fall—around the same time as tomatoes, says Jon Rowley, seafood guru to Taylor Shellfish.

Now, we know mussels are d’lish steamed in white wine, garlic and butter, but Mediterraneans in particular are extremely versatile. Showcase their big, bold flavor with a dish of Pale Ale Oven-Roasted Mussels. Toss them into a big cast-iron skillet with some local beer, garlic and rosemary, then pop the whole shebang in a very hot oven—instant one-bite apps with their own built-in spoons! Don’t forget some bread to soak up that tasty broth!

“Meds” are at their best right now. If you happen to be in Seattle, pick up some of these yummy Northwest favorites at Taylor Shellfish’s new store on Capitol Hill. Or plan a day trip and head out to beautiful Chuckanut Drive to their farm where they have a store on site and learn all there is to know about raising/harvesting mussels and other local treats straight from the Pacific.

Cook up some of these delicious mussels before their season is over! – Kathy

Pale Ale Oven-Roasted Mussels

Makes 4 servings as a shared appetizer, or 2 as a light entrée

2 pounds Mediterranean mussels, rinsed and debearded
1 Tbsp minced fresh garlic
1/8 to 1/4 tsp red pepper flakes, or to taste
2 ripe plum tomatoes, chopped (about 1 cup)
1 tsp minced fresh rosemary
1/2 lemon, cut into 4 pieces
1/3 cup NW beer, such as a pale ale
2 Tbsp butter, cut into small chunks, or olive oil
1 large rosemary sprig (optional)

Preheat an oven to 500°F. Toss the mussels, garlic, pepper flakes, tomatoes, and minced rosemary in a large bowl. Transfer to a large cast-iron or other heavy skillet with an ovenproof handle. Squeeze the lemon pieces over the mussels, then drop the pieces into the pan. Pour the beer over the mussels and scatter with the butter. Place the rosemary sprig in the center.

Roast for 10 to 15 minutes, or until the mussels are all open. Remove from the oven, and stir gently with a large spoon. Discard any mussels that do not open. Serve in the skillet, set on a hot pad or trivet—being sure to wrap the skillet handle with a cloth napkin or pot holder.

Recipe adapted from Kathy Casey’s Northwest Table, Chronicle Books, San Francisco

Posted by Kathy Casey on September 29th, 2011  |  Comments Off |  Posted in appetizers, Books to Cook, KOMO Radio, Recipes, seafood
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