Posts from April, 2008

Kathy Casey on Yelp

Check out my interview with Yelp. If you don’t already use yelp you absolutely should. It is essential for navigating your way not only around Seattle’s culinary scene, but for all sorts of businesses from boutiques to blow outs. I love the community of regular readers, writing honest reviews of the places they love, and loath.

Posted by Kathy on April 28th, 2008  |  Add Comment |  Posted in Foodie News, Lifestyle, Recent Posts

Mojitos – as heard on Dishing with Kathy Casey on KOMO

Mojitos are  the classic cocktail originating from Cuba. Now one of the most ordered cocktails. Shake up one of these refreshing drinks for your next get-together.

Classic Mojito
Makes 1 drink

3 large sprigs fresh mint
2 ounces white rum
3/4 ounce fresh lime juice
3/4 ounce Simple Syrup*
Splash of chilled soda water

Tear the mint sprigs and drop into a cocktail shaker. With a muddler, press the mint to release its flavors. Fill the shaker with ice. Measure in the rum, lime juice, and simple syrup. Cap and shake vigorously. Pour into a large glass. Top with soda water.

*Simple Syrup- one cup sugar and one cup water brought to a boil and cooled – keep refrigerated for up to 1 month.  © 2008 Kathy Casey Inc.

Peach Melba Mojito
This quick and easy mojito is made with my Dish D’Lish Mojito cocktail mix. You can substitute strawberry puree for the raspberry if desired.

Makes 1 cocktail

1 lime squeeze
2 oz Bacardi Peach Red Rum
2 oz Dish D’Lish Classic Mojito Cocktailor
2 Tbsp. raspberry puree
splash of soda water
Garnish: fresh mint sprig – fresh raspberry if in season

Squeeze & drop lime into cocktail shaker. Fill with ice. Add rum, Cocktailor and puree.
Cap and shake vigorously. Add soda water. Pour into a tall glass. Top with more ice if needed. Garnish with mint and raspberry if using and insert straw. © 2008 Dish D’Lish® Inc

Posted by Kathy on April 23rd, 2008  |  Add Comment |  Posted in Cocktails, KOMO Radio, Recent Posts

Book Review: Hungry for Paris

978-0-8129-7683-0The price of a plane ticket, hotel, and the dollar to euro conversion alone is reason enough to hang up a dream of a vacation in Paris. Sad, no? Instead, pick up an Edith Piaf CD, a nice bottle of Burgundy and cozy up with Alexander Lobrano’s new book, “Hungry for Paris: The Ultimate Guide to the City’s 102 Best Restaurants”. From the start, Lobrano has you hooked with the story of how he fell for the city and a life as a food writer.

“The beef was chewier than what I knew at home, but I’d never eaten a sauce like that in my life. What did it taste like? Smoke, beef, blood, salt, onions, mushrooms, and wine. I spooned, dunked and licked until not a drop of the velvety garnet-colored sauce was left and later spent a restless night knowing that I’d never be free of a powerful, permanent craving for more. Little did I know then that this addiction would become the compass by which I would live my life.”

The European correspondent for Gourmet magazine asks you to consider him the good friend you need to navigate the city’s vast dining scene. He clears up any misconceptions right away with a chapter titled “The Happy Eater’s Almanac”, and, his reviews read like vignettes, with a synopsis at the close of what not to miss. In this charming collection he covers them all from intimate taverns to haute cuisine, seasonal eating to dining alone, leaving no culinary cobblestone unturned.

If you live in the Seattle Area, you’re in luck, as Lobrano will be reading from his book at Janiuk Winery April 22.

Posted by Kathy on April 22nd, 2008  |  Add Comment |  Posted in Recent Posts

Asparagus – as heard on Dishing with Kathy Casey on KOMO

Today is the first show I am doing with KOMO radio station in Seattle. It will air live today at 4:14 pm pacific time and then will be repeated at 6:15. Lisa Brooks, Eric Slocum will be dishing it up with me today about the first of the season asparagus. 

I hope you enjoy my recipe for simple Warm Asparagus with Orange Balsamic Vinaigrette & Hazelnuts. It is quick, easy and d’lish! Also if you look in past blog recipe archives you will find a recipe for Asparagus, Boursin and Shrimp Brunch Scramble which would be so tasty for a weekend brunch. Enjoy!

Warm Asparagus With Orange Balsamic Vinaigrette & Hazelnuts
Whatever your cooking method, just plunging asparagus into boiling water, steaming, or grilling, be sure to cook it only until just tender.
Makes about 4 servings

1 1/2 pounds fresh asparagus
1/2 teaspoon grated orange zest
Juice of one-half orange
1 1/2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar
1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
1/4 teaspoon Dijon mustard (optional)
1/4 – 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1/8 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
3 tablespoons shredded, high quality Parmesan cheese
3 tablespoons chopped hazelnuts, lightly toasted

Wash asparagus and drain well. Snap off tough bottom ends and use in soup or compost. Grill, boil or steam asparagus until just tender.

Meanwhile, in a medium bowl whisk together the orange zest and juice, balsamic vinegar, olive oil and Dijon mustard. Toss in the warm asparagus, coating well in the dressing, and season to taste with the salt and red pepper flakes. Place asparagus on a platter and pour over the remaining dressing. Sprinkle asparagus with the Parmesan and hazelnuts. Serve immediately. © 2008 Kathy Casey Inc.

Posted by Kathy on April 17th, 2008  |  Comments (1) |  Posted in KOMO Radio, Recent Posts, Recipes, sides

Kathy on KOMO

Are you ready Seattle? I’m going to be on KOMO News Radio AM 1000 this Thursday at 4:15 and 6:15 with afternoon hosts Lisa Brooks and Eric Slocum for a weekly feature called “Dishing with Kathy Casey.”

I’m super excited. I love to dish about food, and I have a great list of topics lined up. You can catch all the recipes I discuss as well as added segment features on my blog every Thursday. Fun stuff!

Posted by Kathy on April 17th, 2008  |  Add Comment |  Posted in KOMO Radio, Recent Posts

Pillsbury’s Bakeoff

How exciting is it to have two Seattlites in the Pillsbury bake off? Did you know that there is a million bucks up for stake? Not to mention serious bragging rights. To enter the contest you had to use one Pillsbury product in conjunction with a sponsor’s product (Fisher nuts, Smucker’s jams, C&H sugar, etc). After the recipes are sorted through, 100 finalsit are flown to Dallas Texas for a live bake off! Super fun!

 Check out the Pilsbury.com to see the winner and her 1 million dollar recipe!

Posted by Kathy on April 16th, 2008  |  Add Comment |  Posted in Foodie News, Recent Posts

Cooking Basics – Whipping up a Vinaigrette

Not everyone knows how to cook — but most would like to. I’ll sometimes whip up a vinaigrette at friends’ houses when invited for dinner, and it seems that, more often than not, they say, “Wow! How did you make that? What went in there? The ingredients are in my kitchen?”

So, I thought I would post about a basic meal staple for beginning cooks. Vinaigrette, no sweat!

Contrary to the “standard” measurements for it — which, in my opinion, make the vinaigrette too oily for today’s palate — I prefer to use 1 part vinegar to 2 ½ to 3 parts oil. The vinegar and oil can be any kind. Other essentials are a dollop of Dijon mustard, a big pinch of kosher salt and some pepper.

Those are the fundamentals, and from there you can get creative. Add a pinch of sugar or a drizzle of honey if you like it sweet. Add some garlic, lemon zest and a squeeze of citrus if you wish. Try adding grainy mustard, some chopped fresh herbs or a pinch of ground spice such as cumin or coriander; or some chipotle chili powder and lime juice for a Latin influence.

If Greek is your gig for the evening, then use lemon juice and olive oil, toss in feta cheese, fresh oregano and chopped olives. Italian? Balsamic or red wine vinegar and extra-virgin olive oil, fresh basil, garlic, a dash of grated parmesan. For an Asian style dressing go with rice wine vinegar, mild flavored canola oil and a dash of sesame oil, along with honey, toasted sesame seeds, fresh ginger and hot chili paste.

You get the picture. Start with the basics and twist them to your taste. I have prepared a handy recipe that you can use as your vinaigrette guide to get you started.

Basic Vinaigrette
Makes 1 cup

1/4 cup acid (vinegar* or lemon or lime juice)
2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
3/4 teaspoon kosher salt (use less if adding cheese or olives)
3/4cup oil**
Flavorings as desired***

With a small wire whisk, in a small bowl, whisk together your acid component, Dijon mustard and salt. Then slowly whisk in the oil, adding it in a thin drizzle. This technique is to emulsify (make smooth and combined) your dressing. Then add your flavoring components.

* Any of the following vinegars: cider, balsamic, red-wine, white-wine, rice-wine

** Any of the following or a combination: Mild-tasting vegetable oil (canola, olive, extra-virgin olive); nut oils such as hazelnut or walnut (do not use nut oils for more than half of total oil)

*** Any of the following or a combination:
Black pepper, pinch of cayenne pepper
1 tablespoon grated lemon, lime or orange zest (colored part only — no white pith)
1 tablespoon chopped mild fresh herbs (basil, tarragon, chives, oregano, cilantro)
1 ½ teaspoons chopped strong fresh herbs (thyme, rosemary, marjoram)
2 to 3 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese,crumbled blue cheese or feta cheese
2 tablespoons chopped kalamata olives, sun-dried tomatoes or roasted peppers
2 to 3 teaspoons finely minced fresh garlic
2 to 3 teaspoons finely minced fresh ginger
1 tablespoon honey
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons poppy seeds
1 tablespoon Asian sesame oil
1 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds
1 tablespoon finely minced shallots
2 tablespoons thinly sliced green onions
1 teaspoon hot chili paste or hot sauce

Chef’s Notes: You can keep the vinaigrette refrigerated for up to two weeks. Whisk up well before each use, and toss with your favorite greens. Experiment with different flavorings and combinations for your vinaigrette. Also, try out various greens and salad additions, such as nuts, fruits, cheeses, meats and seafood.      

Copyright 2007, Kathy Casey Food Studios

Posted by Kathy on April 15th, 2008  |  Add Comment |  Posted in Recent Posts

Ginger-Wasabi Raita Dip – big flavor….guilt free!

I love this Asian twist to the Indian yogurt dip, raita. You can use whole-milk plain yogurt, but if you are watching your waistline, then use low-fat or fat-free plain yogurt or a combination of that and fat-free quark. I have added spicy wasabi, fresh ginger and grated cucumber. I like to serve this dip with veggies such as bell peppers and carrots or rice crackers for a big-flavor guilt-free snack. It is also great as a topper to grilled fish or chicken.

Ginger-Wasabi Raita Dip
Makes 3 cups

1/2 medium cucumber, peeled, seeded, coarsely grated, with the juice squeezed out well (you should have about ¾ cup squeezed cucumber)
1 tablespoon wasabi powder +1 tablespoon water 
        OR 1-2 tablespoons wasabi paste (depending upon spice level desired)
2 cups plain nonfat yogurt or 1 cup plain nonfat yogurt + 1 cup fat-free quark
1 tablespoon finely minced fresh ginger
3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
3/4 to 1 teaspoon sugar
2 green onions, thinly sliced
1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro
Garnish: finely diced red peppers

Be sure the liquid from the cucumber is squeezed out well. In a medium bowl, mix wasabi powder and water to make a paste. Mix in yogurt, then squeezed cucumber. Stir in ginger, salt, sugar, green onions and cilantro.Transfer to a serving bowl, sprinkle dip with red peppers for garnish, and surround with dip-ables of your choice.

Chef’s notes:This dip can be made up to one day in advance and refrigerated, but it is best made and served the same day. Copyright 2007, Kathy Casey Food Studios

Posted by Kathy on April 11th, 2008  |  Add Comment |  Posted in Recent Posts, Recipes, sides
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