Posts from May, 2013

Easy Smoothies!

As we’ve all heard, eating a healthy breakfast is important. It’s the key to maintaining a healthy lifestyle and getting your metabolism revved up for the day.  But some of us just don’t have time to get it together in the mornings (especially without that first cup of joe!). Now, this is where smoothies come in!

Dust off your blender (I love my Vitamix!) then add in either fat-free yogurt or protein powder, some of your favorite fruits either fresh or frozen and filtered water. But don’t stop there!

Try new additions like matcha powder, flax seeds, goji berries, and even trusty peanut butter; these all are great smoothie boosters.

“Green” smoothies are ever popular these days, but don’t let the color fool you. They’re super healthy! I like to make mine with organic “green” juice, some protein powder, half a ripe banana to add natural sweetness, then blend it all up with half a peeled orange and add in more greens with handful of kale! Yes, it looks like Shrek made it – but it’s a great way to start your day and you’ll feel green goodness coursing through you!

For other smoothie-inspired recipes, check out my blogging friend Healthy Blender Recipes‘ recipe for VEGA Vegan Banana Vanilla Chai Green Protein Smoothie – wowza! -Kathy

Kathy’s Jump-Start Smoothie
Makes 1 serving

1/2 cup frozen fruits or fresh fruits
1/2 cup fat-free plain Greek yogurt
2 Tbsp agave nectar (or sub honey for another all natural sweetener)
1/2 cup ice cubes
1/2 – 1 tsp flax seed (the more seeds – the more “texture”)
1 fresh kale leaf (optional)

Place ingredients in the order above and blend until smooth. Enjoy your healthy start to a great day!

Recipe by Kathy Casey Liquid Kitchen®

Posted by Kathy Casey on May 30th, 2013  |  Comments Off |  Posted in breakfast, Foodie News, Fruit, KOMO Radio, Lifestyle, Recent Posts, Recipes, Snacks

It’s Salmon Season!

Nothing says Pacific Northwest like salmon. It’s that time of year again when this rich, delicious local gem is readily available. Bring on the sunshine; it’s Alaska salmon-cooking season!

Grilled Salmon
D’lish Salmon!
(Photo courtesy of Alaska Seafood Marketing)

There are several varieties of salmon available locally that can fit any budget and taste, from King to Keta. Rich in slow-digesting proteins and Omega-3 fatty acids, this nutritious fish is perfect for a healthy meal whether in a salad, pan seared, or grilled.

Salmon’s natural oil and fat content help keep it moist and tender, even when grilling. You can also help it stay that way and add some flavor with a wonderful brine before cooking it.

Brining possibilities are endless. One of my favorites is made with brown sugar and soy. Just dunk your pieces for half an hour to an hour, then grill if the weather is warm enough or pan-sear and finish in a hot oven. Yum!

Salmon makes the perfect platform for glazes, vinaigrettes and other tasty toppings. How about a nice coat of Chipotle Honey Glaze, a smear of Orange Ginger Butter or a drizzle of Zesty Lemon Basil Vinaigrette? This makes me want to fire up my trusty BBQ right now! See my tips below for outdoor grilling  with Alaska salmon.

So whether you’re smoking your salmon, grilling it or oven-roasting – be sure to select wild Alaska salmon. . –Kathy

Chipotle Honey Glaze
Make a generous 1/2 cup

1/2 cup local honey
3 tablespoons puréed chipotle peppers in adobo sauce*

Stir together in a small bowl until well combined. Store refrigerated for up to 2 weeks.

*To make chipotle purée: Purée a can of chipotle peppers in adobo sauce with a hand blender, blender or food processor until smooth. Freeze any remaining purée for another use.

Recipe created for Alaska Seafood Marketing by Kathy Casey Food Studios®

Orange Ginger Butter
Switch this basic recipe up with different combinations of citrus and herbs. Change out the ginger for garlic and try using a different mustard as well. Roll up different variations into logs in plastic wrap and freeze for up to 4 months. Just slice off a few pieces for a salmon topping anytime.

Makes 1 cup

8 tablespoons (1 stick) salted butter, softened, cut into chunks
1 1/2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
3 tablespoons orange juice concentrate
1 tablespoon finely minced orange zest
1 tablespoon finely minced ginger
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 green onions, very thinly sliced

Place all ingredients except the green onion in a food processor. Process until smooth and emulsified, scraping down the sides of the work bowl often. (If the butter doesn’t come together right away, be patient and continue processing.) When the mixture is well blended, add the green onion and pulse until mixed. Keep refrigerated, tightly covered, for up to 7 days.

Recipe created for Alaska Seafood Marketing by Kathy Casey Food Studios®

Zesty Lemon Basil Vinaigrette
This quick and easy homemade dressing is delicious drizzled over salmon. You can switch up this basic vinaigrette recipe by changing out the basil for cilantro and the lemon for lime, and/or adding a dash of hot sauce for some zing. You can also double the recipe and add all the ingredients at once to a blender to make a more creamy dressing.

Makes 1 cup

2 cups fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons local honey
2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
1 teaspoon finely minced fresh garlic
1/2 cup olive oil
2 tablespoons minced fresh basil
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
Fresh-ground black pepper

Place the lemon juice, honey, mustard and garlic in a small bowl. Whisk to combine. Continue whisking and drizzle in the oil to incorporate. Then stir in the basil, salt and pepper. Store refrigerated for up to 10 days.

Recipe created for Alaska Seafood Marketing by Kathy Casey Food Studios®

Outdoor Grilling – Alaska Salmon Fillet Portions
5- to 6-ounce Alaska Keta or Sockeye salmon fillet portions, with skin
Olive oil
Kosher salt and pepper

Brush grill to clean it well and lightly oil it. (See cooking tips.)

If using a charcoal grill, load with charcoal briquettes and ignite them; heat grill to medium-high temperature, about 375° to 400°F. If using a gas or propane grill, set to medium-high temperature and heat to about 375° to 400°F.

Bring fish out of refrigerator 15 minutes before cooking. When grill is hot, pat fish dry with paper towels.

Drizzle a large dinner plate with olive oil. Swipe each piece of fish on both sides through oil. Sprinkle with seasoning.

Place fish flesh side down on hottest part of grill. Let fish cook on the first side for about 3 minutes for sockeye, or 4 minutes for keta. (If the fillet is on the thinner side, reduce cooking time by about 1/2 to 1 minute on each side.) Do not move fish around as the goal is to create nice grill marks.

Carefully flip fish over using a metal spatula. Cook on skin side for about 3 minutes for sockeye, or 4 minutes for keta, or until fish is still lightly translucent in the center. Remove fish to a plate.

You will want to pull your fish off slightly underdone as there is heat carryover and it will continue to cook for a few minutes after removing from heat. Larger salmon species like King will take a few minutes more to cook. Use your best judgment.

Recipe created for Alaska Seafood Marketing by Kathy Casey Food Studios®

Posted by Kathy Casey on May 23rd, 2013  |  Comments Off |  Posted in KOMO Radio, other, Recent Posts, Recipes, seafood

Farmers Market Local Bounty

Thanks to Washington’s amazingly diverse agricultural community, we are blessed with loads of farmers markets. Shopping for local products means you get the best of the best at the peak of its season!

They are also a great place to pick up produce you might not have tried before like nettles (great for flavorful soup) or freshly picked wild morel mushrooms to sauté serve alongside a sizzling steak, or make a rich sauce to top halibut!

Of course, downtown’s famous Pike Place Market is always a fun trip, but hey — new farmers markets are popping up all the time. Check out www.SeattleFarmersMarkets.org to see what’s new in the city!

Before you venture out, here are a few helpful tips:

-Wear comfortable shoes
-Have a couple of large reusable grocery bags with you (for all your great finds!)
-Bring cash (it’ll make the experience quicker and easier)
-My biggest tip is to carry a small notebook to record cooking notes and varietal info from the growers

So get out there and support local farmers markets! Don’t forget to leave a note on this blog with some of your favorite market finds. I would love to hear all about them! –Kathy

Pan-Roasted Halibut with Morel Mushroom Cream
The morel, one of the richest-tasting wild mushrooms, is a spring delight after long NW winters. Just a few morels will do you in a recipe, for their flavor is intense. Serve with sautéed fresh pea vines.

Makes 4 servings

Sauce
1 tablespoon butter
1 shallot, minced
1 clove fresh garlic, minced
1 cup coarse chopped fresh morel mushrooms (about 3 ounces), or 1/2 ounce dried morels, soaked in the white wine and then chopped
3 tablespoons brandy
1/2 cup dry white wine
1 1/2 cups heavy whipping cream
1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon salt
Pinch of white pepper

Fish
4 skinless halibut fillet portions (6 to 8 ounces each)
Salt
Freshly ground black pepper
1 tablespoon olive oil

Fresh chives for garnishing

To make the sauce, melt the butter in a heavy saucepan over medium heat. Sauté the shallot, garlic, and mushrooms, stirring often, for about 2 minutes, or until the shallot is translucent and mushrooms are tender. Add the brandy and wine and cook to reduce for about 5 minutes. Add the cream and bring to a simmer, then reduce the heat and slowly simmer, stirring often, for about 20 minutes, or until the sauce is reduced to about 1 – 1 1/4 cups and lightly thickened. Stir in the lemon juice, salt, and white pepper. Transfer the sauce to a blender and blend until smooth but with some texture still, about 30 seconds; be careful, because the sauce is very hot. Set aside and keep warm.

To cook the fish, preheat an oven to 450°F. Season the halibut with salt and pepper to taste. Heat the oil in a large, heavy ovenproof skillet over medium-high heat. Cook the fillets until golden brown, about 2 to 3 minutes on each side. Transfer the skillet to the oven and bake the fish until just cooked through, about 3 to 4 minutes, depending on thickness of the fillets.

To serve, place the fillets on warm plates spoon the sauce over them. Garnish with chives.

Chef’s Note: Prized halibut cheeks would be a tasty alternative when available. They range in size from 3 ounces to up to 1 pound each, depending on the size of the fish.

Recipe adapted from Kathy Casey’s Northwest Table.

Posted by Kathy Casey on May 16th, 2013  |  Comments Off |  Posted in Foodie News, KOMO Radio, Lifestyle, Recent Posts, Recipes, seafood

Dishing with Kathy Casey: The Newsletter

D’lish Deviled Eggs

My 10th cookbook D’Lish Deviled Eggs has HATCHED! Deviled eggs are always a party favorite and the first to fly off the table. With 54 tried-and-tested (thanks KCFS team!) recipes, my new book takes my love for this people-pleasing appetizer from traditional to creative. From the Classic Picnic-Style to Beet’ing Heart, there is definitely an egg recipe for everyone. Yum! One of my absolute favorite recipes from D’Lish Deviled Eggs is my “California Roll” Deviled Egg”, topped with Alaska King crab – YUM! Try this one out for a sushi-twist! And for more d’lish egg recipes and tips, check out my new website www.DLishDeviledEggs.com for all things Deviled Eggs!

DDE Book CoverCalifornia Roll egg
“California Roll” Deviled Eggs – D’lish!
(Book Cover & photo by Kathy Casey Food Studios from D’Lish Deviled Eggs)

For more D’Lish Deviled Egg tips, check out my segment on King 5’s New Day Northwest.

New Day cams
Behind the scenes at New Day Northwest!

Culination!

culination-logo

Out to revolutionize the way people learn how to cook (while also learning about wine and make cocktails of course!), Culination is a cool new e-learning platform that is mobile/tablet friendly, very engaging, and will work with voice command as well. But the Culination team needs your help! If you’re interested and want to learn fun recipes from taste makers like myself, Thirsty Girl’s Leslie Sbrocco, restaurateur Ethan Stowell, PBS cooking veteran Joanne Weir, award winning chef Jason Wilson and others, then help spread the word and donate through the Indiegogo Campaign. Even $5 will help. So please join us and become a Culinator!

If you want to hear all about it in detail then check out pal Siiri Sampson’s blog for the whole scoop!

Tasty Travels & Fun Events

Since January, it has been non-stop traveling and great events like Speed Rack – Seattle! Speed Rack is a Sassy National Competition created by and for female bartenders, pitting them against each other in a round robin style timed challenge – check out this video teaser on YouTube.

Speed Rack logo

Alongside fellow guest judges Rob Roy’s Anu Apte, Drink Boy’s Robert Hess, and Pegu Club’s Audrey Saunders, we watched, tasted and critiqued as these mistresses behind the bar worked their cocktail magic.

Speed Rack judges
The Judges!

The finals are coming up this month in New York – so if you’re in the area on May 16th, come cheer on the finalists! Make sure to get your tickets soon.

Speed Rack ladies
The Northwest Speed Rack Ladies!

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VIBE logo

Shortly right after, it was time to fly out the door again – from St. Louis to Boston and then to Las Vegas for the industry annual VIBE Conference! Hosted in the always faboo Las Vegas, this annual event brings in spirits industry leaders and taste makers for a jam-packed two days full of seminars, panels, presentations…and of course tastings!

At the opening Pour It On reception, we teamed up with Monin and William Grant & Sons and crafted a crowd favorite: the Berries & Brimstone cocktail featuring Monin’s new Hickory Smoke Syrup.

KC
Shaking up a Berries & Brimstone!

(Photos by Ernie Sapiro)

First, we mixed the smoke syrup with Everclear to make a flammable mist. We dropped a dry bay leaf into an Old Fashioned glass, spritzed it liberally with the mist, and flamed it to char the leaf. Then we shook up Milagro Reposado tequila and a few fresh blackberries with fresh lime and Monin Blackberry… then poured it over the flaming leaf. This process added a rich layer of flavor to the drink, balancing the sweet, tart and savory.

The following day, I teamed up with my Liquid Kitchen associate Dänny Ronen and bar managers/mixologists Matt Seiter from Sancturia in St. Louis and Kevin Diedrich from Jasper’s Corner Tap in San Francisco, to present a panel on one of the hottest up-and-coming trends – Tapping Potential: Cocktails On Tap!

Seminar photo
Seminar in session
(Photos by Heather Jones and Ernie Sapiro)

Kevin and Matt did a “live demo” on tapping a cocktail, and then Liquid Kitchen’s Heather Jones proceeded to serve over 60 cocktails in just a few minutes. The whole process from the tapping demo to serving cocktails in front of the attendees was less than 7 minutes – now that’s some fast service!

VIBE panel

Cocktails on Tap Panel with Matt, Dänny, Kevin and myself.
(Photo courtesy of Ernie Sapiro)

And to top off a great week the Fairmont Hotel’s & Resort won the VIBE Vista award for Best Spirits Program for Hotels, Cruise Lines, & Casinos for their FAME program (that Liquid Kitchen created and has managed since 2006) – exciting!!!

Congrats to the Fairmont Hotels & Resorts for winning 2013 Best Spirits Program award!

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Driscoll logo

Next it was off to Driscoll’s berry farms with an amazing group of top bloggers. I absolutely love berries so I was definitely in berry-licious heaven while learning a lot about berries. We got to taste new varieties of berries right in the fields and met the young “Dr. Strawberry” who shared with us how they are constantly improving Driscoll’s berry varieties – sweeeet! Check out my blog for my tasty Billowing Strawberry Poppy Seed Layer Cake and Strawberry Shag Cocktail recipes.

The next day the group headed to the annual Pebble Beach Food & Wine. I really enjoyed meeting and hanging out with some of my favorite bloggers like the Intoxicologist, Blender Girl, Food in Jars, and Health & Wellness expert Ani Phyo during this tasty weekend full of demos, seminars and parties!

Rasp hands
Yes, I LOVE raspberries this much!

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Then it was off to Kentucky for the Beam Pinnacle of Mixology event to lead a fun Pinnacle Cocktails and Techniques Inspired from the Kitchen seminar. Heather Jones and I showed techniques for a “new school” Chi Chi: shaking up fresh Pineapple-Agave, Pinnacle Vodka, and fresh lime – then topped it with Coconut Milk Foam and a “carbonated” cherry – fun!

POM set-up
Preparing for my seminar

Salted Caramel Whipped Mochas
Dispensing Salted Caramel Whipped “Mochas!”

Other topics included cocktail umami like in my Garden Oasis cocktail – vodka, hand-pressed basil, celery and cucumber (celery adds a salty touch and an umami note), shaken with a lemon elixir. We garnished this with plumped basil seeds, adding a super cool texture to the cocktail.

We then finished off our presentation with a cool technique I learned from Johannes Roiner, Head of Culinary Strategy at iSi. He taught me that coffee has proteins in it and when combined with a little syrup, liquor, and ice then charged and shaken – you can have a super frothy espresso cocktail. Voila – thus the Salted Carmel Whipped Mocha!

Serious Sippin’ with the Liquid Kitchen

KCLK logo

Make sure to stay tuned for my brand new episodes of my Liquid Kitchen cocktail show with Small Screen Network! Filming of Season 4 has just wrapped up. New episodes include: Berries & Bubbles, Pineapple Mezcal Cooler, and more. In the meantime, try my Gin with Housemade Bitter Lemon and Soda for a refreshing springtime drink!

Ice balls
Erwin
“guarding” the big bowl of Sparkling Tradewinds Punch with Bitter Truth & Cherry Ice Balls

SSN behind the scenes
Behind the scenes of Liquid Kitchen with the Small Screen crew!

D’Lish Book Reads

Here are some of my new favorite reads – I hope you enjoy them as much as I did!

The Drunken Botanist by Amy Stewart
Do you ever stop to think about the garnishes, liqueurs and syrups you put in your favorite cocktails? Amy Stewart, author of The Drunken Botanist, definitely has! Amy’s guide to backyard bartending isn’t your standard neighborhood cocktail recipe book. She has uncovered some seriously cool history on some common, and some not-so-common cocktail ingredients, such as corn and agave to barley and lemon verbena. Check out her funny promo vid, too!

Book Covers

The 50 Mile Bouquet by Debra Prinzing
Outdoor living specialist and author Debra Prinzing writes a great read on the slow flower movement in her latest book, The 50 Mile Bouquet. From organic flower farmers to the hot-topic of sustainability, Debra’s book is a great guide for those with a green thumb. I love to garden and this is definitely a must-read!

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Don’t forget to join me on my blog Dishing with Kathy Casey and weekends on KOMO News Radio for all things D’lish, including recipes, tips, and fun events. And grab a copy of Sip Northwest Magazine (available at my Dish D’Lish Seattle airport locations) and check out my Shake Swizzle & Stir column!

Here’s wishing you all a wonderful spring with many tasty adventures! –Kathy

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Follow on Twitter @KathyCaseyChef. Blogging: Dishing with Kathy Casey.
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Watch: www.LiquidKitchen.tv.

If you haven’t signed up for my Newsletter, you can sign up here.

Premier Chef’s Dinner Benefit hosted by Rick Bayless!

The annual Premier Chef’s Dinner benefit is here again! This year it is being hosted by none other than the illustrious Rick Bayless, and will take place at Sodo Park by Herban Feast on Sunday, May 19th. In it’s 22nd year, the Premier Chef’s Dinner benefits Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and will feature an all-star cast of Seattle’s most-loved chefs including Greg Atkinson of Restaurant MarchéJosh Henderson and Brian O’Connor of Skillet; Phil Lehmann and Kim Mahar of RN74; Jason Stratton of Spinasse; Rachel Yang of Joule Restaurant; and many more. Make sure to get your tickets soon as this is a wonderful event with all proceeds supporting Fred Hutch.

For more information, visit www.fredhutch.org/chefs.

Fred Hutchinson

Posted by Kathy Casey on May 13th, 2013  |  Comments Off |  Posted in events, Foodie News, Lifestyle

Nutritious & D’lish Almonds!

Almonds! Whether you like them raw, toasted, or made into a smooth butter, these little nuts are great for you. They’re rich in dietary fiber, vitamin E, and minerals like calcium, iron, magnesium and zinc.

Most importantly, they’re a great source of protein and perfect for a mid-day snack! Just 10 raw almonds can give you a quick pick-me-up!

I also love them toasted and tossed into basmati rice, sprinkled over yogurt or in my morning oatmeal. And of course, they add a great a great crunch factor to salads like in my Cranberry Almond Crunch Slaw. Try switching almonds in, instead of walnuts, for your next batch of chocolate chip cookies.

Speaking of baking, this summer get creative with your fruit shortcake by whipping up a batch of Cinnamon Almond Shortcakes – top with a bounty of seasonal fruits (e.g.: strawberries, raspberries, cherries, apricots, peaches, grilled pineapple, etc.) and a poof of brown sugar whipped cream – yum! –Kathy

Cranberry Almond Salad

Photo by Kathy Casey Food Studios®

Cranberry Almond Crunch Slaw
Makes about 8 servings

1/3 cup unseasoned rice vinegar
1/4 cup honey
1/4 cup sour cream or plain Greek yogurt
1 tsp salt
1 tsp sambal oelek or other Asian red chili paste, or a pinch of red chili flakes
4 green onions, thinly sliced
10 cups thinly sliced napa cabbage (about 1 large head)
1/2 cup dried cranberries, coarsely chopped
1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh cilantro
1 package Almond Accents Honey Roasted sliced almonds, or 1 cup toasted sliced almonds

In a large bowl, whisk together vinegar, honey, sour cream, salt and sambal oelek. Add green onions, cabbage, cranberries and cilantro and toss until well coated.

The salad should sit for 30 minutes before serving. If making way ahead, refrigerate dressing and salad ingredients separately, then toss together 30 minutes before ready to serve. Toss Almond Accents into salad right before serving.

Recipe by Kathy Casey Food Studios®

Cinnamon Almond Scones
This not-too-sweet, nutty scone is the perfect foil for sweet summer stone fruit shortcake. Serve 6 scones for dessert and then you’ll have 2 extra for breakfast or seconds!

Makes 8 scones

2 1/4 cups flour
1/4 cup sugar
3/4 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
8 Tbsps (1 stick) butter
1/4 cup sliced almonds
1 egg
3/4 cup buttermilk, plus more if needed
1 egg white
1/2 tsp water

Preheat an oven to 375°F. Sift the flour, sugar, baking soda, salt, and cinnamon together into a large bowl. Cut in the butter with a pastry blender or 2 dinner knives until the mixture is the texture of coarse crumbs (just like making a pie crust). Stir in the almonds.

In a separate bowl, whisk the whole egg with the 3/4 cup buttermilk until blended. Make a well in the center of the flour mixture and pour the liquid into it. Combine with a few swift strokes. The dough should form a ball and all the flour should be incorporated. (If the dough is way too dry, add 1 tablespoon more buttermilk.) Do not overmix.

On a lightly floured surface, pat the dough into a 3/4-inch-thick round. Carefully place on an ungreased baking sheet, then cut into 8 wedges, leaving the sides still touching.

In a small bowl, whisk the egg white and water until mixed, then brush the dough lightly with the egg white glaze.

Bake for 30 to 35 minutes, or until the scones are cooked through and golden. Let cool slightly before serving.

Recipe adapted from Kathy Casey’s Northwest Table, Chronicle Books.

Posted by Kathy Casey on May 11th, 2013  |  Comments Off |  Posted in dessert, Fruit, KOMO Radio, Recent Posts, Recipes, salads, sides
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