Mustard is a Must!

I love mustard—zesty Dijon, zingy classic yellow, bitey coarse country-style. It is a universal condiment. From the seeds cooked in Indian fruit chutneys, to the sinus-clearing fiery paste served with Chinese barbecued pork.

Take Dijon for example. It’s a staple in the American kitchen and a must ingredient in many of my recipes from classic vinaigrettes to deviled eggs. I often use it to build an extra “layer” of flavor like in my Whipped Cauliflower with Dijon Mustard. It really rounds out the flavors in the dish.

Rub whole-grain mustard on steaks and roasts or stir it into a garlic alfredo pasta sauce. It’s good on or in just about anything! I like to roast shallots and then blend with whole- grain mustard for a d’lish accompaniment to charcuterie.

And last but not least, we can’t forget the American yellow mustard… Shh! It really is my fave! Zig-zagged across a hot dog of course and the classic ingredient in a home-style eggy potato salad! If you’ve never tried a Southern-style, yellow barbecue sauce (alias “Mop”), you should!

If you’re ever interested in making your own mustard, it’s pretty easy. My No. 1 tip would be to remember that the longer your fresh mustard sits, the mellower it gets. It can be pretty spicy when first made!

Yellow Mustard
Yellow Mustard Flower
Photo from Saskatchewan Mustard Development Commission

And if you want to learn more about mustard check out the Saskatchewan Mustard Development Commission’s site – this is a cool commission that represents mustard growers and helps raise awareness about all things mustard! How cool is that! –Kathy

Whipped Cauliflower with Dijon Mustard
Makes 6 to 8 servings

1 large head cauliflower, about 6 cups florets
1/3 cup heavy cream
1/4 cup sour cream
3 Tbsp. butter
1 Tbsp. Dijon mustard
1/2 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. white pepper
3/4 cup grated gruyere cheese
2 Tbsp. thinly sliced fresh chives

Preheat oven to 350°F. Lightly spray a 1 1/2-quart gratin baking dish with cooking spray, and reserve.

Break cauliflower into florets, and boil until totally tender, about 5 minutes. Florets should be “mashable” but not mushy. Drain well, transfer to a food processor with the cream, sour cream, butter, Dijon, salt and pepper.

Process until mixture is a smooth, thick puree. Pulse in 1/2 cup of the grated gruyere.

Transfer mixture into gratin baking dish, and sprinkle with remaining cheese. Bake in preheated oven for about 30 – 35 minutes, or until heated through, and the cheese is melted and slightly browned.

Sprinkle with chives to garnish.

Recipe © by Kathy Casey Food Studios® – www.KathyCasey.com

Posted by Kathy on April 13th, 2017  |  Add Comment |  Posted in Foodie News, Recent Posts, Recipes, KOMO Radio, sides

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