Mixing Up Mashed Potatoes

The holiday season is all about get-togethers and potlucks. Traditional dishes are always comforting, but I think it’s time for a flavor upgrade. I’m looking at you, mashed potatoes!

There are tons of ways to get creative and mix up your mash. Instead of the traditional butter, sour cream, or milk – stir in a healthy dollop of Greek yogurt for a tangy kick. You could fold in some caramelized onions with blue cheese. Or how about adding a little wasabi, ginger, edamame and a dash of soy to your mashed potatoes to transform them into an Asian-inspired, d’lish dish – my Wasabi Mashed Potatoes will blow you away!

But if you’re a mushroom lover like me, then I have the perfect spin on mashed ‘taters for you…my Wild Mushroom Mashed Potatoes. Packed with a variety of ‘shrooms – the earthy flavor pairs perfectly with the creamy richness of the mash. Russet potatoes are the most popular choice for making a fluffy mash, but Yukon Golds also have a creamy richness to them.

But no matter what potato you use, be sure to always whip your spuds when they are piping hot to avoid the dreaded gluey potato syndrome!
-Kathy

Wasabi Mashed Potatoes
If after you make the potatoes you would like them a bit hotter, just mix a little more wasabi powder with some water to make a loose paste and then stir into potatoes. You can also use wasabi paste that comes in a tube as well – just add about 2-3 teaspoons, or to taste. If you’re watching the calories loose the butter and add in some fat free sour cream or Greek yogurt instead.

Makes about 6 1-cup servings

2 – 3 teaspoons wasabi powder (depending upon the heat you like)
1 tablespoon water
3/4 teaspoon salt (more or less to taste)
2 1/2 pounds russet potatoes, peeled and cut in half (about 3 very large potatoes)
pinch of salt
1/2 cup milk or half-and-half
6 tablespoons butter
1 tablespoon soy sauce
chopped fresh cilantro or parsley for garnish (optional)

In a very small bowl mix together the wasabi powder, water and salt and set aside.

Place potatoes in a very large pot and cover with water at least 3 inches above potatoes. Add a pinch of salt. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and cook on a low boil till fork tender, about 20 – 30 minutes. Test potatoes to be sure they’re tender all the way through.

Meanwhile, combine in a small pan over low heat the milk or half-and-half, butter and soy sauce. Heat till the butter is melted and the milk is warm. Remove from heat and stir in the wasabi mixture.

When potatoes are cooked, drain them well in a large colander, then return them to the pot. Shake pot over low heat about 30 seconds to dry out any remaining water. Remove from the heat and add half the hot liquid mixture. (Both the potatoes and the liquid must be hot.) With a heavy-duty whisk or masher, mash the potatoes. Then add remaining liquid and whip/mash up the potatoes till they are fluffy.

Mound potatoes in a large warm bowl. Sprinkle with chopped cilantro or parsley.

Wild Mushroom Mashed Potatoes
Makes about 6 (1-cup) servings

2 1/2 pounds russet potatoes, peeled and cut in halves or thirds, depending on size (about 3 very large potatoes)
Pinch of salt
1/2 cup milk or half-and-half
1/4 teaspoon white pepper
6 tablespoons butter
1 teaspoon salt (more or less to taste)
2 teaspoons butter or margarine
1 tablespoon finely minced fresh garlic
2 cups finely chopped assorted mushrooms (see note)
2 tablespoons dry sherry (optional)
Minced fresh chives or parsley for garnish (optional)

Place potatoes in a very large pot and cover with water at least 3 inches above potatoes. Add a pinch of salt. Bring to a boil then reduce heat and cook on a low boil till fork tender, about 20-30 minutes. Test potatoes to be sure they’re tender all the way through.

Meanwhile, combine in a small pan over low heat the milk, white pepper, 6 tablespoons butter and 1 teaspoon salt. Heat till the butter is melted and the milk is warm. Do not boil. Keep warm.

In a large non-stick skillet, heat the 2 teaspoons butter over medium-high heat. Add garlic and mushrooms and saute for about 3 minutes until thoroughly cooked and all moisture has evaporated. Add sherry and saute 1-1 1/2 minutes more. Remove from heat.

When potatoes are cooked, drain them well in a large colander, then return them to the pot. Shake pot over low heat about 30 seconds to dry out any remaining water. Remove from the heat and add half the hot liquid mixture. (Both the potatoes and the liquid must be hot.) With a heavy duty whisk or masher, mash the potatoes. Then add remaining liquid and whip/mash up the potatoes till they are fluffy.

Mix in the mushrooms and mound potatoes in a large warm bowl. Sprinkle with minced chives or parsley.

Chef’s Notes: Wild mushrooms, such as morels, chanterelles and fresh porcini, are preferable. Or use domestic mushrooms such as button and shiitake or a mixture of domestic and wild mushrooms. If fresh wild mushrooms are not available, then substitute rehydrated, dry ones such as morels and porcini. To rehydrate them, pour boiling water over to just cover and let steep till softened. Drain before using. (Soaking liquid can be used in sauces or soups.)

This recipe is extra-delicious made with the half-and-half. However, you can make it with low-fat milk and skimp on or omit the butter if you’re really “watching it.”

Recipe by Kathy Casey Food Studios®

Posted by Kathy on November 30th, 2017  |  Add Comment |  Posted in Recent Posts

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